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Utilisation of a Balanced Scorecard for Museum Management

Abstract

The issues involved with the economic aspects of cultural institutions, their economic impact, and the measurement of their performance has basically only been given systematic attention during the past few years. Traditionally performance assessments are primarily connected with entrepreneurial subjects, which is why this assessment has been applied primarily to financial metrics. During the 1990’s, this issue started to be examined from a new perspective. The question arose as to whether it is realistic to restrict performance measurement only to financial indicators. More and more, the opinion began to spread that for measurement to be truly useful, it must also focus on nonfinancial indicators. Gradually this idea started to be promoted, primarily in the cultural and the artistic non-profit areas and also that it is necessary to pay the requisite attention to this topic. Several studies have been made and there have also been other kinds of attempts to measure their performance; the root of the problem is that in Czech museums there is no longer a single agreed-upon method for measuring performance. This study is focused on the use of the Balanced Scorecard method and on its application in the museum world and also on its use as a tool for managing, monitoring and planning.

Open access
Paperless Archaeology on Castrum Novum

Abstract

Modern technology affects the development of the humanities, including the most traditional of the disciplines such as classical archaeology. We are looking for an answer to the question of whether high-tech could completely replace the basic tools without which we would not even imagine archaeology. Could pencil and paper completely disappear from the trench? We tested the principles regarding paperless archaeology on the exemplary research of the deserted Castrum Novum Roman Colony located in central Italy. The colony was founded in the 3rd century BC and disappeared in the 5th century AD. The discovery of the city occurred in the 18th century when the Pope decided to support the first excavations. Especially unique findings of sculptures became a feature of the Vatican Museums. After that the city was again forgotten. Only in the second half of the 20th century, have we managed to re-locate Castrum Novum. This resulted in the need for modern systematic archaeological research. Currently an extraordinary collaboration is bringing interesting discoveries and new perspectives for the Italian, the French and the Czech archaeologists.

Open access