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Australian Wooden Weapons and Tools from the J. V. Daneš Collection in the Náprstek Museum

Abstract

J. V. Daneš’s collection of the National Museum – Náprstek Museum includes over 700 ethnographic objects from the entire Pacific area. The collection is mostly unpublished, and some of the objects never had their provenience established. The present paper introduces 46 indigenous wooden weapons – clubs and sticks, boomerangs, spears, shields and spear throwers – from Australia.

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The Crown of the Divine Child in the Meroitic Kingdom. A Typological Study

Abstract

The crown of the divine child was one of the headdresses that transferred from Egypt to the Meroitic Kingdom. It was integrated in the Egyptian decoration program in the early Ptolemaic time. The first king of Meroe to use this crown in the decoration of the Lion Temple in Musawwarat es-Sufra was Arnekhamani (235-218 BCE). It also appeared later in the sanctuaries of his successors Arkamani II (218-200 BCE) and Adikhalamani (ca. 200-190 BCE) in Dakka and Debod. The Egyptians presented it as the headdress of child gods or the king. In the Kingdom of Meroe the crown was more like a tool to depict the fully legitimised king before he faced the main deity of the sanctuary. To show this the Meroitic artists changed its iconography in such a way that the primarily Egyptian focus on the aspects of youth and rebirth withdrew into the background so that the elements of cosmic, royal and divine legitimacy became the centre of attention. Even if the usage and parts of the iconography were different, the overall meaning remained the same. It was a headdress that combined all elements of the cosmos as well as of royal and divine power.

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Shepespuptah Idu According to Evidence from his Rock-Cut Tomb at Abusir South

Ancient Egyptian Titles, Epithets and Phrases of the Old Kingdom . British Archaeological Reports International Series 866. Oxford: Archaeopress, 2000. LOVEJOY, C. Owen – MEINDL, Richard S. – PRYZBECK, Thomas R. – MENSFORTH, Robert P. Chronological metamorphosis of the auricular surface of the ilium: a new method for the determination of adult skeletal age at death. Am J Phys Anthropol 68/1, 1985, pp. 15–28. MURAIL, Pascal – BRŮŽEK, Jaroslav – HOUËT, Francis – CUNHA, Eugenia. DSP: A tool for probabilistic sex diagnosis using worldwide variability in hip

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People, Space and Culture – Dimensions of Intergenerational Relationships. Introduction

://www.casopispedagogika.sk/rocnik-4/cislo-3/studia_hrozenska.pdf . Chorvát, I. (2006). Rodinné vzťahy, väzby a perspektívy na pozadí procesu modernizácie [Family Relationships, Links and Perspectives in the Background of the Modernisation Process]. In: D. Hamplová, P. Šalamounová, G. Šamanová (Eds.), Životní cyklus. Sociologické a demografické perspektivy [Life-Cycle. Sociological and Demographical Perspectives]. Praha: Sociologický ústav AV ČR (pp. 8–21). Ivan, L., Schiau, M., Buzoianu, C. (2018). The Use of a Drawing Tool to Assess the Implicit Ageism of Students. Slovenský

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Introduction: Enquiries Into Contemporary Ritual Landscapes

Abstract

‘Landscape’ and ‘ritual’ have been largely discussed in the social and human sciences, although their inter-relatedness has gained little scholarly attention. Drawing on earlier studies of ritual and landscape, as well as the authors′ own ethnographic works, ‘ritual landscape’ is suggested here as a useful analytical tool with which to understand how landscapes are produced, and how they, in their turn, produce certain types of being. ‘Ritual landscape’ recognises different modalities of agency, power-relation, knowledge, emotion, and movement. The article shows how the subjectivity of other-than-human beings such as ancestors, earth formations, land, animals, plants and, in general, materiality of ritual contexts, shape landscapes. We argue that ways of perceiving landscape includes a number of material and immaterial aspects indicated by ways of moving through landscapes and interacting with different human and non-human subjects that come to inhabit the world, creating relations and producing agentive ensembles and complexes.

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Die Grenzenlosigkeit der Kulturwissenschaften

Abstract

What keeps cultural studies in motion and, more difficult still, what hold them together? They are continuously animated through so-called ‚turns‘ that in regular intervals open up new perspectives and transform the leading issues and concepts. Such regular innovations are not only due to internal readjustments in terms of methodological changes but are also connected to cultural and social changes. In this way, cultural studies have become an integral part of the transformation of the world as we see and construct it. They are not only a lense through which we observe the transformation of the world, but also a tool with which it is produced. In this active engagement and entanglement with the real world, cultural studies have lost a sense of their professional boundaries. They are constantly extending their realm of research, incorporating avidly new territory. To the extent that cultural studies have embraced the project of cultural self-thematization and self-transformation, they have become as fluid and volatile as culture itself.

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Invektivität - Perspektiven eines neuen Forschungsprogramms in den Kultur- und Sozialwissenschaften

.12.2016). Hornscheidt, Lann (Hg.) (2011): Schimpfwörter - Beschimpfungen - Pejorisierungen. Wie in Sprache Macht und Identitäten verhandelt werden. Frankfurt/M.: Suhrkamp. Jacquet, Jennifer (2015): Is Shame Necessary? New Uses for an Old Tool. New York City: Pantheon. Kanzler, Katja/Scharlaj, Marina (2017): Between Glamorous Patriotism and Reality-TV Aesthetics. Political Communication, Popular Culture, and the Invective Turn in Trump‘s United States and Putin‘s Russia. In: Zeitschrift für Slawistik 62.2: 1-23. Kallmeyer, Werner (1979

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