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Abdul-Rahman Dirisu, John Ovie Olomukoro and Ifeanyi Maxwell Ezenwa

Abstract

This study assessed the physico-chemical status of sediments in the Agbede Wetlands with the aim to create a reference archive for the Edo North catchment and to further identify the characteristics mostly influenced by the natural and anthropogenic activities going on at the watershed. Nutrients, zinc, nickel and lead were identified to be mostly of anthropogenic origin, while alkali metals and alkaline earth metals were from both anthropogenic and natural sources. The clustering of stations 1 and 4 indicates that the sediment quality in the lentic systems was not completely excluded from the lotic system, suggesting that principal component analysis (PCA) and cluster analysis (CA) techniques are invaluable tools for identifying factors influencing the sediment quality. The mean values of the particle size distribution were in the following order across the ecosystems: sand (61.86–80.53%) > silt (9.75–30.34%) > clay (7.83–13.89%). The contamination of the water bodies was primarily derived from agricultural run-offs and through geochemical weathering of the top soils. Therefore, our analysis indicates that the concentrations of cations, anions and nutrients in the sediments of the lotic and lentic ecosystems in Agbede Wetlands are not at an alarming level.

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Tomasz Olichwer, Marek Wcisło, Stanisław Staśko, Sebastian Buczyński, Magdalena Modelska and Robert Tarka

Abstract

The article presents a numerical model designed for determining groundwater dynamics and water balance of the catchments of the Oziąbel (Czarna Woda) river and the Wołczyński Strumień river in Wołczyn region. Hydrogeological mapping and modelling research covered the area of 238.9 km2. As a result of measurements performed in 2008-2009, flows were determined in major rivers and water table positions were measured at 26 points. In the major part of the area described, the water table, lying at the depth of 1.5-18.7 m, has unconfined character, and the aquifer is built of Neogene (Quaternary) sands and gravels. In the area under study, groundwaters are drawn from 6 wells with total withdrawal of 6133 m3/d. The numerical modelling was performed with the use of Visual Modflow 3.1.0 software. The area was partitioned by a discretization grid with a step size l = 250 m. The conceptual model of the hydrogeological system is based on hydrological data gathered over a period of one year, data from HYDRO bank database, cross-sections and maps. The boundaries of the modelled hydrogeological system were established on the watersheds of the Wołczyński Strumień river and the Oziąbel river, apart from the areas where they run together. The modelled area was extended (271.5 km2) around the Wołczyński Strumień river catchment to achieve a more effective mapping of the anthropogenic impact on its balance and the hydrodynamic system of the catchment area. The structure is characterised by the occurrence of one or rarely two aquifers separated by a pack of Quaternary clays. The investigation produced a detailed water balance and its components.

Open access

Andrzej Wałęga, Dariusz Młyński and Katarzyna Wachulec

REFERENCES [1] A jmal M., W aseem M., W i S., K im T.-W., Evolution of a parsimonious rainfall–runoff model using soil moisture proxies. J. of Hydrology, 2015, 530, 623–633. [2] B altas E.A., D ervos N.A., M imikou M.A., Technical Note: Determination of the SCS initial abstraction ratio in an experimental watershed in Greece , Hydrol. Earth Syst. Sci., 2007, 11, 1825–1829. [3] B anasik K., W oodward D.E., Empirical determination of runoff Curve Number for a small agriculture catchment in Poland , Proceedings of the 2nd Joint Federal

Open access

Muhammad Shafique

urban hydrology and its consequences for receiving waters: A state of the art. Adv. Water Resour; 51 , 261–279. [4] National Research Council. 2009. Urban storm water management in the United States , The National Academies, Washington, D.C. [5] Kaushal, S.S., Belt, K.T. (2012): The urban watershed continuum: Evolving spatial and temporal dimensions. Urban Ecosyst; 15 , 409–435. [6] Nelson, E.J., Booth, D.B. (2002): Sediment sources in an urbanizing, mixed land-use watershed. J. Hydrol; 264 , 51–68. [7] Carey, R.O., Hochmuth, G.J., Martinez

Open access

Jarosław Chormański

, Warszawa 2011. [15] LIU Y.B., GEBREMESKEL S., De SMEDT F., PFISTER L., Flood prediction with the WetSpa model on a catchment scale , [in:] B.S. Wu, Z.Y. Wang, G.Q. Wang, G.H. Huang, H.W. Fang, J.C. Huang, (eds.), Flood Defence , Science Press, New York 2002. [16] LIU Y.B., Development and application of a GIS-based hydrological model for flood prediction and watershed management , Vrije Universiteit Brussel Press, Brussel, 2004, 315. [17] MARTINE G., The State of the World Population 2007 . United Nation Population Fund

Open access

N. Varadarajan and B.K. Purandara

.K., Venkatesh, B., Varadarajan, N. (1997): Water Logging problems in canal commands of Hard Rock region. In: Proceedings of Brain Storming Session on Hydrological problems of Hard Rock Region, organized by NIH, Belgaum on15th March, 1997, pp. 1-4. [4] Dilip, G.D., Varadarajan, N., Purandara, B.K. (2002): Mapping of Groundwater Quality Parameters in GIS Environment. In: Proceedings on International Conference on Hydrology and Watershed Management held at Jawaharlal Nehru Technological University, Hyderabad during 18-20 December, pp. 568-577. [5