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Conceptualization of motion in communicative space in English

Abstract

The study of space and motion in space as well as its further verbalization remains one of the topical issues of present-day linguistic research, though motion in personal space still needs a more detailed analysis. This paper analyzes English verbalization of movement in communicative space from a cognitive linguistic perspective. It aims at revealing specific features of the constructions under study by applying such a theoretical tool of cognitive linguistics as image schemas.

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German causative events with placement verbs

Psycholinguistics, p. 10-24. De Knop, S. (2014). Conceptual tools for the description and the acquisition of the German posture verb sitzen. In Learner corpus research, cognitive linguistics and second language acquisition, special issue of corpus linguistics and linguistic theory De Knop, S. & Meunier, F. (eds.), 11 (1), p. 127-160. De Knop, S. & Gallez, F. (2013). Manner of motion: A privileged dimension of German expressions. In Compendium of cognitive linguistics research. Fuyin Li, T. (ed.), 2, p. 25-40. De Knop, S. & Mollica

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The elusive ellipsis – the complex history of a vague grammatical concept in need of empirical grounding

englischen politischen Reden. In Germanistische Mitteilungen. Zeitschrift für Deutsche Sprache, Literatur und Kultur, 40.1: Deutsch kontrastiv, p. 31-50. Merchant, J. (2010). Three kinds of ellipsis. In Context-dependence, perspective, and relativity. Recanati, F., Stojanovic, I. & Villanueva, N. (eds.). Berlin: de Gruyter, p. 141-192. Müller, C. & Strube, M. (2006). Multi-level annotation of linguistic data with MMAX2. In Corpus technology and language pedagogy. New resources, new tools, new methods. Braun, S., Kohn, K. & Mukherjee, J. (eds

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Cognitive and semiotic dimensions of paradoxicality in contemporary American poetic discourse

? Mobility as an ideology. In Cultures of mobilities: Everyday life, communication and politics: Materials of 2010C-MUS conference, Aalborg, Denmark, October 27-29, p. 25-27. Morozova, O. (2017). Monomodal and multimodal instantiations of conceptual metaphors of Brexit. In Lege artis. Language yesterday, today, tomorrow. The journal of University of SS Cyril and Methodius in Trnava . Warsaw: De Gruyter Open, II (2), December 2017, p. 250-283. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1515/lart-2017-0017 Nørgaard, N. (2010). Multimodality: Extending the stylistic tool-kit. In

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Meta-parody in contemporary Russian media: viewpoint blending behind Dmitry Bykov’s 2009 poem “Infectious”

approach to a multifaceted phenomenon (Applications of cognitive linguistics, 21). Feyaerts, K., Veale T. & Forceville C. (eds.). Berlin-New York: Mouton de Gruyter, p. 293-310. Cap, P. (2014). Expanding CDS methodology by cognitive-pragmatic tools: proximization theory and public space discourses. In Contemporary studies in critical discourse analysis. Hart, C. & Cap, P. (eds.). London: Bloomsbury, p. 189-210. Cavanagh, C. (2010). Lyric poetry and modern politics: Russia, Poland, and the West. New Haven and London: Yale University Press

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The phonesthetics of blends: A lexicographic study of cognitive blends in the OED

Cognitive Semantics. Corpusdriven approaches . Berlin: Mouton de Gruyter, 1–42. Glynn, Dylan (2014a). Correspondence analysis. An exploratory technique for identifying usage patterns. Glynn, Dylan & Justyna A. Robinson, eds. Corpus Methods for Semantics. Quantitative Studies in Polysemy and Synonymy. Amsterdam: John Benjamins, 133–179. Glynn, Dylan (2014b). Techniques and tools. Corpus methods and statistics for semantics. Glynn, Dylan & Justyna A. Robinson, eds. Corpus Methods for Semantics. Quantitative Studies in Polysemy and Synonymy . Amsterdam: John

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in ExELL
Using counterfactuals to display facts – the case of satirical humor

Abstract

Satire has not been given the humorologists’ attention to an extent that would do justice to the amount of humor satire actually holds. Therefore, the intention of this paper is to shed light on satire as humorous discourse, with an emphasis on counterfactuals. Interestingly enough, counterfactuals oppose the actual state of affairs; rhetorically however, they show potential to reveal the truth. Political satire is an area of conflict between truth and falsehood which is exactly why this type of satire is discussed in this paper. Tools from Cognitive Linguistics – framing and blending – are utilized to show to what extent counterfactuals are actually false and how they essentially contribute to satire. Examples of political satire are selected from Comedy Central’s The Daily Show.

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in ExELL
The formal method in Germany and Russia: the beginnings of European psycholinguistics

Abstract

German–Austrian psychology is a direct source of the European formalism movement both in the German context (Germany, Austria) as well as in Russia. This interest of the formalists in the corporeal component of linguistic and literary production has resulted in a particular research stream, which could be defined as a ‘linguo-somatic orientation’. In particular, this is the case of Alois Riegl’s [1] perceptive ‘tactile–optical’ method; Adolf von Hildebrand’s [2] architectonic conception; Konrad Fiedler’s [3] ‘sensorial aesthetics’; W. Wölfflin’s [4] ‘basic concepts’ of the art history, W. Worringer’s [5] psychological arts typology as well as Oskar Walzel’s sound-corporeal poetics elaborated during 1920 [6]. Within Russian formalism, psychological notions (such as ‘representation’, ‘sensation’, ‘apperception’, ‘series’, ‘clear and dark zones of consciousness’, ‘verbal gestures’ and ‘sound gestures’) are fundamental in nearly all the formalist conceptions (Viktor Šklovskij, Evgenij Polivanov, Lev Jakubinskij, Osip Brik, Boris Eixenbaum and Jurij Tynianov). This psychological background constitutes a rather heterogeneous constellation composed of psychological aesthetics and psychological linguistics of the second half of the 19th century. Independently of its intrinsic theoretical values, the formalist way of thinking about language and literature is based on the implicit dominance of psychology, which takes its sense only with respect to the German cognitive tradition, appropriated by the Geisteswissenschaften of this time. In this respect, European formalism participates in the large movement of psychologisation of the humanities. To this extent, the case of Russian formalism is really representative: it invites the rethinking of the genealogy of European structuralism in general. This accumulation of conceptual tools borrowed from the German psychological tradition also reveals a cognitive charge of the formalist theories. The latter constitute a conceptual link between the properly psychological past of the European Geisteswissenschaften and the ‘cognitive’ future of the actual research programmes. Beyond the borrowing of conceptual tools from the psychological trend, the formal method has found in psychology its inspiration for producing new models of analysis. This intrinsically cognitivist dimension of the formalist programme explains its late success during the 1950s–1960s, the period often and abusively called the period of the cognitivist revolution. In reality, it deals with the re-emergence of the research programme of the cognitivist sciences, rather exhaustively formulated by the German psychological tradition..

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Genetic analysis of cabbages and related cultivated plants using the bag-of-words model

Abstract

In this study, we aim to introduce the analytical method bag-of-words, which is mainly used as a tool for the analysis (document classification, authorship attribution and so on; e.g. [1, 2]) of natural languages. Quantitative linguistic methods similar to bag-of-words (e.g. Damerau–Levenshtein distance in the paper by Serva and Petroni [3]) have been used for the mapping of language evolution within the field of glottochronology. We attempt to apply this method in the field of biological taxonomy – on the Brassicaceae (Cruciferae) family. The subjects of our interest are well-known cultivated crops, which at first sight are morphologically very different and culturally perceived as objects of different interests (e.g. oil from oilseed rape, turnip as animal feed and cabbage as a side dish). Despite the phenotypic divergence of these crops, they are very closely related, which is not morphologically obvious at first sight. For this reason, we think that Brassicaceae crops are appropriate illustrative examples for introducing the method. For the analysis, we use genetic markers (internal transcribed spacer [ITS] and maturase K [matK]). Until now, the bag-of-words model has not been used for biological taxonomisation purposes; therefore, the results of the bagof-words analysis are compared with the existing very well-developed Brassica taxonomy. Our goal is to present a method that is suitable for language development reconstruction as well as possibly being usable for biological taxonomy purposes.

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Towards an Encyclopaedia of Sequence Biology

. Translation in Bacillus subtilis: Roles and trends of initiation and termination, insights from a genome analysis. Nucleic Acids Research , 27, 3567–3576. [26] Moll, I., Grill, S., Gualerzi, C.O., et al., 2002. Leaderless mRNAs in bacteria: Surprises in ribosomal recruitment and translational control. Molecular Microbiology , 43 (1), 239–246. [27] Genome database, available at: < https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/genome >. [28] Ambrosini, G., Groux, R., Bucher, P., 2018. PWMScan: A fast tool for scanning entire genomes with a position-specific weight matrix

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