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Communication across cultures: ideological implications of Sam Selvon’s linguistic inventiveness

Abstract

In the postcolonial context, language represents one of the crucial tools of cultural communication and is therefore often a subject of heated discussion. Since language constitutes the framework of cultural interaction, postcolonial authors often challenge the privileged position of Standard English within their writing by modifying and substituting it with new forms and varieties. The Trinidad-born writer Sam Selvon belongs to a handful of Caribbean authors who initiated linguistic experiments in the context of Caribbean literature and is considered one of the first Caribbean writers to employ dialect in a novel. His 1956 novel The Lonely Londoners reflects the possibilities of vernacular experimentation and thus communicates the specific experience of a particular cultural group in an authentic way.

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Literary space in Ismail Kadare’s novel The Palace of Dreams (A semiotic approach)

. 2008. London: Vintage Classics. Lotman, Juri M. 1990. Universe of the Mind, A semiotic Theory of Culture. Great Britain: Indiana University Press, Bloomington and Indianapolis, translated by Ann Shukman, Introduction by Umberto Eko. Louis, H. 2018. “Tools for Text and Image Analysis: An Introduction to Applied Semiotics.” p. 49 – 50. Available at: http://www.signosemio.com/documents/Louis-Hebert-Tools-for-Texts-and-Images.pdf Louis, H., 2006. “The Actantial Model.” In: Signo’s Website, n.d Available at: http

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Aesthetic distance as a form of liminality in selected short stories of American literature

Abstract

Aesthetic distance is a phenomenon that has attracted a considerable amount of attention, especially since the first works of postmodernism came to light. Aesthetic distance is based on creating such works which - using certain artistic tools and techniques - break the illusion and thus inhibit readers from immersing themselves in the literary world portrayed in the work they read. As a result, aesthetic distance creates a liminal space, or an invisible but consciously perceivable border between reality, i.e. the world we live in and fiction, i.e. the world we want to relocate to and enjoy during the reading process. The paper is based on an article by Bjorn Thomassen, in which he presents several types of liminality and states that the typology is not final. My aim is to prove that liminality can occur in literature as well, particularly in works built on aesthetic distance. In this matter, I focus on the reception theory of Wolfgang Iser, who studies literary texts from three perspectives: the text, the reader and the communication between the two. The theory is applied to selected short stories of American literature, which contain illusion-breaking features and thus may be viewed as liminal spaces.

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The Individual and the Nation in Ngũgĩ wa Thiong'o’s Early Writing

Abstract

In its essence, postcolonial literature evolved as an opposition to colonial discourse and ideological representation of the colonized subject inherent in colonial narratives. Springing out of the need to reconceptualize and reconstitute their communities, postcolonial writers often addressed the pressing historical and political issues of that time in their writing. In its early stages, postcolonial literature was therefore often marked by a strong sense of nationalism, interweaving fictional stories with the public narrative of pre-independence ideology. The paper seeks to explore the border between the public and the private in the early novels of the Kenyan writer Ngũgĩ wa Thiong'o. Just as his contemporaries in other colonized countries, Ngũgĩ wa Thiong'o tends to utilize literature as a powerful tool for raising national awareness. The pre-independence period, in which Ngũgĩ’s novels are set, is marked by a certain degree of romanticism and idealism, yet there is also an underlying sense of doom. Drawing on the cultural roots and mythology of his community, the writer steers his narrative in the direction of a larger, public discourse, suggesting that “the individual finds the fullest development of his personality when he is working in and for the community as a whole”. Therefore, the public/private dichotomy stands at the very centre of his writing, proving the rootedness of the individual in the public space.

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Desire under the tribe in Nuruddin Farah’s A Naked Needle and Ken N. Kamoche’s “Secondhand Wife”

Abstract

This paper will address the notion of desire in Ken N. Kamoche’s “Secondhand Wife” and Nuruddin Farah’s A Naked Needle; it will be centered on the idea of men’s and women’s sexual desire as caught between being controlled and willing to be free. Desire will be studied as being controlled by the tribe in Kenya and Somalia, which channels men’s and women’s desire into pre-made forms. These channels of desire approved by the tribe are contested in Kenya and Somalia by both men and women. Desire is then situated between collective manipulation and individual freedom. On the one hand, desire will be linked to the idea of power relations that is desire as a tool to establish and support the power of the tribe. Desire is no longer a matter of natural instinct and feeling but that of a constructed dialectic of power. On the other hand, desire under the tribe is also about a refusal of the tribal control of desire and a yearn for liberating desire, which manifests itself in different manners such as the refusal of restrictions on marriage with non-Muslims in Somalia, the rejection of arranged marriage for both men and women, or prostitution as the body avenging itself through itself.

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Full Access to Cultural Spaces (FACS): Mapping and evaluating museum access services using mobile eye-tracking technology

.). Researching Audio Description New Approaches. Palgrave Macmillan: London, pp. 11-33. Holmqvist, K., Nyström M., Andersson R., Dewurst R., Jarodzka H., Van de Weijer J. 2015. Eye tracking: A Comprehensive Guide to Methods and Measures. Oxford: Oxford University Press. Jiménez Hurtado, C., Seibel, C., Soler Gallego, S. and Herrero Díaz, S. 2012. Museums for All: Translation and Interpreting for Multimodal Spaces As a Tool for Universal Accessibility. Universitat d’Alacant. Available at: <http://hdl.handle.net/10045/26955>. [Accessed 15 October

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The formal method in Germany and Russia: the beginnings of European psycholinguistics

Abstract

German–Austrian psychology is a direct source of the European formalism movement both in the German context (Germany, Austria) as well as in Russia. This interest of the formalists in the corporeal component of linguistic and literary production has resulted in a particular research stream, which could be defined as a ‘linguo-somatic orientation’. In particular, this is the case of Alois Riegl’s [1] perceptive ‘tactile–optical’ method; Adolf von Hildebrand’s [2] architectonic conception; Konrad Fiedler’s [3] ‘sensorial aesthetics’; W. Wölfflin’s [4] ‘basic concepts’ of the art history, W. Worringer’s [5] psychological arts typology as well as Oskar Walzel’s sound-corporeal poetics elaborated during 1920 [6]. Within Russian formalism, psychological notions (such as ‘representation’, ‘sensation’, ‘apperception’, ‘series’, ‘clear and dark zones of consciousness’, ‘verbal gestures’ and ‘sound gestures’) are fundamental in nearly all the formalist conceptions (Viktor Šklovskij, Evgenij Polivanov, Lev Jakubinskij, Osip Brik, Boris Eixenbaum and Jurij Tynianov). This psychological background constitutes a rather heterogeneous constellation composed of psychological aesthetics and psychological linguistics of the second half of the 19th century. Independently of its intrinsic theoretical values, the formalist way of thinking about language and literature is based on the implicit dominance of psychology, which takes its sense only with respect to the German cognitive tradition, appropriated by the Geisteswissenschaften of this time. In this respect, European formalism participates in the large movement of psychologisation of the humanities. To this extent, the case of Russian formalism is really representative: it invites the rethinking of the genealogy of European structuralism in general. This accumulation of conceptual tools borrowed from the German psychological tradition also reveals a cognitive charge of the formalist theories. The latter constitute a conceptual link between the properly psychological past of the European Geisteswissenschaften and the ‘cognitive’ future of the actual research programmes. Beyond the borrowing of conceptual tools from the psychological trend, the formal method has found in psychology its inspiration for producing new models of analysis. This intrinsically cognitivist dimension of the formalist programme explains its late success during the 1950s–1960s, the period often and abusively called the period of the cognitivist revolution. In reality, it deals with the re-emergence of the research programme of the cognitivist sciences, rather exhaustively formulated by the German psychological tradition..

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Genetic analysis of cabbages and related cultivated plants using the bag-of-words model

Abstract

In this study, we aim to introduce the analytical method bag-of-words, which is mainly used as a tool for the analysis (document classification, authorship attribution and so on; e.g. [1, 2]) of natural languages. Quantitative linguistic methods similar to bag-of-words (e.g. Damerau–Levenshtein distance in the paper by Serva and Petroni [3]) have been used for the mapping of language evolution within the field of glottochronology. We attempt to apply this method in the field of biological taxonomy – on the Brassicaceae (Cruciferae) family. The subjects of our interest are well-known cultivated crops, which at first sight are morphologically very different and culturally perceived as objects of different interests (e.g. oil from oilseed rape, turnip as animal feed and cabbage as a side dish). Despite the phenotypic divergence of these crops, they are very closely related, which is not morphologically obvious at first sight. For this reason, we think that Brassicaceae crops are appropriate illustrative examples for introducing the method. For the analysis, we use genetic markers (internal transcribed spacer [ITS] and maturase K [matK]). Until now, the bag-of-words model has not been used for biological taxonomisation purposes; therefore, the results of the bagof-words analysis are compared with the existing very well-developed Brassica taxonomy. Our goal is to present a method that is suitable for language development reconstruction as well as possibly being usable for biological taxonomy purposes.

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Towards an Encyclopaedia of Sequence Biology

. Translation in Bacillus subtilis: Roles and trends of initiation and termination, insights from a genome analysis. Nucleic Acids Research , 27, 3567–3576. [26] Moll, I., Grill, S., Gualerzi, C.O., et al., 2002. Leaderless mRNAs in bacteria: Surprises in ribosomal recruitment and translational control. Molecular Microbiology , 43 (1), 239–246. [27] Genome database, available at: < https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/genome >. [28] Ambrosini, G., Groux, R., Bucher, P., 2018. PWMScan: A fast tool for scanning entire genomes with a position-specific weight matrix

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Representational Systems in Zoosemiotics and Anthroposemiotics Part I: What Have the So-Called “Talking Animals” Taught Us about Human Language?

.) 1989. Teaching sign language to Chimpanzees. New York: State University of New York Press. pp. 280–92. [101] Savage-Rumbaugh, S.E., Rumbaugh, D.M., Boysen, S., 1978. Symbolic communication between two chimpanzees (Pan Troglodytes). Science , 201, 641–644. [102] Savage-Rumbaugh, S.E., Rumbaugh, D.M., Boysen, S., 1978. Linguistically mediated tool use and exchange by Chimpanzees ( Pan troglodytes ). The Behavioral and Brain Sciences ,1, 539–554. [103] Savage-Rumbaugh, S.E., 1979. Symbolic communication: Its origins and early development in the

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