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She, You and They – More Actors on the Creativity Research Stage!

Abstract

The commentary confirms and builds on Glăveanu’s critical scrutiny of the current stage of creativity research. The need for more actors, theories, methods and definitions will not be fulfilled until critical reflection concerning what has been done and synthesis between different research attempts are achieved. The authors first expand the creativity stage by discussing what will happen in creativity research attempts if we alternate with a “ she, you and they” perspective? They then present a new definition of creativity. Creativity is seen as a collective, generative, novel way of experiencing reality ending with the idea of a shared product that is evaluated as creative in a relevant context. This definition is in line with the development of a new creativity tool or measurement, the Test for Distributed Creativity in Organizational Groups (DOG). The DOG can be used both for measuring the products of creative groups and investigating their processes.

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Will Becoming More Creative Make us More Tolerant?

Abstract

This commentary attempts to address the question of “Why creativity matters?” from the perspective of social psychology, by pointing out processes, which promote creativity while diminishing prejudices. I argue that through enhancing creativity, stereotyping can be reduced which can translate to the further improvement of intergroup relations. The common correlates of low prejudices and creativity supporting this hypothesis, are presented in this paper and comprise: (1) cognitive flexibility, (2) openness to experience and (3) perspective taking. Further, I invoke the existing literature regarding the link between schema-inconsistencies and creativity, which highlights the interrelatedness of these processes, but views creativity as an outcome, rather than a tool for social change. The assumed relationship can be seen as an opening to numerous future research paths, as it can give rise to various detailed questions from the points of view of basic and applied psychology.

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Simulational Realism—Playing as Trying to Remember

Summary

In this text, I describe a specific way of addressing the past in video games which are set in historical times but at the same time deliberately undermine the facticity of their virtual worlds. By grounding my argument in analyses of two blockbuster productions—Assassin’s Creed (Ubisoft, 2007) and Call of Duty: Black Ops (Activision, 2010)—I introduce and define the notion of “simulational realism”. Both games belong to best-selling franchises and share an interesting set of features: they relate to historical places, events, and figures, establish counter-factual narratives based around conspiracy theories, and—most importantly—display many formal similarities. Like most AAA games, Assassin’s Creed and Black Ops intend to immerse the player in the virtual reality and, for this purpose, they naturalize their interfaces as integral elements of reality. However, in the process of naturalizing simulation, objectivity of the past becomes unthinkable.

In my considerations, I situate this problem in two contexts: 1) of a cultural and epistemic shift in perceiving reality which was influenced by dissemination of digital technologies; 2) Vilém Flusser’s prognosis on the effects of computation on human knowledge. According to Flusser’s theory of communication, history—as a specific kind of human knowledge—emerged out of writing that was always linear and referential. Consequently, the crisis of literary culture resulted in the emergence of new aesthetics and forms of representations which—given their digital origin—dictate new ways of understanding reality. As history is now being substituted by timeless post-history, aesthetic conventions of realism are also transformed and replaced by digital equivalents.

Following Flusser’s theory, I assert that we should reflect on the epistemological consequences of presenting the past as simulation, especially if we consider the belief shared by many players that games like Assassin’s Creed can be great tools for learning history. I find such statements problematic, if we consider that the historical discourse, grounded on fact, is completely incompatible with the aesthetics of sim-realism which evokes no illusion of objective reality.

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A Bridge Too Far: Conceptual Distance and Creative Ideation

., & Lees, L. S. (1945). On problem-solving. Psychological Monographs, 58(5), 1-113. Elff, M. (2016). Memisc: Tools for Management of Survey Data and the Presentation of Analysis Results. Retrieved from https://rdrr.io/rforge/memisc/ Fantoni, G., Taviani, C., & Santoro, R. (2007). Design by functional synonyms and antonyms: A structured creative technique based on functional analysis. Proceedings of the Institution of Mechanical Engineers, Part B: Journal of Engineering Manufacture, 221(4), 673-683. Feldhusen, J. F

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Are the Outcomes of Creativity Always Positive?

social information processing theory. Journal of Creative Behavior . http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/jocb.155 Hao, N., Tang, M., Yang, J., Wang, Q., & Runco, M. A. (2016). A new tool to measure malevolent creativity: The malevolent creativity behavior scale. Frontiers in Psychology , 7 , 682. Harris, D. J., & Reiter-Palmon, R. (2015). Fast and furious: The influence of implicit aggression, premeditation, and provoking situations on malevolent creativity. Psychology of Aesthetics, Creativity, and the Arts, 9, 54-64. Harris, D. J., Reiter-Palmon, R

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Child’s creative activity as an opportunity to develop metalearning skills – analysis of an educational programme Creating my own textbook – I know what I want to learn and how

REFERENCES Abykanova, B., Bilyalova, Z., Makhatova, V., Idrissov, S., & Nugumanova, S. (2016). Psychological and pedagogic conditions of activating creative activity in students for successful learning, International Journal Of Environmental & Science Education , 11 (10), 3333-3343. Althuizen, N., & Reichel, A. (2016). The Effects of IT-Enabled Cognitive Stimulation Tools on Creative Problem Solving: A Dual Pathway to Creativity. Journal of Management Information Systems , 33 (1), 11-44. Amabile, T. M. (1983). The social psychology of

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Links Between Creative Performance and Post-Formal Thought

capacities. Creativity Research Journal, 4, 91-122. Mwamwenda, T. (1993). Formal operations and academic achievement. The journal of psychology, 127(1), 99-103. Perry, W. G. (1981). Cognitive and ethical growth: The making of meaning. In A. Chickering (Ed.), The modern American college (pp. 76-116). San Francisco: Jossey-Bass. Piaget, J. (1958). Growth of logical thinking from childhood to adolescence. New York: Basic Books. Pourmohamadi, M., & Gero, J. S. (2011). LINKOgrapher: an analysis tool to study

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The Building and Renovation History of Vilnius and Kaunas Churches: Dendrochronological Dating and Historical Sources

, Alar, and Dieter Eckstein, “Development of a tree-ring chronology of Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L.) for Estonia as a dating tool and climatic proxy.” Baltic Forestry 9 (2) (2003): 76-82. “Lapista löytyi ennätysvanha mänty,” Finnish Forest Research Institute (Metla). 2007.08.06, acessed May 3, 2017, http://www.metla.fi/tiedotteet/2007/2007-08-06-vanhin-puu.htm. Levandauskas, Vytautas, “Rotušė.“ In Kauno architektūra, ed. Algė Jankevičienė. Vilnius: Mokslas, 1991.257-264. Levandauskas, Vytautas, “Šv. Pranciškaus

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Shaping Strömsö: Examining Elements in a Creative Process for the Design of New Television Content

REFERENCES Aaltonen, J. (2018). Käsikirjoittajan työkalut. Audiovisuaalisen käsikirjoituksen tekijän opas. [Tools for the Screen Writer. A guide for the practitioner of audiovisual screen-writing]. Tampere: SKS. Abuhamdeh, S., & Csikszentmihalyi, M. (2004). The artistic personality: A systems perspective. In R. J. Sternberg, E. L. Grigorenko, & J. L. Singer (Eds.), Creativity: From potential to realization (pp. 31-42). Washington, DC: American Psychological Association. doi:10.1037/10692-003 Amabile, T. M., Conti, R., Coon, H., Lazenby, J

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The Dialectics of Industrial Design viz-a-viz The Meta – Design Phenomenon: The on-Going Narrative / Implications for New Design Paradigms and Design Education

. 23. Vassao, C. A. (2010) “Metadesign tools, Strategies and ethics towards complexity” Blutcher Pub. Sao Paulo. Briazil. 24. Wake, W. (2000) “ Design paradigms ”. A source book for creative visualization. Adwark pub. London. 25. Walker, A.J. (1989) “ Design History and History of Design ”, London. Pluto Press. 26. Wood, J. (2007) “ Win-win: synergy tools for metadesigners ”. In Designing for the 21 st Century, Interdisciplinary questions and insights. (Ed.) Thomas Inns. Gower Pub. London.

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