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Material Excess and Deadly Dwelling in E.L. Doctorow’s Homer and Langley

Abstract

In Homer and Langley, E.L. Doctorow’s 2009 novel of New York City, the author focuses on past Manhattan, which he sees as the epitome of his own self-destructive modern and contemporary society. I would argue that Doctorow acts here mainly to denounce excessive material culture in the context of egotistic, upper-class Manhattan dwelling at the end of the nineteenth century. I would also like to show that the novelist criticizes the idea of material progress along more than a hundred years, from the end of the nineteenth century, when the plot starts, to the beginning of the twenty-first century, when the novel was written. The self-contained, isolated world in the novel is the result of our society’s propensity for excessive production and consumption. At the same time, Homer and Langley brings to mind ideas of exhaustion of the human, who agrees to be literally replaced by objects. The fact that such a phenomenon occurs already at the end of the nineteenth century suggests that there might have never been a plenary moment of being human, as we have long entertained the closest possible relationship and even synthesis with the non-human world of objects and tools.

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“There Is No Map and There Is No Road”: Theorising Best Practice in the Provision of Creative Writing Therapy

. “The Role of Workbooks in the Delivery of Mental Health in Prevention, Psychotherapy and Rehabilitation.” Using Workbooks in Mental Health: Resources in Prevention, Psychotherapy and Rehabilitation for Clinicians and Researchers. Ed. by Luciano L’Abate . New York: The Haworth Reference Press, 2004. 3-52. L’Abate, Luciano and Roy Kern. “Workbooks: Tools for the Expressive Writing Paradigm.” The Writing Cure: How Expressive Writing Promotes Health and Emotional Wellbeing. Ed. Stephen Lepore and Joshua M. Smyth. Washington: American Psychological

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The Latest Battle: Depictions of the Calormen in The Chronicles of Narnia

: Texts and Translations, vol 1. Ed. Malcolm Letts. London: Hakluyt, 1953. Milton, Giles. The Riddle and the Knight: In Search of Sir John Mandeville, the World’s Greatest Traveller. New York: Farrar, 1996. Harris, Paul. “Holy War Looms over Disney’s Narnia Epic.” Observer. Guardian.co.uk. 16 Oct. 2005. Web. 1 Feb. 2017. Root, Jerry. “Tools Inadequate and Incomplete: C.S. Lewis and the Great Religions.” The Pilgrim’s Guide: C.S. Lewis and the Art of Witness. Ed. David Mills. Grand Rapids: Eerdmans, 1998. 221

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“Stop … and Remember”: Memory and Ageing in Kazuo Ishiguro’s Novels

Ishiguro’s The Buried Giant and Chan Koonchung’s The Fat Years .” World Literature Today . 16 Sep. 2015: n. pag. Web. 24 June 2017. Mangum, Teresa. “Literary History as a Tool of Gerontology.” Handbook of the Humanities and Aging . 2nd ed. Ed. Thomas R. Cole, Robert Kastenbaum and Ruth E. Ray. New York: Springer, 2000. Manthorpe, Jill. “Ambivalence and Accommodation: The Fiction of Residential Care.” Writing Old Age. Ed. Julia Johnson. London: Centre for Policy on Ageing, 2004. 23-37. Maylor, Elizabeth A. “Age-Related Changes in Memory.” The

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From the manuscript to the screen: Implementing electronic editions of mediaeval handwritten material

From the manuscript to the screen: Implementing electronic editions of mediaeval handwritten material

This paper describes the electronic editing of the Middle English material housed in the Hunterian Collection at Glasgow University Library (GUL), a joint project undertaken by the universities of Málaga, Glasgow, Oviedo, Murcia and Jaén which pursues the compilation of an electronic corpus of mediaeval Fachprosa in the vernacular (http://hunter.filosofia.uma.es/manuscripts). The paper therefore addresses the concept of electronic editing as applied to The corpus of Late Middle English scientific prose with the following objectives: (a) to describe the editorial principles and the theoretical implications adopted; and (b) to present the digital layout and the tool implemented for data retrieval. A diplomatic approach is then proposed wherein the editorial intervention is kept to a minimum. Accordingly, features such as lineation, punctuation and emendations are every now and then accurately reproduced as by the scribe's hand whilst abbreviations are yet expanded in italics. GUL MS Hunter 497, holding a 15th-century English version of Aemilius Macer's De viribus herbarum, will be used as a sample demonstration (Calle-Martín - Miranda-García, forthcoming).

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The Development of Learner Autonomy Through Internet Resources and Its Impact on English Language Attainment

Abstract

Since the arrival of the Internet and its tools, computer technology has become of considerable significance to both teachers and students, and it is an obvious resource for foreign language teaching and learning. The paper presents the results of a study which aimed to determine the effect of the application of Internet resources on the development of learner autonomy as well as the impact of greater learner independence on attainment in English as a foreign language. The participants were 46 Polish senior high school students divided into the experimental group (N = 28) and the control (N = 18) group. The students in the experimental group were subjected to innovative instruction with the use of the Internet and the learners in the control group were taught in a traditional way with the help of the coursebook. The data were obtained by means questionnaires, interviews, learners’ logs, an Internet forum, observations as well as language tests, and they were analyzed quantitatively and qualitatively. The results show that the experimental students manifested greater independence after the intervention and they also outperformed the controls on language tests.

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(Breaking) the Law: Social Control, Self-Help and Violence in the Tale of Gamelyn

ABSTRACT

Fourteenth century England experienced social changes which influenced the attitude to crown law and triggered a growing distrust to law and its representatives. The progressing development of the gentry complicated the defining of offences, and diversified the means of punishing them. The Tale of Gamelyn presents a conflict between two brothers, sons of a knight, which went beyond the confinements of the household, transforming itself into a conflict between law and justice. Their feud is a cross-complaint concerning land, which soon turns into a spiral of violence in which one brother uses law to control and punish, and the other uses crime and violence to achieve justice. Using Donald Black’s theory of the sociological geometry of violence (2004) and of crime as social control (1983), this article will analyze the law in the tale as a tool of social control represented by Johan, and justice acquired with the use of self-help by Gamelyn. The article will attempt to prove that the story presents a complex relation between justice and law pinned across the varied spectrum of social classes, which Gamelyn changes a number of times, and will argue that the tale is an affirmation of violence as an underlying force of both law and justice, differing in presentation and realization according to social class.

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OLD ENGLISH ADJECTIVAL AFFIXATION: STRUCTURE AND FUNCTION

Grammar. In Maria Ángeles Gómez González, Francisco Ruiz de Mendoza Ibáñez & Francisco Gonzálvez García (eds.), Form and function in language: Functional, cognitive and applied perspectives. Amsterdam: John Benjamins. Forthcoming. Martín Arista, Javier & Victoria Martín de la Rosa. 2006. Old English semantic primes: Substantives, determiners and quantifiers. ATLANTIS 17. 9-28. Mel’čuk, Igor. 1996. Lexical functions: A tool for the description of lexical relations in the lexicon. In Leo Wanner (ed.), Lexical functions in lexicography and

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Long Lexical Bundles and Standardisation in Historical Legal Texts

References Meurman-Solin, Anneli (ed.) 1995 The Helsinki Corpus of Older Scots [HCOS]. Helsinki: University of Helsinki. Williamson, Keith 2008 The Edinburgh Corpus of Older Scots [ECOS]. Edinburgh: University of Edinburgh. Ari, Omer 2006 “Review of three software programs designed to identify lexical bundles”, Language Learning and Technology 10/1: 30-37. Baron, Alistair - Paul Rayson 2008 “VARD 2: A tool for dealing with spelling variation in historical corpora”, Proceedings of

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