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Nafisa Yeasmin

REFERENCES Almerico, Gina M. 2014. Food and Identity: Food Studies, Cultural, and Personal Identity. – Journal of International Business and Cultural Studies 8. www.aabri.com/manuscripts/141797.pdf (accessed November 30, 2017). Anil, Haluk M. 2014. Religious Slaughter: A Current Controversial Animal Welfare Issue. – Animal Frontiers 2 (3): 64–67. DOI: https://doi.org/10.2527/af.2012-0051 . Atkinson, Ken. 2004. Sustainable Futures for the Arctic North. – Exploring Sustainable Development: Geographical Perspectives , edited by Martin

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Sergiu Novac

Abstract

This article explores how sustainability was staged in the context of EXPO 2000, the first and only world exhibition organized by Germany. The notion seemed to gain ground around the turn of the millennium in global political and policy circles, especially through such documents as the ‘Agenda 21’ and the ‘Millennium Development Goals’. These were also the main source of inspiration while organizing EXPO 2000, which, under the motto ‘Humankind, Nature, Technology’ claimed to put forward a radically different vision for the 21st century. However, throughout the paper I argue that sustainability ended up performing a quite different ideological function. In Germany, the staging of sustainability took place as an activation of expertize, meant to fix a crisis of the economy and to open up new grounds for capitalism’s search for profit, ultimately deepening the environmental crisis that it was meant to alleviate in the first place.

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Jolana Darulová

References BITUŠÍKOVÁ, A. (2015): On the Way to a Sustainable Urban Development: Civic Participation in Selected Slovak Cities. In. Jolana Darulová (ed). Social and Cultural Diversity V. Citizens and Urban Spaces. Banská Bystrica: FF UMB. DARULOVÁ, J. (2015): Transformations of Urban Industrial Sites: Examples of Good Practice and Bad Practice. In. Jolana Darulová (ed): Social and Cultural Diversity V. Citizens and Urban Spaces. Banská Bystrica: FF UMB. HUBA, M., IRA, V., MAČÁKOVÁ,S., ŠVIHLOVÁ, D., ZÁBORSKÁ, Z

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Sam Beck

York: Berghahn Books. Beck, Sam and Carl Maida, (Eds.). (2015a). Public Anthropology in a Borderless World . New York: Berghahn Books. Beck, Sam (2015b). Urban Transitions: Graffiti Transformations. In Public Anthropology in a Borderless World (co-edited with Carl Maida), 314-350. Brooklyn: Berghahn Books. Beck, Sam (2018). Knowledge Production and Emancipatory Social Movements from the Heart of Globalized Hipsterdom, Williamsburg, Brooklyn. In Carl Maida and Sam Beck, (Eds.). Global Sustainability and Communities of Practice , 125-150.Berghahn

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Zbyněk Andrš

Abstract

This article explicates the sociocultural dynamics in the changing lives of the Vlashika Rom group in the Czech and Slovak Republics and contemplates the prospective development of this Roma subculture. To provide a better insight into the endeavour of the Vlashika Rom to maintain their integrity and into their adaptation strategies, the author outlines the genesis of this subethnic group, pointing out the historical circumstances that have formed them in the past. Contrary to former descriptions, the author provides an entirely new concept for dividing the Vlashika Rom into subgroups, identifying three distinct levels that create social boundaries within this community. He describes the way of living of this subgroup in the past as well as the relationships between the Vlashika Rom and the dominant society. Frequently antagonistic, these relationships depend on their way of life, substantially determined by the way they earn their living. The author analyses the inner resources that keep sustaining the contemporary Vlashika Rom culture and, drawing on his own experience and impulses from literature, inquires how long this anachronistic yet at the same time very adaptable culture will be able to resist the assimilation pressures deriving from the very nature of the modern national state.

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Iulia Hurducaş

Abstract

Lefebvre’s 1970 prophecy of the total urbanisation of society has come true with the expansion of the urban into natural and rural territories. For Lefebvre, the question of nature is closed by its ‘steady, violent death’ (Lefebvre, 2003) and its replacement by a ‘second nature’ (Schmid, 2014; Smith, 2008). This closure accounts at an epistemic level, for the dominance of the urban (Krause, 2013; Brenner and Schmid, 2014). Far from being closed, the question of nature is renewed within the present conditions of planetary urbanisation, as the interiorised non-urban is ‘operationalised’ to sustain urban growth, thus making the non-city ‘an essential terrain of capitalist urbanisation’ (Brenner, 2016). In what follows, I present how the Romanian forest is operationalised as a territory of planetary urbanisation through forest management practices. Looking into the negotiations and manipulations on the ground provides a way to ‘pay attention’ (Stengers, 2010) to those practices that sort and select natural areas. In the face of the recorded disappearance of the forest, the effort of making visible the rationality of planning, and the challenges that are posed upon it inscribes itself within an ‘ethics of visibility’ (Roberts, 2012; Topalovic, 2016).

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Claudiu Barbu

Abstract

There are important differences between all Eastern European countries regarding the implementation of pension system privatization. The differences regarding the political configuration between the countries from Eastern Europe might be a possible explanation for the amount of diversity in this area. The ideology of political parties that form or sustain the government that implements the reform can also be an explanation, but this influence must be studied beyond the cliché that stipulates that the right-wing parties will support the public pension system reform and the left-wing parties will oppose it. Armeanu (2010a) showed that there are countries where privatization was supported by the centre-left coalitions that needed to overpass a strong opposition made by the right-wing parties. Using the Ideal Point Estimation technique within the voting sessions related to pension reform during the last three Romanian legislatures, we will explain the formation of pro and against coalitions regarding the pension reform from Romania during the privatization process of public pension system. We also test the hypotheses of the model presented by Armeanu (2010a, 2010b), model that predicts the behaviour of political parties based on the position they have on a two-dimensional space related to the costs of pension reform.

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Tatiana Vagramenko

Open access

Raluca Perneş

REFERENCES Amanor, K. (1999). Global restructuring and land rights in Ghana: Forest food chains, timber, and rural livelihoods . Uppsala: Nordiska Afrikainstitutet. Amanor, K. S. (2008). Sustainable development, corporate accumulation and community expropriation: Land and natural resources in West Africa. In K. S. Amanor, S. Moyo (Eds.), Land and sustainable development in Africa . London: Zed Books. Amin, S. (1973). Neo-Colonialism in West Africa . New York, London: Monthly Review Press. Comaroff, J. L., Comaroff, J. (1992

Open access

Ivan Murín

Bewustseins. Studien uber den Archetypus. Zurich: s.n., Psychologische Abbandlungen, Zv. IX. KLUCKHOHN, C., KROEBER, A. L. and UNTEREINER, W. (1952): Culture: A Critical Review of Concepts and Definition. s.l. : Vintage Books. LIPSITZ, G. (2001): Time Passages: Collective Memory and American Popular Culture. In. American culture, Vol. 4. LOI, A. (1982): Fenomen ponimaniia i kulturno-istoricheskaia ontologiia soznaniia.Comprehension as a Logical-Gnoseological Problem. In. Nauka. London Declaration. (2004): Sustaining Europe