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Towards a Participatory, Co-operative and Sustainable Information Society?

A Critical Analysis of Swedish ICT Policy Discourses

Pieter Verdegem and Christian Fuchs

.) (2011b.) Business as usual. The roots of the global financial crisis . New York: NYU Press. Calhoun, C. and G. Derlugian (eds.) (2011c.) The deepening crisis. Governance challenges after neoliberalism . New York: NYU Press. Eagleton, T. (1991) Ideology: An introduction . London: Verso. European Commission 2010. Europe 2020 - A strategy for smart, sustainable and inclusive growth . Communication from the commission. Retrieved from: http://europa.eu/press_room/pdf/complet_en_barroso___007_-_europe_2020

Open access

The Growing Pains of Community Radio in Africa

Emerging Lessons Towards Sustainability

Peter da Costa

Kenya, Uganda and Tanzania. What happens when / if the donor leaves? Presentation delivered at the 2011 International Communication Association Conference. 28 May 28 2011, Boston. Dorelli, J. (2010) ‘Media of Autonomy: Community Radios of Dakar’ . Downloaded from http://startrek.ccs.yorku.ca/~topia/docs/intersections2010/Dorelli.pdf on 15 August 2011. Fairbairn, .J and Siemering, B. (2007) Guidebook on Sustainability. Developing Radio Partners. Fraser, C. and Estrada, S.R. (2001) The Community Radio Handbook. Paris

Open access

Sustainable Oil and Profitable Wind

The communication of corporate responsibilities as inverted positioning

Jochen Hoffmann and Maria E. Kristensen

References Alvesson, Mats (2014). The Triumph of Emptiness. Consumption, Higher Education and Work Organization. Oxford, UK: Oxford University Press. Aras, Güler & Crowther, David (2009). Corporate Sustainability Reporting: A Study in Disingenuity. Journal of Business Ethics, 87: 279-288, DOI:10.1007/s10551-008-9806-0 Ashcraft, Karen L.; Kuhn, Thomas R. & Cooren, François (2009). Constitutional Amendments: ‘Materializing’ Organizational Communication. Academy of Management Annal, 3: 1-64, DOI:10.1080/19416520903047186 Ashforth, Blake

Open access

Andrew T. Kenyon, Eva-Maria Svensson and Maria Edström

Abstract

Although countries protect and promote freedom of expression in different ways, free speech can be understood to have two basic aspects in democratic constitutional systems: non-censorship and diversity of voices. This article examines how the approach to free speech in Sweden contains both these aspects. Selected comparisons with the US First Amendment, and German broadcasting law, indicate the value in the Swedish approach but also reveal challenges that it faces if free speech’s dual aspects are not clearly recognised – a danger that some contemporary statements suggests is real. Articulating free speech in terms of both non-censorship and diversity may aid Swedish parliamentary processes to uphold important structural aspects of the freedom, but it would also bring into focus larger questions about the limits of parliamentary processes alone in building a viable system of freedom of expression for the future.

Open access

Energy Transition in and by the Local Media

The Public Emergence of an ‘Energy Town’

Anders Horsbøl

Abstract

Climate change mitigation and the transition to environmentally sustainable forms of life have become central public issues, and a number of studies have investigated the role of the media in constructing and distributing representations of climate change and sustainability. Most of these studies have addressed the media at a national or international level. This article investigates the mediating of a local, municipal initiative, i.e. the so-called ‘Energy Town Frederikshavn’ project in northern Denmark, which has set the ambitious goal of complete transition to renewable energy consumption and CO2 neutrality within a few years. Using frame analysis, informed by discourse studies, the article analyzes how the project emerged and was established as a public phenomenon in the media coverage, including how it was made intelligible and which social actors were represented as having a say on the matter. The findings show several differences to national or international representations of climate change and sustainability, such as a prevalent profiling frame and an indication of a reversal of the so-called Giddens’ paradox.

Open access

Stinne Gunder Strøm Krogager, Karen Klitgaard Povlsen and Hans-Peter Degn

Abstract

The present article examines cross-media use among 10- to 16-year-old Danish children and adolescents. Our research interest is in identifying and affirming patterns among media use, gender and age. Using a methodological design that combines qualitative and quantitative methods, we interviewed participants regarding their media use and paired our qualitative findings with quantitative rating inquiries generated from Danish commercial databases. Our results suggest that although cross-media use is complex and differs according to age and gender, media are often used for similar purposes, e.g., sustaining social relationships.

Open access

Helle Sjøvaag

Abstract

Future revenue streams for journalism are said not to lie in breaking news, but in specialist journalism that can engender income to sustain news production. A case study of the Norwegian TV 2 News Channel, however, shows that its profit-making features lie not in its content but in its mode of distribution. The added value of the channel to DTT subscription packages is as much due to TV 2’s market power and news brand value as to the news channel concept itself. This article analyses the function of the news channel in today’s competitive journalistic landscape from the perspective of news sociology and media economy, presenting a quantitative content analysis of the news output of TV 2 News Channel, qualitative interviews with TV 2 news editors, and analysis of key strategy documents of the organization.

Open access

Hunting the Beast on YouTube

The Framing of Nature in Social Media

Cecilia Mörner and Ulrika Olausson

Abstract

Humans’ perceived relationship to nature and non-human lifeforms is fundamental for sustainable development; different framings of nature – as commodity, as threat, as sacred etc. – imply different responses to future challenges. The body of research on nature representations in various symbolic contexts is growing, but the ways in which nature is framed by people in the everyday has received scant attention. This paper aims to contribute to our understanding of the framing of nature by studying how wild-boar hunting is depicted on YouTube. The qualitative frame analysis identified three interrelated frames depicting hunting as battle, as consumption, and as privilege, all of which constitute and are constituted by the underlying notion of human as superior to nature. It is suggested that these hegemonic nature frames suppress more constructive ways of framing the human-nature relationship, but also that the identification of such potential counter-hegemonic frames enables their discursive manifestation.

Open access

Storylab Lessons

A Collaborative Project Between Courses in Journalism and Media Technology

Gunilla Hultén and Malin Picha Edwardsson

Abstract

This article examines Storylab, a collaborative learning project between the journalism programme at Stockholm University and the engineering programme in media technology at the KTH Royal Institute of Technology in Stockholm, designed to combine journalistic storytelling with pervasive media technology. The aim of the study is to identify and reflect on the challenges associated with the approach. The methods used are a survey and semi-structured interviews with the students. The analyses draw on research concerning the current main challenges for the news industry and journalism educators. The results show that Storylab was highly appreciated, and provided students with useful skills for their professional lives. However, not all groups worked well together, and some students wished that the collaboration had been more extensive. Differences in motivations and priorities were mentioned as restraining factors. Therefore, it is argued that for a sustainable media landscape, journalists and engineers must collaborate, and that this cooperation can be brought about during professional training.

Open access

Martina Ladendorf

Abstract

The borders between the media genres journalism and information or PR are blurring, and this development is especially noticeable among freelance journalists. How does this affect freelance journalists, particularly their ethical reasoning? Thirteen interviews with freelancers living in a peripheral northern county in Sweden were analyzed, using a combination of discourse analysis and narrative theory methods and a virtue ethics theoretical framework. It was found that 11 out of 13 informants worked occasionally or regularly with information-type assignments. To sustain the informants’ professional roles and selfidentities of integrity and impartiality, having boundary settings between, first, information/ PR and journalist roles and, second, information and journalist type assignments was crucial. It was evident that individual ethics had replaced professional principles. The freelancers reflexively process media industry constraints, together with their everyday working conditions, in a situation where the ideals and norms of the profession constitute the background for their individual action ethics.