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The adaptation process and preliminary psychometric evaluation of the Polish version of Kiddo-KINDL questionnaire

://www.kindl.org/fragebogenE.html . [Accessed 16 March 2007]. Ravens-Sieberer U. 2003. Der Kindl-R Fragebogen zur Erfassung der gesundheitsbezogenen Lebensqualität bei Kindern und Jugendlichen – Revidierte Form [The KINDL-R Questionnaire for assessing health-related quality of life in children and adolescents – Revised]. In: J. Schumacher, A. Klaiberg and E. Brähler, editors. Diagnostische Verfahren zu Lebensqualität und Wohlbefinden [Diagnostic tools for Quality of Life and Well-being] Göttingen: Hogrefe Verlag. 184–88. Stevanovic D. 2009. Serbian KINDL questionnaire for quality of life

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Evidence of interpersonal violence or a special funeral rite in the Neolithic multiple burial from Koszyce in southern Poland – a forensic analysis

-16. Smolaga J, Tomaszewski M, Koźmińska A. 1955. Studia krytyczne i doświadczalne nad rozpoznawaniem użytego narzędzia z wyglądu obrażenia. 1. Rozpoznanie narzędzia tępego na podstawie złamań czaszki (Critical and experimental studies on determination of the employed tool based on the appearance of the injury. 1. Determination of a blunt instrument based on skull fractures). Arch Med Psych Sad Krym 6:132-48. Spencer SD. 2012. Detecting Violence in the Archaeological Record: Clarifying the timing of trauma and manner of death in cases of cranial blunt force

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Percentile distribution of blood pressure readings in relation to body mass index: a populationbased cross-sectional study ADOPOLNOR

Textbook of Medical Physiology. The 12 edition. Saunders Elsevier. He Q, Ding ZY, Yee-Tak Fong D, Johan Karlberg J. 2000. Blood pressure is associated with body mass index in both normal and obese children. Hypertension 36:165-170. Jodkowska M, Oblacińska A, Tabak I (2010) Overweight and obesity among adolescents in Poland: gender and regional differences. Public Health Nutr 13(10A):1688-92. Kaczmarek M. 2011. Conceptual frameworks and methodological tools for multidisciplinary approach to the adolescent health research In

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Chemical signals and reconstruction of life strategies from ancient human bones and teeth - problems and perspectives

, Paleogeogr. Paleoclimat. Paleoecol. , 163 , 22-47 Jørkov M. L., J. Heinemeier, N. Lynnerup, 2007, Evaluating bone collagen extraction methods for stable isotope analysis in dietary , J. Archaeol. Sci. , 34 : 1824-29 Katzenberg, M. A., 2000, Stable isotope analysis: A tool for studying past diet, demography, and life history , [in] Biological Anthropology of the Human Skeleton , M. A. Katzenberg, S. R. Saunders (eds.), Wiley-Liss, New York, pp. 305-28 Katzenberg, M. A., A. Weber, 1999

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Frequency and chronological distribution of linear enamel hypoplasia (LEH) in the Late Neolithic and Early Bronze Age population from Żerniki Górne (Poland) – preliminary report

Abstract

Linear enamel hypoplasia (LEH) is treated as a nonspecific indicator of stress, but even so, many authors consider it the most reliable tool stress in anthropological research. Its analysis allows the reconstruction of health related to the socio-economic status of the group. This study documents and interprets patterns of LEH in Żerniki Górne (Poland), a settlement which was functional in the Late Neolithic and the Early Bronze Age. We examined two successive cultures: the Corded Ware Culture (CWC; 3200-2300BC) and the Trzciniec Culture (TC; 1500-1300BC). In total, there were 1486 permanent teeth (124 adult individuals). The frequency of LEH in the examined cultures shows a small rising trend. In these series from Żernik Górne, males showed a higher occurrence of LEH (16.5%) than females (13.4%). The earliest LEH appeared at similar ages at about 2.0/2.2 years and the last LEH occurred at about 4.2 years of age in both cultures. However, it is worth noting that periods associated with physiological stress were more common but not very long (four months on average) in the CWC. Longer stress periods (nine months on average) were associated with the TC.

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Incidence of scoliotic posture in school screening of urban children and adolescents: the case of Poznań, Poland

Abstract

Postural defects including scoliotic posture constitute one of the most frequently observed health problems in school-aged children. The incidence of this multifactorial condition has been observed to increase recently. The aim of the study was to assess the incidence of scoliotic posture in primary and secondary school students living in a large city. The sample consisted of 1,325 boys and 1,355 girls, aged 6 to 18, living in the city of Poznań. Their postures were assessed through skilled visual inspection method based on the criteria delineated by Wiktor Dega. Additionally, measurements of scoliotic deformities were taken using the Bunnell’s scoliometer. It was found that the incidence of scoliosis assessed on the basis of Dega’s postural defect chart amounted in total to 14.6% in boys and 17% in girls. No substantial differences between boys and girls in particular age categories were found. Scoliometer examination appeared to be a more accurate method for screening scoliosis and revealed higher incidence of this condition in total and both in boys and girls as compared to the visual screening method. The contractures which may lead to scoliotic posture appeared most frequently in the knee joints, both in boys and in girls. The incidence of lateral spinal curvatures was related to age and increased with age. Scoliometer proved to be a more effective tool in detecting lateral spinal curvatures and should be more widely used in school healthcare.

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The validity of parental-reported body height and weight: a comparison with objective measurements of 7-8-year-old Czech children

Abstract

The values of body weight and height can be recorded in various ways. Self-reports and parental-report methods are amongst the most typical ways to collect data. These methods have advantages, but also limits. Anthropometric measures are recommended to improve measurement precision. The aim of this study was to investigate whether the parental-reported body weight and height of 7-8-year-old Czech children corresponded with the measured body weight and height. Data concerning children’s body weight and body height were collected via parental informed consent and anthropometric measurements. The research sample consisted of 388 children from 7 to 8 years-old (boys, n = 176; girls, n = 162). Only children with parental informed consent were included. Correlations between parental-reported and measured data were analysed with the Pearson correlation coefficient to examine the strength of linear dependence between the two methods. The differences between parental-reported and measured data were tested using the Wilcoxon signed-rank test. P-values below α = 0.05 were considered statistically significant. Parents manifested a tendency to underestimate body weight and especially the body height of their children. This trend was seen in boys and girls in both age groups. Out of the 338 children with parent-reported height, parents under-reported their child’s height by 1 cm or more in 37.1% of the children, 39.6% of the parents reported a height within 0.99 cm of the measured height, and 23.3% of parents over-reported their child’s height by 1 cm or more. The same number of children had parent-reported weights, parents under-reported their child’s weight by 1 kg and more in 25.2% of the children, 57.7% of the parents reported a weight within 0.99 kg of the measured weight, and 17.1% of the parents over-reported their child’s weight by 1 kg or more. The Pearson correlation coefficient between the measured and parental-reported height and weight revealed a statistically significant strong positive linear relationship in both genders (rheight = 0.912, rweight = 0.943; all p< 0.001). The differences between the measured and parental-reported height and weight were not significantly different (all p< 0.05). The high agreement and correlation between measured and parental-reported body height and weight suggest that parental-report methods can be an appropriate alternative to objective measurement and can be used as a valid tool to classify body height and weight for large population studies of Czech children in school-based research when anthropometric measures are not available.

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Does human sexual dimorphism influence fracture frequency, types and distribution?

Human Bones , Routledge, London and New York McGee R.J., R.L. Warms, 2000, Anthropological Theory: An Introductory History , Mayfield, Mountain View McWhirr A., L. Viner, C. Wells, 1982, Romano-British Cemeteries at Cirencester , Cirencester Excavation Committee, Cirencester Murail P., J. Bruzek, F. Houët, E. Cunha, 2005, DSP: A Tool for Probabilistic Sex Diagnosis Using Worldwide Variation in Hip-Bone Measurements , Bull. Mém. Soc. Anthropol. Paris, 17 , 167

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Predictive equations for height estimation using knee height of older Bengalees of Purba Medinipur, West Bengal, India

region- specific knee height equations. Am J Hum Biol 14:300-7. Lera L, Luis Santos J, Garcia C, Arroyo P, Albala C. 2005. Predictive equations for stature in the elderly: A study in three Latin American cities. Ann Hum Biol 32:773-81. Lohman TG, Roche AF, Martorell R. 1988. Anthropometric Standarization Reference Mannul. Chicago: Human Kinetics Books. Mathew AC, Sampath S, Das D, Vijayakumar M, Ramakrishnan N, Ravishankar SL. 2014. Screening for malnutrition in the elderly population: a tool for estimating height from

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Neck circumference as a screening measure of overweight/obesity among Indian adults

References Adamu LH, Asuku AY, Taura MG, Tela IA, Datti S, Imam A. 2013. Neck circumference: An upcoming tool of adiposity indices. Niger J Basic Clin Sci 10:82-5. Akin I, Nienaber CA. 2015. “Obesity paradox” in coronary artery disease. World J Cardiol 7:603-8. Al-Bachir M, Ahhmad H. 2016. Detecting overweight and obesity among young Syrian boys based on skinfold thickness. Anthropol Rev 79:35-46. Anuradha RK, Sathyavathi RB, Reddy TM, Hemalatha R, Sudhakar G, Geetha P, Reddy KK. 2015. Effect of

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