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Pero Tutman, Sanja Matić-Skoko, Adem Hamzić, Jakov Dulčić and Branko Glamuzina

Croatian with English summary]. Tutman, P., Glamuzina, B., Dulčić, J. (2013): Monitoring the state of flora and fauna after the forest fire, devastation and dissolution of game-keeping services in Hutovo Blato (lower Neretva river) - chapter fish fauna. Ministry of Environment and Tourism Federation of Bosnia and Herzegovina. 53. [In Croatian]. Tutman, P., Hamzić, A., Hasković, E., Dulčić, J., Pavličević, J., Glamuzina, B. (2016): Neretva rudd Scardinius plotizza Heckel and Kner, 1858 (Cyprinidae), endemic fish species of the Adriatic watershed; biological

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Ieva Siksnāne and Ainis Lagzdiņš

.K. & Rajagopalan, B. (2005). Seasonal Cycle Shifts in Hydroclimatology over the Western United States. Journal of Climate 18, 372–384. 10. Rose, C.W. & Stern, W.R. (1965). The Drainage Component of the Water Balance Equation. Australian Journal of Soil Research 3, 95–100. 11. Shawul, A.A., Alamirew, T. & Dinka M.O. (2013). Calibration and Validation of SWAT Model and Estimation of Water Balance Components of Shaya Mountainous Watershed, Southeastern Ethiopia. Hydrology and Earth System Sciences 10, 13955–13978. 12. Sileika, A. S., Gaigalis, K., Kutra, G

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A. Jelínková and D. Fedorova

geochemistry created by land use in the watershed. Hydrobiologia, 713, 183–197. doi: 10750-013-1506-9. Medici F, Rinaldi G (2008): An updated report on the water chemistry of the lakes of Central Italy. Lake Pollution Research Progress. Nova Science Publishers Inc. New York. Moore B C, Christensen D (2009): Newman Lake restoration: A case study. Part I. Chemical and biological responses to phosphorus control. Lake and Reservoir Management, 25, 337-350. doi: https://doi.org/10.1080/07438140903172907 Naumann E (1929): The scope and chief problems of regional

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Shehata Mohammed Shalaby and Ahmed El-Mageed

. 1986. Costat User's Manual Virgin 3.03. Berkley, California, USA. Coulombe J. J., Farreau L. 1963. A new simple semi-micro method for colourimetric determination of urea. Clin. Chem. 9: 102-108. Crumpton W. G. 2001. Using wetlands for water quality improvement in agricultural watersheds the importance of a watershed scale approach. Water Sci. Technol. 44 (11-12): 559-564. Ecobichon D. J. 2000. Our changing perspectives on benefit and risks of pesticides: a historical overview

Open access

Jan Vymazal

-685. doi: 10.5194/hess-8-673-2004. Fleischer S, Hamrin S, Kindt T, Rydberg L, Stibe L (1987): Coastal eutrophication in Sweden: reducing nitrogen in land runoff. Ambio, 20, 271-272. Fleischer S, Gustavsson A, Joelsson A, Pansar J, Stibe L (1994): Nitrogen retention in created ponds. Ambio, 23, 358-362. Goswami D, Kalita PK, Cooke RAC, McIsaac GF (2009): Nitrate-N loadings through subsurface environment to agricultural drainage ditches in two flat Midwestern (USA) watersheds. Agricultural Water Management, 96, 1021

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P. Kotyza, K. Tomsik, K. Elisova and A. Hornowski

in the Czech Republic, Slovakia and Poland. Dissertation, Czech University of Life Sciences Prague. Kotyza P, Tomsik K (2014): Effects of public support on producer groups establishment in the Czech Republic and Slovakia. AGRIS on-line Papers in Economics and Informatics, 6, 37–47. Lostak M, Kucerova E, Zagata L (2006): Status Quo Analyses (WP3): National status quo report – the Czech Republic. http://www.cofami.org/fileadmin/cofami/documents/WP3_Status_Quo_CZ.pdf . Accessed 15 June, 2016 Lubell M, Schneider M, Scholz JT, Mete M (2002): Watershed

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A. Walmsley, Pavla Vachová and M. Vach

J, Guo S, Huang D, Zhu Q, Ge T, Lei T (2014): Land use and topographic position control soil organic C and N accumulation in eroded hilly watershed of the Loess Plateau. Catena, 120, 64-72. doi: 10.1016/j.catena.2014.04.007.

Open access

Š. Krčílková and V. Janovská

social scales for natural resource management. In: Liu J, Taylor WW (eds): Integrating landscape ecology into natural resource management. Cambridge University Press, Cambridge. Walford N (2002): Agricultural adjustment: adoption of and adaptation to policy reform measures by large-scale commercial farmers. Land Use Policy, 19, 243–257. doi: 10.1016/s0264-8377(02)00018-2. Wannasai N, Shrestha RP (2008): Role of land tenure security and farm household characteristics on land use change in the Prasae Watershed, Thailand. Land Use Policy, 25, 214–224. doi: 10

Open access

J. C. Weber, C. Sotelo Montes, J. Cornelius and J. Ugarte

Abstract

Guazuma crinita is an important timber tree with a rotation age of 6–12 years in the Peruvian Amazon. A provenance/progeny test containing 200 families from seven locations (provenances) in the Aguaytía watershed of Peru was established in three zones in the Aguaytía watershed that differ in mean annual rainfall and soil fertility. Farmers managed the replications as plantations. Replications were divided into two groups at 24 months: faster- and slower-growing plantations. The faster-growing plantations were thinned at 32 months. The objectives of this paper are to determine if genetic variation in growth traits (tree height, stem diameter) is relatively greater in the faster-growing plantations, and if there are significant differences in tree mortality and stem bifurcations among provenances and families at 24, 36 and 48 months. Variation due to provenances and families and heritability of growth traits were consistently greater in the faster-growing plantations. At 48 months, heritability of growth traits was about twice as large in the faster- than in the slower-growing plantations. There were no significant interactions between zones and either provenances or families. Tree mortality and stem bifurcations in the faster-growing plantations generally did not differ significantly among families, but did differ significantly among provenances. Based on these results and considering its rotation age, we recommend that G. crinita families/trees could be selected at 48 months in the faster-growing plantations, the plantations could be transformed into seed orchards and the seed could be used for reforestation throughout the Aguaytía watershed. Results are compared with other tropical hardwoods.

Open access

John C. Weber, Carmen Sotelo Montes, Julio Ugarte and Tony Simons

Abstract

A low-intensity selection strategy was recommended for timber trees in the Peruvian Amazon to maintain genetic variation on farms and produce modest gains in tree growth. The effectiveness of this strategy was evaluated using Calycophyllum spruceanum. Farmers selected 66 mother trees of different ages on farms in seven locations (~20% of all trees in the locations) in one watershed, based on a visual assessment of growth, form and external disease symptoms. Another 66 mother trees were chosen at random. Tree height, stem diameter, stem bifurcations and mortality of progeny of the selected and random groups of mother trees were evaluated at 15, 26 and 38 months in a provenance/progeny test located on farms in the same watershed. Height was significantly greater (10%) in the selected group at 15 months, but it did not differ significantly between the selected and random groups at 26 and 38 months. There were no significant differences in diameter, bifurcations and mortality between the groups. There was significant variation in height and diameter at all measurement ages due to families, and results suggested that variation in bifurcations and mortality due to families was also significant. Based on approximate 95% confidence

intervals, family variances in height and diameter did not differ significantly between the selected and random groups at any measurement age, but evaluations should continue to confirm these tentative conclusions. Some practical implications for tree improvement programs are discussed.