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Material Excess and Deadly Dwelling in E.L. Doctorow’s Homer and Langley

Abstract

In Homer and Langley, E.L. Doctorow’s 2009 novel of New York City, the author focuses on past Manhattan, which he sees as the epitome of his own self-destructive modern and contemporary society. I would argue that Doctorow acts here mainly to denounce excessive material culture in the context of egotistic, upper-class Manhattan dwelling at the end of the nineteenth century. I would also like to show that the novelist criticizes the idea of material progress along more than a hundred years, from the end of the nineteenth century, when the plot starts, to the beginning of the twenty-first century, when the novel was written. The self-contained, isolated world in the novel is the result of our society’s propensity for excessive production and consumption. At the same time, Homer and Langley brings to mind ideas of exhaustion of the human, who agrees to be literally replaced by objects. The fact that such a phenomenon occurs already at the end of the nineteenth century suggests that there might have never been a plenary moment of being human, as we have long entertained the closest possible relationship and even synthesis with the non-human world of objects and tools.

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“There Is No Map and There Is No Road”: Theorising Best Practice in the Provision of Creative Writing Therapy

. “The Role of Workbooks in the Delivery of Mental Health in Prevention, Psychotherapy and Rehabilitation.” Using Workbooks in Mental Health: Resources in Prevention, Psychotherapy and Rehabilitation for Clinicians and Researchers. Ed. by Luciano L’Abate . New York: The Haworth Reference Press, 2004. 3-52. L’Abate, Luciano and Roy Kern. “Workbooks: Tools for the Expressive Writing Paradigm.” The Writing Cure: How Expressive Writing Promotes Health and Emotional Wellbeing. Ed. Stephen Lepore and Joshua M. Smyth. Washington: American Psychological

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The Latest Battle: Depictions of the Calormen in The Chronicles of Narnia

: Texts and Translations, vol 1. Ed. Malcolm Letts. London: Hakluyt, 1953. Milton, Giles. The Riddle and the Knight: In Search of Sir John Mandeville, the World’s Greatest Traveller. New York: Farrar, 1996. Harris, Paul. “Holy War Looms over Disney’s Narnia Epic.” Observer. Guardian.co.uk. 16 Oct. 2005. Web. 1 Feb. 2017. Root, Jerry. “Tools Inadequate and Incomplete: C.S. Lewis and the Great Religions.” The Pilgrim’s Guide: C.S. Lewis and the Art of Witness. Ed. David Mills. Grand Rapids: Eerdmans, 1998. 221

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“Stop … and Remember”: Memory and Ageing in Kazuo Ishiguro’s Novels

Ishiguro’s The Buried Giant and Chan Koonchung’s The Fat Years .” World Literature Today . 16 Sep. 2015: n. pag. Web. 24 June 2017. Mangum, Teresa. “Literary History as a Tool of Gerontology.” Handbook of the Humanities and Aging . 2nd ed. Ed. Thomas R. Cole, Robert Kastenbaum and Ruth E. Ray. New York: Springer, 2000. Manthorpe, Jill. “Ambivalence and Accommodation: The Fiction of Residential Care.” Writing Old Age. Ed. Julia Johnson. London: Centre for Policy on Ageing, 2004. 23-37. Maylor, Elizabeth A. “Age-Related Changes in Memory.” The

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Communication across cultures: ideological implications of Sam Selvon’s linguistic inventiveness

Abstract

In the postcolonial context, language represents one of the crucial tools of cultural communication and is therefore often a subject of heated discussion. Since language constitutes the framework of cultural interaction, postcolonial authors often challenge the privileged position of Standard English within their writing by modifying and substituting it with new forms and varieties. The Trinidad-born writer Sam Selvon belongs to a handful of Caribbean authors who initiated linguistic experiments in the context of Caribbean literature and is considered one of the first Caribbean writers to employ dialect in a novel. His 1956 novel The Lonely Londoners reflects the possibilities of vernacular experimentation and thus communicates the specific experience of a particular cultural group in an authentic way.

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Literary space in Ismail Kadare’s novel The Palace of Dreams (A semiotic approach)

. 2008. London: Vintage Classics. Lotman, Juri M. 1990. Universe of the Mind, A semiotic Theory of Culture. Great Britain: Indiana University Press, Bloomington and Indianapolis, translated by Ann Shukman, Introduction by Umberto Eko. Louis, H. 2018. “Tools for Text and Image Analysis: An Introduction to Applied Semiotics.” p. 49 – 50. Available at: http://www.signosemio.com/documents/Louis-Hebert-Tools-for-Texts-and-Images.pdf Louis, H., 2006. “The Actantial Model.” In: Signo’s Website, n.d Available at: http

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Aesthetic distance as a form of liminality in selected short stories of American literature

Abstract

Aesthetic distance is a phenomenon that has attracted a considerable amount of attention, especially since the first works of postmodernism came to light. Aesthetic distance is based on creating such works which - using certain artistic tools and techniques - break the illusion and thus inhibit readers from immersing themselves in the literary world portrayed in the work they read. As a result, aesthetic distance creates a liminal space, or an invisible but consciously perceivable border between reality, i.e. the world we live in and fiction, i.e. the world we want to relocate to and enjoy during the reading process. The paper is based on an article by Bjorn Thomassen, in which he presents several types of liminality and states that the typology is not final. My aim is to prove that liminality can occur in literature as well, particularly in works built on aesthetic distance. In this matter, I focus on the reception theory of Wolfgang Iser, who studies literary texts from three perspectives: the text, the reader and the communication between the two. The theory is applied to selected short stories of American literature, which contain illusion-breaking features and thus may be viewed as liminal spaces.

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The Development of Learner Autonomy Through Internet Resources and Its Impact on English Language Attainment

Abstract

Since the arrival of the Internet and its tools, computer technology has become of considerable significance to both teachers and students, and it is an obvious resource for foreign language teaching and learning. The paper presents the results of a study which aimed to determine the effect of the application of Internet resources on the development of learner autonomy as well as the impact of greater learner independence on attainment in English as a foreign language. The participants were 46 Polish senior high school students divided into the experimental group (N = 28) and the control (N = 18) group. The students in the experimental group were subjected to innovative instruction with the use of the Internet and the learners in the control group were taught in a traditional way with the help of the coursebook. The data were obtained by means questionnaires, interviews, learners’ logs, an Internet forum, observations as well as language tests, and they were analyzed quantitatively and qualitatively. The results show that the experimental students manifested greater independence after the intervention and they also outperformed the controls on language tests.

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(Breaking) the Law: Social Control, Self-Help and Violence in the Tale of Gamelyn

ABSTRACT

Fourteenth century England experienced social changes which influenced the attitude to crown law and triggered a growing distrust to law and its representatives. The progressing development of the gentry complicated the defining of offences, and diversified the means of punishing them. The Tale of Gamelyn presents a conflict between two brothers, sons of a knight, which went beyond the confinements of the household, transforming itself into a conflict between law and justice. Their feud is a cross-complaint concerning land, which soon turns into a spiral of violence in which one brother uses law to control and punish, and the other uses crime and violence to achieve justice. Using Donald Black’s theory of the sociological geometry of violence (2004) and of crime as social control (1983), this article will analyze the law in the tale as a tool of social control represented by Johan, and justice acquired with the use of self-help by Gamelyn. The article will attempt to prove that the story presents a complex relation between justice and law pinned across the varied spectrum of social classes, which Gamelyn changes a number of times, and will argue that the tale is an affirmation of violence as an underlying force of both law and justice, differing in presentation and realization according to social class.

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The Individual and the Nation in Ngũgĩ wa Thiong'o’s Early Writing

Abstract

In its essence, postcolonial literature evolved as an opposition to colonial discourse and ideological representation of the colonized subject inherent in colonial narratives. Springing out of the need to reconceptualize and reconstitute their communities, postcolonial writers often addressed the pressing historical and political issues of that time in their writing. In its early stages, postcolonial literature was therefore often marked by a strong sense of nationalism, interweaving fictional stories with the public narrative of pre-independence ideology. The paper seeks to explore the border between the public and the private in the early novels of the Kenyan writer Ngũgĩ wa Thiong'o. Just as his contemporaries in other colonized countries, Ngũgĩ wa Thiong'o tends to utilize literature as a powerful tool for raising national awareness. The pre-independence period, in which Ngũgĩ’s novels are set, is marked by a certain degree of romanticism and idealism, yet there is also an underlying sense of doom. Drawing on the cultural roots and mythology of his community, the writer steers his narrative in the direction of a larger, public discourse, suggesting that “the individual finds the fullest development of his personality when he is working in and for the community as a whole”. Therefore, the public/private dichotomy stands at the very centre of his writing, proving the rootedness of the individual in the public space.

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