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The Yard and Korean Shakespeare

Abstract

Since the New Globe Theatre opened in 1996, they have used the yard as an acting area or entrances. Even though the authenticity of using the yard is disputable, nobody denies that the yard must be a very effective tool for performing Shakespeare at the Globe Theatre. The yard is an essential part of traditional Korean theatre, called “talchum (mask dance)” or “talnori (mask play).” The yard is its stage as well as the auditorium. Therefore, the players are surrounded by the audience, and the players can, and often do interact with the audience, speaking to the audience, or treating them as players, or acting as if they were some of the audience. The theatrical style of using the yard has much influenced the modern theatre of Korea. And many Korean directors including Oh Tae-suk, Yang Jung-ung, Sohn Jin-chaek, Park Sung-hwan, and myself, have applied the yard techniques to their Shakespearean productions. Korean Shakespearean productions, which use the yard actively, can be more evidence that the yard must be an effective tool for Shakespeare, not only at the Globe Theatre but also at any kind of theatres of today. No one knows whether Shakespeare actually used the yard or not. But the fact that many Shakespearean productions have used the yard successfully, implies that Shakespeare's texts themselves have enough room for the yard.

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Material Excess and Deadly Dwelling in E.L. Doctorow’s Homer and Langley

Abstract

In Homer and Langley, E.L. Doctorow’s 2009 novel of New York City, the author focuses on past Manhattan, which he sees as the epitome of his own self-destructive modern and contemporary society. I would argue that Doctorow acts here mainly to denounce excessive material culture in the context of egotistic, upper-class Manhattan dwelling at the end of the nineteenth century. I would also like to show that the novelist criticizes the idea of material progress along more than a hundred years, from the end of the nineteenth century, when the plot starts, to the beginning of the twenty-first century, when the novel was written. The self-contained, isolated world in the novel is the result of our society’s propensity for excessive production and consumption. At the same time, Homer and Langley brings to mind ideas of exhaustion of the human, who agrees to be literally replaced by objects. The fact that such a phenomenon occurs already at the end of the nineteenth century suggests that there might have never been a plenary moment of being human, as we have long entertained the closest possible relationship and even synthesis with the non-human world of objects and tools.

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Translation as Rewriting: Cultural Theoretical Appraisal of Shakespeare’s Macbeth in the Ewe language of West Africa

Abstract

The cultural turn in translation theory brought attention to the idea that translation is not a purely linguistic phenomenon but one that is also constrained by culture. The cultural turn considers translation as a rewriting of an original text. In this paper, I attempt to find reflections of the cultural turn in a translation into an African language. As such, the paper reads William Shakespeare’s Macbeth in the Ewe language of West Africa, Shakespeare ʄe Makbet, as rewriting. Walter Blege is the translator and the Bureau of Ghana Languages is the publisher of the target text meant for Ewe language audience in Ghana. The target text is for learning and acquiring the Ewe language especially in the area of developing reading comprehension skills. Following Andre Lefevere and Jeremy Munday, this paper suggests that Shakespeare ʄe Makbet is a rewritten text as it follows some cultural constraints in its translation. The study provides insight into the motivations for some of the translator/rewriter’s choices. Given the less attention paid to the Ewe language and many other African languages, the paper proposes translation as a socio-psychological tool for revitalizing interest in the learning and acquisition of African and other lesser-known languages.

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“There Is No Map and There Is No Road”: Theorising Best Practice in the Provision of Creative Writing Therapy

. “The Role of Workbooks in the Delivery of Mental Health in Prevention, Psychotherapy and Rehabilitation.” Using Workbooks in Mental Health: Resources in Prevention, Psychotherapy and Rehabilitation for Clinicians and Researchers. Ed. by Luciano L’Abate . New York: The Haworth Reference Press, 2004. 3-52. L’Abate, Luciano and Roy Kern. “Workbooks: Tools for the Expressive Writing Paradigm.” The Writing Cure: How Expressive Writing Promotes Health and Emotional Wellbeing. Ed. Stephen Lepore and Joshua M. Smyth. Washington: American Psychological

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The Latest Battle: Depictions of the Calormen in The Chronicles of Narnia

: Texts and Translations, vol 1. Ed. Malcolm Letts. London: Hakluyt, 1953. Milton, Giles. The Riddle and the Knight: In Search of Sir John Mandeville, the World’s Greatest Traveller. New York: Farrar, 1996. Harris, Paul. “Holy War Looms over Disney’s Narnia Epic.” Observer. Guardian.co.uk. 16 Oct. 2005. Web. 1 Feb. 2017. Root, Jerry. “Tools Inadequate and Incomplete: C.S. Lewis and the Great Religions.” The Pilgrim’s Guide: C.S. Lewis and the Art of Witness. Ed. David Mills. Grand Rapids: Eerdmans, 1998. 221

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Shakespeare in Digital Games and Virtual Worlds

. Shakespeare and the Moving Image: The Plays on Film and Television. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1994. Georgopoulou, Xenia. Gender Issues in Shakespeare’s Theatre and the Renaissance. Athens: Papazisis, 2010. Habgood, Matthew Peter Jacob. “The Effective Integration of Digital Games and Learning Content” Diss. University of Nottingham, 2007. Heliö, Satu. “Role-Playing: A Narrative Experience and a Mindset” Beyond Role and Play: Tools, Toys and Theory for Harnessing the Imagination. Eds. Markus Montola and Jaakko Stenros. Helsinki Ropecon Ry

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“Stop … and Remember”: Memory and Ageing in Kazuo Ishiguro’s Novels

Ishiguro’s The Buried Giant and Chan Koonchung’s The Fat Years .” World Literature Today . 16 Sep. 2015: n. pag. Web. 24 June 2017. Mangum, Teresa. “Literary History as a Tool of Gerontology.” Handbook of the Humanities and Aging . 2nd ed. Ed. Thomas R. Cole, Robert Kastenbaum and Ruth E. Ray. New York: Springer, 2000. Manthorpe, Jill. “Ambivalence and Accommodation: The Fiction of Residential Care.” Writing Old Age. Ed. Julia Johnson. London: Centre for Policy on Ageing, 2004. 23-37. Maylor, Elizabeth A. “Age-Related Changes in Memory.” The

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The Dramatic Arc of the Theory of FSP: A Tentative Diachronic Excursion

Abstract

The theory of functional sentence perspective (FSP) and its research methods have been considered one of the prominent tools of discourse analysis and information processing. It is widely known that, combining the approaches adopted both by formalists and functionalists, the theory of FSP draws on the findings presented by the scholars of the Prague Circle. The father of FSP himself - Jan Firbas - drew on the findings of his predecessor, Vilem Mathesius, who formulated the basic principles of what was to be labelled FSP only later. Apart from the principal FSP representatives and more recent followers (as a rule associated with Prague or Brno universities), this homage paper overviews somewhat less familiar - yet significant - pioneers in the field of theories of information structure, viz. Henri Weil, Samuel Brassai, Georg von der Gabelentz and Anton Marty. It will discuss some of their writings and achievements that were forming (and inspiring) the theory of FSP.

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From the manuscript to the screen: Implementing electronic editions of mediaeval handwritten material

From the manuscript to the screen: Implementing electronic editions of mediaeval handwritten material

This paper describes the electronic editing of the Middle English material housed in the Hunterian Collection at Glasgow University Library (GUL), a joint project undertaken by the universities of Málaga, Glasgow, Oviedo, Murcia and Jaén which pursues the compilation of an electronic corpus of mediaeval Fachprosa in the vernacular (http://hunter.filosofia.uma.es/manuscripts). The paper therefore addresses the concept of electronic editing as applied to The corpus of Late Middle English scientific prose with the following objectives: (a) to describe the editorial principles and the theoretical implications adopted; and (b) to present the digital layout and the tool implemented for data retrieval. A diplomatic approach is then proposed wherein the editorial intervention is kept to a minimum. Accordingly, features such as lineation, punctuation and emendations are every now and then accurately reproduced as by the scribe's hand whilst abbreviations are yet expanded in italics. GUL MS Hunter 497, holding a 15th-century English version of Aemilius Macer's De viribus herbarum, will be used as a sample demonstration (Calle-Martín - Miranda-García, forthcoming).

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Gender, Humour and Transgression in Canadian Women’s Theatre

Abstract

Are humour and laughter gender-specific? The simple answer, like most everything that is ideological, is “yes”. Many feminists in recent years have grappled with the question of humour and how it is often the site of much contestation when it comes to women using it as a tool of transgression. This paper probes the seemingly timeless antipathy between humour and representations of femininity through recourse to performance and theories of the body. This article holds the term “woman” up to scrutiny while simultaneously examining the persistence of both critical and philosophical recalcitrance and the way humour continues to function in both gendered and violent ways. How does gender “do” or “undo” humour? Laughter is no simple matter for women, due to the legacy of profoundly polarized and hyper-sexualized historical ambivalence between femininity and laughter. Acknowledging the problematic nature of the category “woman”, and after clearing some terminological distinctions (comedy, humour, irony, satire, and parody), this article investigates humour’s complicated and volatile relationship to gender and the way the laughing body of women on stage presents a fascinating double helix of sexual aggression and power

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