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Cannibalism and Performance Evaluation of Hybrids between Clarias batrachus and Clarias gariepinus

Abstract

Cannibalism is an important characteristic of African catfish that significantly reduces the number of stocked fish at harvest. This study evaluates the effect of reciprocal hybridization of Clarias batrachus and Clarias gariepinus on cannibalism and growth performance of their progenies in an indoor rearing system. The result obtained reveals excellent performance of hybrids of C. gariepinus ♂ and C. batrachus ♀ over the purebreds in terms of growth. However, the reciprocal hybrids between C. gariepinus ♀ and C. batrachus ♂ all died few hours after hatching. Cannibalism was significantly reduced in the crosses between C. gariepinus ♂ and C. batrachus ♀ with 100% survival after five months of culture. Hence, this could be exploited in commercial production of catfish to reduce cannibalism and increase harvest size of fish farmers.

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Intractable Pernicious Practices in West Africa

Bibliography ABLER, Thomas S. (1980): Iroquois Cannibalism: Fact Not Fiction. In Ethno History Vol. 27, No. 4, Special Iroquois Issue, pp. 309-316. ARENS, William (1979): The Man Eating Myth. Anthropology & Anthropophagy . Oxford: O.U.P. BURROWS, D. (1914): The Human Leopard of Sierra Leone. In Journal of the Royal African Society, Vol. 3, No. 50, pp. 143-151. BEATTY, Kenneth James (1915): Human Leopards: An account of the Trials of Human Leopards before the Special Commission Courts; with a note on Sierra Leone, Past and Present

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Diet Composition and Trophic Level of Greater Forkbeard Phycis blennoides (Gadiform: Phycidae) from the Algerian Coast

. Gland Switzerland and Malaga, Spain, IUCN, 61. Alvarez, Z. R., Crustàceos, R. (1968): Decàpodos Ibéricos. Investigacion pesquera. BarcelonaTomo 32, agosto, Deposito legal M. 865-1958, 510. Baras, E., Jobling, M. (2002): Dynamics of intra cohort cannibalism in cultured fish. Aquaculture Research, 33, 7, 461-479. Benchalel, W., Derbal, F., Kara, M. H. (2010): Régime alimentaire du sar commun Diplodus sargus sargus (Sparidae) des côtes de l’est algérien. Cybium, 34, 3, 231-242. Benghali, S. M., Mouffok, S., Kherraz, A., Zitouni, B. (2014a

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Wendigo Psychosis

). The so called hysteropsychoses: Latah, windigo and pibloktoq. In Extraordinary Disorders of Human Behavior 6. https://analepsis.files.wordpress.com/2015/02/windigo2.pdf 7. Lietz, M. (2016). Cannibalism in contact narratives and the evolution of the wendigo. 8. https://www.dictionary.com/browse/browser 9. Fiddler, Thomas; Stevens, James R. (1985). Killing the Shamen. Manotick, Ontario: Penumbra Press. ISBN 978-0920806814 10. Leighton AH, Hughes JM PhD. Cultures as a Causative of Mental Disorder. Milbank Q. 2005;83(4):10.1111/j.1468

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Biology and predatory attributes of a diplogasterid nematode, Fictor composticola Khan et al., 2008

Summary

Biology of Fictor composticola has been studied on Aphelenchus avenae in vitro. It reproduces by amphimixis, embryonic development is completed in 24 - 27 h and life cycle in 3 - 4 days. Fusion of sperm and egg pronuclei occurs in the uteri. Pulsation of median oesophageal bulb and pressing of lips against egg shell is seen just prior to hatching but teeth seem to play no role in this process. No moulting occurs inside the egg shell and the first stage juvenile hatches out. Female and male undergo mating upon addition of water in the culture plates and continue to swim in copula for a considerable time. A female lays 1.6 - 4.0 eggs in 24 h while feeding upon A. radicicolus. Predation and reproduction is affected by the temperature and 25 - 35 °C is the optimum range for these phenomena. Process of feeding as recorded with a CCTV attached to a compound microscope is described. F. composticola engulfs small preys; sucks the intestinal contents while holding them or cuts the body wall of large-sized preys and then feeds on prolapsed organs. Two sexes differ in their efficiencies of predation, a female on an average kills 53 A. avenae as compared to 11 by a male in 24 h. F. composticola feeds and reproduces on mycophagous nematodes and juveniles of root- knot, cyst and citrus nematodes but does not prey upon adult nematodes having coarsely annulated cuticle. Cannibalism in this species is also observed. F. composticola and Seinura paratenuicaudata prey upon each other. Biocontrol potential of F. composticola for managing nematode problems in button mushroom and agricultural crops has also been discussed.

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“I am rather strong on Voyages and Cannibalism”: The other Dickens and other Victorians in Richard Flanagan’s Wanting

Abstract

This paper analyses Richard Flanagan’s novel Wanting (2008) as a narrative informed by a revisionary and critical attitude to nineteenth-century ideologies, which is common to, and, indeed, stereotypical in much neo-Victorian fiction. Drawing on the biographies of two eminent Victorians: Charles Dickens and Sir John Franklin, Flanagan constructs their fictional counterparts as split between a respectable, public persona and a dark, inner self. While all the Victorian characters are represented as “other” than their public image, the focus in the novel, and in this paper, is on Dickens’s struggle to reconcile social propriety with his personal discontent. Flanagan represents this conflict through Dickens’s response to the allegations that starving survivors of Franklin’s ill-fated Arctic expedition resorted to cannibalism. The zeal with which the Victorian writer refuted such reports reveals his own difficulty in living up to social and moral norms. The paper argues that the main link between the different narrative strands in the novel is the challenge they collectively pose to the distinction between the notions of civilization and savagery.

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“Dig, What Makes Your Mouth So Big?”: Off-Modern Nostalgia, Symbolic Cannibalism, and Crossing the Border of the Universal Language in Clarence Major’s “The Slave Trade: View from the Middle Passage”

Abstract

African American literature on the Middle Passage has always challenged white supremacy’s language with its power to define and control. This article demonstrates how the border of such a “Universal Language” is challenged and trespassed in Clarence Major’s ekphrastic poem “The Slave Trade: View from the Middle Passage” in order to communicate – through the implementation of the voice of a disembodied water spirit Mfu – the black perspective on understanding the slave trade and effectively resist the symbolic cannibalism of Western Culture. The trope of antropophagy often appears in Middle Passage poems in the context of (mis)communication (which results in the production of controlling, racist images of blacks) and stands as a sign of Euro-American power to create the historical, hierarchical, racial reality of the Atlantic slave trade in its economic and symbolic dimensions. The strategy implemented by Major in his poetic confrontation with representation of historical slave trade in European and American Fine arts may be classified as “off-modern” (to use Svetlana Boym’s (2001) nomenclature), which immediately places his poem in a “tradition of critical reflection on the modern condition that incorporates nostalgia” as a means of a critical analysis of the heritage and limitations of a given culture. My claim is that the poem’s “off-modern nostalgia” perspective is a version of textualist strategy which Henry Louis Gates (1988) identifies as Signifyin(g). Major/Mfu successfully perforates and destabilizes the assumed objectivity and neutrality of the images of blacks and blackness created and circulated within the realm of the visual arts of the dominant Western Culture. In “The Slave Trade: View from the Middle Passage” Signifyin(g) takes the form of what could be called an ekphrastic (re)interpretation of actual works of art and joins in the critique of essentialist views often associated with understanding of meaning.

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“Neatly Severing The Body From The Head:” Female Abjection In Margaret Atwood’S The Edible Woman

Abstract

In Margaret Atwood’s fiction and poetry, wounded female bodies are a frequently used metaphor for the central characters’ severe identity crises. Atwood’s female protagonists or lyric personae fight marginalization and victimization and often struggle to position themselves in patriarchal society. In order to maintain the illusion of a stable identity, the characters often disavow parts of themselves and surrender to a subversive memory that plays all sorts of tricks on them. However, these “abject” aspects (J. Kristeva, Powers of Horror) cannot be repressed and keep returning, threatening the women’s only seemingly unified selves: In Surfacing, for example, the protagonist suffers from emotional numbness after an abortion. In The Edible Woman, the protagonist’s crisis results in severe eating disorders and in Cat’s Eye and The Robber Bride the central characters’ conflicts are externalized and projected onto haunting ghost-like trickster figures.

In this paper, I will look at various representations of “wounded bodies and wounded minds” in samples of Margaret Atwood’s The Edible Woman, focusing on the intersection of memory and identity and analyzing the strategies for healing that Margaret Atwood offers.

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Female Researchers in Neo-Victorian Fiction

Abstract

Neo-Victorian novelists sometimes use postgraduate students – trainee academics – who research nineteenth-century writers as protagonists. This article discusses four neo-Victorian novels, Lloyd Jones’s Mister Pip (2006), Justine Picardie’s Daphne (2008), A.N. Wilson’s A Jealous Ghost (2005) and Scarlett Thomas’s The End of Mr Y (2006), in which female postgraduate students take the centre stage. In Victorian literature, which mirrors the gender bias in the academic world and in society at large at that time, most scholars are male. The contemporary writers’ choice of female trainee academics is worth investigating as it speaks to the visibly changed gender make-up of contemporary academia. However, this utopian situation is complicated by the fact that the writers have chosen to frustrate the characters’ entry into the world of scholarship by having them leave the university environment altogether before the end of the novel. The fact that these females all choose to depart the university forms a contrast with notions of the university found in Victorian novels, in which leaving or not attending university might have detrimental effects on the characters.

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Gothic Trouble: Cormac McCarthy’s The Road and the Globalized Order

Abstract

The article explores the way American author Cormac McCarthy uses the Gothic genre in his novel The Road as a means to address what has been called “our globalized order,” in particular the way it has turned human beings into consuming or consumed entities. Some dimensions of this globalized order indeed involve the reintroduction of slavery through human trafficking, unprecedented greed and labor capitalism, surveillance and personal data gathering. Hannah Arendt notes in The Origin of Totalitarianism that the disasters of the twentieth century had proved that a globalized order might “produce barbarians from its own midst by forcing millions of people into conditions which, despite all appearances, are the conditions of savages.” The artist’s task is to find the right language and images to address the breaking of the world. French philosopher J. P. Dupuy, for example, has argued that the financial world is a way to contain (contenir) the violence of competition, placing it into acceptable (symbolic) forms away from primal physical competition. McCarthy’s graphic use of Gothic tropes—including cannibalism, the wild forest, the haunted house, the chase, the conflict between light and darkness, the blurring of boundaries between different categories—creates a shock. The article also addresses the larger question of the impact of globalization on Gothic literature, and the impact of Gothic literature on real world matters as it contributes to and reflects upon and challenges global regimes of economic, social and economic power. In other words, what is the cultural work that the Gothic does in the present?

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