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Forums as a tool for negotiating knowledge in Higher Education

: Where Old and New Media Collide . New York: New York University Press. Jonassen, D. H. (1994). Thinking Technology: Toward a Constructivist Design Model, Educational Technology , 34 (4), 34-37. Ligorio, M. B. (2009). Identity as a product of knowledge building: The role of mediated dialogue, Qwerty , IV , 1, 33-46. Muukkonen, H., Hakkarainen, K. e Lakkala, M. (1999). Collaborative technology for facilitating Progressive Inquiry: The future Learning Environment tools. In C. Hoadley & J. Roschelle, (Eds.), Proceedings of the CSCL ‘99 conference

Open access
Robotics for soft skills training

., Lepuschitz, W., Koppensteiner, G., Balogh, R. (2016). Robotics in Education. Miglino, O., Lund, H. H., & Cardaci, M. (1999). Robotics as an educational tool. Journal of Interactive Learning Research, 10(1), 25. Miglino, O., Rubinacci, F., Pagliarini, L., & Lund, H. H. (2004). Using artificial life to teach evolutionary biology. Cognitive Processing, 5(2), 123-129. Miglino, O., Di Ferdinando, A., Rega, A., & Ponticorvo, M. (2007). Le nuove macchine per apprendere: simulazioni al computer, robot e videogiochi multi-utente. Alcuni prototipi. Sistemi

Open access
Designing MOOCs in Higher Education. Outcomes of an experimentation at the Catholic University of Milan

. (2010). Io scrivo, tu mi leggi? qualcuno risponderà… lurking e partecipazione nei gruppi di apprendimento on line. Information Sciences for DecisionMaking», 39, 417-429. Fini, A. (2009). The technological dimension of a massive open online course: The Case of the CCK08 course tools. The International Review of Research in Open and Distance Learning, 10(5). Ghislandi, P.M., & Raffaghelli, J.E. (2013). Massive Open Online Courses (MOOC). In D. Persico & V. Midoro (eds.), Pedagogia nell’era digitale (pp. 51-57). Ortona: Menabò. Gibbs, G., & Jenkins, A

Open access
Think big: learning contexts, algorithms and data science

. D. Cielen, D., Meysman, A. D. B.,Ali, M. (2016). Introducing Data Science-Big data, machine learning, and more, using Python tools, New York: Manning, Shelter Island Conway, D. (2010). The data science venn diagram. Dataists Retrieved, from http://www.dataists.com/2010/09/thedata-science-venn-diagram/. Cordoba, R (2016). Foreword. In Daniel, Big data and learning analytics in higher education: Current theory and practice.(pp. vii-viii). Switzerland: Springer Daniel, B. K. (Ed.) (2016). Big data and learning

Open access
A protocol for multidimensional assessment in university online courses

Technology & Society , 15 (4), 114–125. Clark, R.C. & Mayer, R.E. (2007). E-Learning and the Science of Instruction: Proven Guidelines for Consumers and Designers of Multimedia Learning . San Francisco, CA: Pfeiffer. Horton, W. (2006). E-Learning by Design . San Francisco, CA: Pfeiffer. Impedovo, M.A., Ritella, G. & Ligorio, M.B. (2013). Developing Codebooks as a New Tool to Analyze Students’ e-Portfolios. International Journal of ePortfolio , 3 (2), 161-176 Ligorio, M.B. & Sansone N. (2009). Structure of a Blended University Course: Applying

Open access
The Development of Diorama Learning Media Transportation Themes to Develop Language Skill Children’s Group B

Abstract

Early Childhood is the beginning of basic skills development, and one such skill is the language skill. During this time, appropriate stimulus is required to assist the optimal development of children’s language skills, which includes the utilization of effective media learning in kindergarten. Field observation obtained by the researcher in Kindergarten PGRI 3 Tulusayu Tumpang Malang district showed that the only learning media currently used is in the form of visual utilities exhibited by the teacher and does not involve many children in the utilization. The purpose of this research and development is to produce an instructional media diorama that can be used as a language development tool for children in language skill group B. The learning media diorama is expected to help teachers to be more creative in using learning media as interactive game tools.

Open access
Visuo-spatial attention and reading abilities: an action game prototype for dyslexic children

Abstract

The ability to play action videogames – not directly related to phonological or orthographic training – seems to be a teaching tool able to intervene specifically on spatial attention and drastically improve the reading skills of dyslexic children. The MADRIGALE project aims at the design and development of an action game, simultaneously involving both phonological and attention training in order to adapt educational game strategies for special needs.

Within the MADRIGALE project, the design of the prototype was presented at the International Conference on Intelligent Networking and Collaborative Systems, while an experimentation about educational effectiveness of the prototype, conducted using ‘Prove MT2’ as a benchmarking tool for measuring accuracy and speed of reading, was published in the International Journal of Emerging Technologies in Learning (iJET). This paper is an extension of the work presented in SIREM – SIEL 2014 Conference, and presents the results of a Game Evaluation Sheet administered to 50 primary school teachers with experience of dyslexic students

Open access
A tale about Zen philosophy and a motorcycle (that is: OER & MOOC quality)

Abstract

The paper introduces the concept of education quality, mainly based on a shared culture, that is a background for a permanent reflection on a process in which teachers, students, and stakeholders are involved, in a gradual improvement of their competence. People can achieve quality if they head for an open, participatory, iterative trajectory towards personal identity construction through the achievement of satisfaction of a well done work. In this context measurement tools and final quality controls are only a means “toward the end of satisfying the peace of mind of those responsible for the work” (Pirsig, first edition 1974, 2005, p.304).

The also describes the Open Educational Resources and Massive Open Online Courses phenomenon, and presents the most recent studies about the theoretical framework and practical tools available in the scientific literature to scaffold the quality evaluation of open education. The discussion, taking full advantage of the literature presented, recognises that we are still in the infancy of the Open Education quality evaluation, and that the available tools have still to demonstrate their value in the application's fields, through empirical researches.

Open access
Universal Design for Learning: the relationship between subjective simulation, virtual environments, and inclusive education

Abstract

The universality of the educational activities must be in agreement with a series of systems that involve the universality of the subjects who learn and their physical, mental, belief, race and religion differences. The possibilities promoted by an immersive education —made of stimuli aimed at transformation through the use of virtual environments and tools for the use of 3D 360° —are constituted as tools that better interpret the empathic and neurocognitive characteristics of the subjects and therefore the substratum an apprentice on which the cultural dimension is placed, this finding crosses the Universal Design for Learning. Proceeding towards the organization of modular and modular three-dimensional virtual environments responds to all the needs connected to the subject’s formation and constitutes a surprising integrative and inclusive tool in the explanation of the implicit processes of knowledge. We intend to start an experimental phase of study for the possibilities offered verification by this integration, using Federico 3DSU virtual platform to create in its interior, virtual environments involving nine guidelines in CAST in 2008, as well as check out the possibilities pedagogical-didactic.

Open access
The pedagogical concept of laboratory and videogames: learning by having fun

Abstract

There are numerous pedagogues who look at new media with interest (Maragliano 2003; Rivoltella 2006;), paying attention also to the world of computer games and, particularly, to the so-called field of edutainment. The educational, cognitive and metacognitive implications of the sophisticated technology devices involved and their characteristics of creativity, socialisation, practicality and engagement, already recognised by experts in the field, qualify these devices to be considered interesting tools for playing and laboratory learning. They should be used to support the traditional didactic and educational activities in order to outline a new idea of laboratory and school.

Open access