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Marie Pavláková Docekalová, Alena Kocmanová and Jirí Kolenák

.Retrieved September 10, 2014, from http://www.ecgi.org/codes/documents/cadbury.pdf. Cranfield School of Management. (2009). Sustainable Value EABIS Research Project: Corporate Responsibility, Market Valuation and Measuring the Financial and Non-Financial Performance of theFirm.Retrieved June 17, 2014, from http://investorvalue.org/docs/Eabis-ProjectFinal.pdf. Demb, A., Neubauer, F. F. (1992). The Corporate Board: Confronting the Paradoxes. New York: Oxford University Press. Donaldson, L., Davis, J. H. (1991). Stewardship Theory or

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Melita Moretti and Mirko Markič

., Knott, M., & Moustaki, I. (2011). Latent variable models and factor analysis: A unified approach. Chichester: John Wiley & Sons. http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/9781119970583 5. Blandy, R., Dockery, M., Hawke, A., & Webster, E. (2000). Does training pay? Leabrook, South Australia: National Centre for Vocational Education Research. 6. Blewitt, J. (2014). Understanding sustainable development. London: Routledge. 7. Campbell, M. (2006). Counting the value of learning. Training Journal (May), 28-30. 8. Devos, C

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Corina Pelau and Alexandra-Catalina Chinie

. 3. Bointner, R. (2014). Innovation in the energy sector: Lessons learnt from R&D expenditures and patents in selected IEA countries, Energy Policy, 73, 733-747. 4. Boons, F., Montalvo, C., Quist, J., Wagner, M. (2013). Sustainable innovation, business models and economic performance: an overview, Journal of Cleaner Production, 45, 1-8. 5. European Commission (2016): European Innovation Scoreboard 2016, available online at: http://ec.europa.eu/DocsRoom/documents/17823 , accessed on: 19.10.2016 [Dataset]. 6. Eurostat (2016a) Sustainable

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Naše gospodarstvo/Our economy

Journal of contemporary issues in economics and business

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Nicolae Ipate, Katalin Gabriela David, Iudith Ipate and Alexandru Bogdan

Abstract

The future of sustainable development is the bioeconomy with the ―global‖ solution; both global and local action for developed the renewable energy generation. When local solutions are implemented is being laid for global solutions are positive affect the national economy. The implementation of the bioeconomy strategy used by society to prevent urgent problems, such as increasing competition for natural resources, climate change, rural sustainable development. The bioeconomy is a new economic and social order and promotes systemic change from using non-renewable resources to renewables. Bioeconomy reveals that production, which involves the transformation of a limited stock of matter and energy, but respecting the same laws that govern entropy closed systems, the entropy or unavailable matter and energy in the forms tend to increase continuously. Economic growth not only increases the apparent output per unit of inputs, which is performed using finite stock of matter and energy in the world. The current economy is based on fossil fuels and other material inputs suffering entropic degradation, both in the raw material extraction and pollution. The production, even if technical progress leads to lower overall yields. The idea of a steady state as the final economic growth that perpetuated indefinitely pendulum model is an impossibility

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Diana-Maria Tinjala, Lavinia Mirela Pantea and Buglea Alexandru

ethics, The Journal of Business Ethics, 41, 27-43 12. Stevens, B. (2009). Corporate ethical codes as strategic documents: An analysis of success and failure, Electronic Journal of Business Ethics and Organization Studies, 14(2), 14-20 13. Valentine, S. & Barnett, T. (2003). Ethics code awareness, perceived ethical values, and organizational commitment, Journal of Personal Selling & Sales Management, 24(3), 359-367 14. World Business Council for Sustainable Development (2015). Official website, Retrieved May 9, 2015 from

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Nicolae Balteș, Florin Dumiter, Delia David and Ștefania Jimon

Business Administration, GEBA, Procedia Economics and Finance, no. 20, pp. 140 – 146. 4. Directorate General For Internal Policies Policy Department A: Economic And Scientific Policy, (2014), Pension Schemes, European Parliament. 5. Eatock, D., (2015), European Union pension systems Adequate and sustainable?, European Parliamentary Research Service. 6. European Actuarial Consultative Group, (2012), Sustainability of pension systems in Europe – the demographic challenge. 7. Fenge, R., Scheubel, B., (2017), Pensions and fertility: back to the roots

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Mariana Bălan

Abstract

Even if the issue of youths’ inclusion in the labour market was always an important item on political agendas, during the last two decades this issue had particular relevance. In the last years, unemployment for this age group had unprecedented amplitude, reaching 20.6% in Romania in 2016. Modern societies provide for youths opportunities, still they are faced with major challenges related to the education and training and access to the labour force market.

During the last decades, the world economy shifted in a continuous process from development based on traditional factors to the knowledge-based economy. The development of the knowledge-based economy leads to changes in labour force demand also: new skills and competences are required. As new technologies are implemented, the demand for high-skilled workers increases, especially for high-skilled ones in the field of Information and Communication (IC), and the demand for low-skilled workers decreases.

The paper presents a brief characterisation of the labour force market at the level of Romania‘s regions of development and an analysis of the particularities of the youths’ labour market in the context of sustainable development and of the new economy as well as some advantages of using young labour force for sustainable development.

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Ioan-Mădălin Neagu

References 1. Ahvenniemi, H., Huovila, A., Pinto-Seppä, I., Airaksinen, M., (2017), What are the differences between sustainable and smart cities? Cities 60 (A), pp. 234-245. 2. Bonomi, F., (2011), Connected vehicles, the internet of things, and fog computing. In: Proceedings of the Eighth ACM International Workshop on Vehicular Inter-Networking (VANET), pp. 13-15. 3. Caragliu, A., Del Bo, C. and Nijkamp, P., (2011), Smart Cities in Europe, Journal of Urban Technology, 18, pp. 65-82. 4. Caragliu

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Nora Rodek Berkes

. Berkes, N., Birkner, Z., & Ernszt, I. (2015). Sustainable and responsible operation in tourism . In: Útkeresés – Tudomány – Felelősség (eds) Svéhlik Csaba, Kheops Autómobil Kutató Intézet, Mór, 2015. Birkner, Z., & Máhr, T. (2016). Interpreting innovation – in another way. Budapest Management Review, 47 (10), 39-50. Blowfield, M., & Murray, A. (2008). Corporate responsibility- a critical introduction . Oxford: Oxford University Press. Boutilier, R. (2009). Stakeholder politics: Social capital, sustainable development and the corporation . Stanford