Search Results

1 - 10 of 109 items :

Clear All
Children's Exposure to Irony in the First Four Years of Their Life: What We Learn About the Use of Ironic Comments by Mothers from the Analysis of the Providence Corpus of Childes

vocabulary size in Spanish-learning children. Developmental Science , 11 , 31–39. Huttenlocher, J., Haight, W., Bryk, A., Seltzer, M., & Lyons, T. (1991). Early vocabulary growth: Relation to language input and gender. Developmental Psychology , 27 (2), 236. MacWhinney, B. (2000). The CHILDES project: Tools for analyzing talk: Transcription format and programs (3rd ed.). Mahwah, NJ, US: Lawrence Erlbaum Associates Publishers. MacWhinney, B. (2007). The Talk Bank Project. In J. C. Beal, K. P. Corrigan, & H. L. Moisl (Eds.), Creating and digitizing

Open access
Stance-taking in Spanish-speaking Preschoolers’ Argumentative Interaction

Crítica , 20 (3), 454–462. Linell, P. (1998). Approaching dialogue. Talk, interaction and contexts in dialogical perspectives . Amsterdam/Philadelphia: John Benjamins. MacWhinney, B. (2000). The CHILDES project: Tools for analyzing talk. Volume I: Transcription format and programs . Mahwah, NJ: Lawrence Erlbaum. Matsui, T. (2014). Children’s understanding of certainty and evidentiality. In D. Matthews (Ed.), Pragmatic development in first language acquisition , (pp. 295–316). Amsterdam: John Benjamins. Maynard, D. W. (1985). How children

Open access
“Storyline” or “Associations Pyramid”? A Relationship Between the Difficulty of Educational Methods and Their Effectiveness in Developing Language Creativity Among Pre-School Children

References Bandura, A. (1986). Social foundations of thought and action: a social cognitive theory . New Jersey, NJ: Prentice Hall. Barrett, M. S. (2006). Inventing songs, inventing worlds: the ‘genesis’ of creativity thoughts and activity in young children’s lives. International Journal of Early Years Education , 14 , 201–220. doi: 10.1080/09669760600879920 Barnett, W. S., Jung, K., Yarosz, D. J., Thomas, J., Hornbeck, A., & Burns, S. (2008). Educational effects of the Tools of the Mind curriculum: A randomized trial. Early Childhood

Open access
From Sign Language to Spoken Language? A New Discourse of Language Development in Deaf Children

-Schenck, N., & Kirk, K. I. (2000). A tool for assessing functional use of audition in children: Results in children with the MED-EL COMBI 40 cochlear implant system. The Volta Review , 104 (3), 175–196. Gee, J. P., & Googhart, W. (1988). American Sign Language and the human biological capacity for language. In M. Strong (Ed.), Language Learning and Deafness (pp. 49–74). New York and Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press. Gee, J. P., & Mounty, J. L. (1991). Nativization, variability, and style shifting in the sign language development of deaf children of

Open access
Language as a Tool Creating and Dividing Communities. Dangerous use of Asymmetric Counterconcepts

Abstract

The paper discusses the role of language in shaping social and political reality. Referring to the theory of the sociology of knowledge, symbolic interactionism and theory related to sociolinguistics, the author makes the assumption that language understood as a tool that assigns meaning and defines reality has a decisive influence on individual awareness and knowledge about reality, and simultaneously also on activities undertaken by individuals. Moreover, in the opinion of many theoreticians who represent the above disciplines of knowledge, the knowledge about reality transferred by means of language creates cognitive schemes in awareness through which an individual perceives and defines reality. In this sense it may be said that manipulation of images of reality through language is also a manipulation of social reality

Open access
Utterances as tool-mediated specifications of affordances - ecological pragmatics

Abstract

The established descriptions of information structure assume that the basic cognitive unit is a categorization, and that the basic semantic structure is a predication. Descriptions based on these assumptions, however, cannot provide an adequate analysis of certain types of utterances that form a part of activities. The article presents a solution to this problem based on Wittgenstein’s private language argument and the concept of information in Gibson's theory of affordances. The basic cognitive assumption is that performers of activities attend to variations in the environment, for example visibility, and perceive the states of variations (e.g., 3000 feet). A state is defined as a local, temporary occurrence of a stimulus configuration that specifies an affordance. The basic pragmatic assumption, then, is that performers of activities share the states of variations by means of utterances. This ecological-pragmatic assumption allows for a rethinking of the usefulness of the reference-predicate distinction and bring forward different dimensions of informational analysis of utterances. It is claimed that an informative and accurate analysis of utterances that form a part of activities relies two distinctions: a distinction between a convention based regulation of attention and a convention based specification of an affordance, and a distinction between sharing information and nesting information

Open access
The Study of Language and Conversation with Recurrence Analysis Methods

attractors from mutual information. Physical Review A, 33, 1134-1140. Fusaroli, R., Tylen, C., & R^czaszek-Leonardi, J. (under review). Dialogue as synergy. Haken, H. (1983). Synergetics, an introduction: Nonequilibrium phase transitions and self-organization in physics, chemistry, and biology. New York: Springer. Kelso, J.A.S. (1995). Dynamic patterns: The self-organization of brain and behavior. Cambridge: MIT Press. MacWhinney, B. (2000). The CHILDES project: Tools for analyzing talk. Mahwah, NJ

Open access
The Review of Instruments of Spirituality Measurement in Children

Abstract

Introduction: The aim of the present paper was to point out to the actual overview of tools used to measure spirituality in child age on the basis of an analysis of studies addressing the given issue included in the full-text database EBSCOa PsycINFO.

Purpose: The analysed studies were selected according to the following criteria: a) age range of respondents 6-11 years, that means, younger school age (studies where age of respondents included upper limit of stated age range were also accepted), b) the study included the use of a specific instrument for measuring spirituality (or selected scales), c) the study included the assessment of the psychometric properties of the instruments, d) the study was not qualitative, that means, spirituality was not measured through interviews or open questions.

Methods: Altogether, 15 research studies were analysed on the basis of which 8 instruments used for measuring spirituality in children were identified of which 3 tools (FGLL, Fisher, 2004; YSS, Sifers et al. 2012; SSSC, Stoyles et al. 2012) especially developed for use in child age (6-11 years) and 5 tools (SWBQ, Gomez & Fisher, 2003; RCOPE, Pargament et al. 2000; BMMRS, Fetzer Institute, 1999; SWBS, Ellison, 1983; FACIT-SP-12, Peterman et al. 2002) originally intended for work with the older population and used in the age group 11 years and over. The tools were subsequently described in terms of the theoretical structure, in terms of assessing the psychometric properties and assessing the quality of the tools and in terms of benefits or disadvantages when used with a child’s respondent. The theoretical bases of the instruments pointed out to the problem of the inconsistent and ambiguous definition of the spirituality construct, which is reflected in the different understanding of spirituality and its dimensions.

Conclusion: The psychometric indicators of particular instruments were evaluated and scored on the basis of selected criteria. According to the assessment, the absence of retest reliability verification, verification of some types of validity and the size of the set of validation studies was found out. From the perspective of the appropriateness of the use of tools, some tools seem to be problematic in particular to understand the particular items and omitting factors (for example family, peers) playing an important role in the spirituality of children.

Open access
A blended quantitative-ethnographic method for describing vocal sonification in dance coaching

References Arvaniti, A. (2009). Rhythm, timing, and the timing of rhythm. Phonetica, 66, 46-63. Auvray, M., Lenay, C., & Stewart, J. (2009). Perceptual interactions in a minimalist virtual environment. New Ideas in Psychology, 27, 32-47. Baber, C., Chemero, A., & Hall, J. (2017). What the jeweller’s hand tells the jeweller’s brain: Tool use, creativity, and embodied cognition. Philosophy & Technology. Beckner, C., Ellis, N. C., Blythe, R., Holland, J., Bybee, J., Ke, J., . . . Schoenemann, T

Open access
Adaptation of The Western Aphasia Battery in Bangla

Abstract

Aphasia following an acquired neurological insult necessitates an in-depth evaluation of the primary and secondary language symptoms. Of all the tools available for aphasia diagnosis, the Western Aphasia Battery (WAB; Kertesz, 1982) has proved to be one of the most comprehensive test batteries for describing the aphasia symptom complex. Several authors have pointed out the need for language-specific tools for the assessment of aphasia. But in Bengali, the most prevalent language in eastern India, no formal language assessment tool was available to date. The present study adapted the original WAB in Bengali to give the Bengali WAB (B-WAB). The study was completed in three phases: development, standardization and validation of the B-WAB. The test material was developed preserving the total number of items, however minor changes were made wherever necessary so that it matched the sociolinguistic norms in this part of the country. It was standardized in a group of 150 normal individuals in five different age groups ranging from 18-70 years, and normative values were provided for each subtest for each group. For establishing validity, it was administered to 30 aphasic subjects and the results indicated that the B-WAB was a valid tool for testing individuals with aphasia.

Open access