Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 62 items for :

  • structural steel x
  • Life Sciences, other x
Clear All
Open access

Jakub Kowalski and Janusz Kozak

Abstract

In the shipbuilding industry, the risk of brittle fracture of the structure is limited by using certified materials with specified impact strength, determined by the Charpy method (for a given design temperature) and by supervising the welding processes (technology qualification, production supervision, non-destructive testing). For off-shore constructions, classical shipbuilding requirements may not be sufficient. Therefore, the regulations used in the construction of offshore structures require CTOD tests for steel and welded joints with a thickness greater than 40 mm in the case of high strength steel and more than 50 mm in the case of other steels. Classification societies do not accept CTOD test results of samples with a thickness less than the material tested. For this reason, the problem of theoretical modeling of steel structure destruction process is a key issue, because laboratory tests for elements with high thickness (in the order of 100 mm and more) with a notch are expensive (large samples, difficulties in notching), and often create implementation difficulties due to required high load and range of recorded parameters. The publication will show results and conclusions from numerical modeling of elastic properties for steel typical for offshore applications.

Calculations were carried out at the Academic Computer Centre in Gdańsk.

Open access

Jakub Kowalski and Janusz Kozak

PWN, 1998. 12. British Standard, BS 7910:2005 Guide to methods for assessing the acceptability of flaws in metallic structures, Londyn: BSI, 2005. 13. NORSOK STANDARD, M-101, Structural steel fabrication, Lysaker: Standards Norway, 2011. 14. Polish Committee for Standardisation, PN-EN ISO 15653:2010 Metallic materials – Test method to determine quasi-static brittle fracture toughness of welds (in Polish), Warsaw: Polish Committee for Standardisation, 2010. 15. Dassault Systèmes, Abaqus 6.14 Documentation, Providence, RI: Dassault Systèmes

Open access

Jerzy Łabanowski, Aleksandra Świerczyńska and Santina Topolska

References 1. Astrom H., Nicholson F., Stridh L.E., Welding of stainless steels in the building of chemical tankers. Welding in the World, Vol. 36, (1995), pp.181-189. 2. Charles J., The duplex stainless steels: materials to meet your needs. Proc. Conf. “Duplex Stainless Steels ‘91”, Les Ulis, France, Les Editions de Physique (1991), pp. 3-45. 3. Wang X.G., Dumortier D., Riquier Y., Structural evolution of zeron 100 duplex stainless steel between 550 and 1100°C. Proc. Conf. “Duplex Stainless Steels '91”, Les Ulis, France, Les Editions de Physique, (1991

Open access

Henryk Buglacki and Piotr Eichert

. Piero Caridis: Inspection, repair and maintenance of ship structures. Witherby Publishers, London 2001. IACS Unified Requirements W11: Normal and higher strength hull structural steels. Rev. 2004. Guidelines for the inspection and maintenance of double hull tanker structures. TSCF 1995. TÜV Austria: Corrosion testing of ships. CORRSHIP Project of 5 th FPEU, 2003-2006. Vallen Systeme GmbH: AMSY5 Specification. The Acoustic Emission Company. Icking, Germany

Open access

Marek Jakubowski

References Jakubowski M.: Influence of pitting corrosion on fatigue and corrosion fatigue of ship structures. Part I: Mechanism and modeling of pitting corrosion of ship structures. To be published in Polish Maritime Research Jakubowski M.: Influence of pitting corrosion on fatigue and corrosion fatigue of ship structures. Part II: Loading - pitting - cracking interaction. To be published in Polish Maritime Research Melchers R. E.: Pitting corrosion of mild steel in marine

Open access

Roman Wan-Wendner

prediction models for time-dependent processes are paramount for the construction of new and the maintenance of existing structures within the frameworks of life cycle cost analyses and sustainability. In order to accurately identify, assess and predict a structural system’s performance and full safety potential, all influences that a real structure is likely to face have to be captured accurately. For concrete, these are (mildly reinforced as well as prestressed, depending on the type of structure), among others, aging, cracking, shrinkage, creep, steel relaxation

Open access

Lea Ranacher, Kathrin Höfferer, Miriam Lettner, Franziska Hesser, Tobias Stern, Romana Rauter and Peter Schwarzbauer

-story timber construction Generally speaking, WMC accounts for the most positive perception among the participants. All the participants associate timber constructions with high-quality wood features. Reasons to favor timber over concrete or steel constructions were the positive aspects attached to wood such as health effects as well as societal benefits regarding climate change mitigation. For WMC, 11 different topics were discussed, which in total received 148 hits making it the most discussed innovation. The participants mainly discussed about safety, costs, and

Open access

Karol Niklas

. VON DER HAAR, C and MARX, S. Design aspects of concrete towers for wind turbines. J. S. Afr. Inst. Civ. Eng. 2015, vol.57, n.4, pp. 30-37. ISSN 2309-8775. http://dx.doi.org/10.17159/2309-8775/2015/v57n4a4. 49. DNV-OS-B101, OFFSHORE STANDARD, METALLIC MATERIALS, Det Norske Veritas 2009 50. EN 10025-2 - Non-alloy structural steels, European Committee for Standardization, 2005

Open access

Taru Sandén, Georg J. Lair, Jeroen P. van Leeuwen, Guðrún Gísladóttir, Jaap Bloem, Kristín Vala Ragnarsdóttir, Markus Steffens and Winfried E.H. Blum

obtain macroaggregates (250-5000 µm) and two microaggregate fractions (20-250 µm and < 20 µm). All aggregate fractions were washed in a steel pressure filter apparatus (mesh size 0.45 µm) with deionized water until the electronic conductivity dropped below 5 µS cm -1 , then oven dried at 105°C, weighed, and ground for further analyses (C and N t analyses as described above in section 2.3). The masses of aggregates were corrected for their respective silt and sand content (for aggregates 20-250 µm, and >250 µm), in order to exclude single silt and sand particles from

Open access

D.A. McConnell, D.G. Doody, C.T. Elliott, D.I. Matthews and C.P. Ferris

stainless steel V-shaped collection tray (0.5 × 0.1 × 0.1 m) placed in the trench to act as a runoff collector. The upslope edge of each tray was fitted with a 0.07 m horizontal lip, and this was driven horizontally (to a distance of approximately 0.05 m) into the soil directly underneath each plot, at a depth of approximately 0.03 m below the soil surface. A 0.02 m diameter outlet at the base of the each collection tray allowed runoff collected from each plot to drain into a two-litre high density polyethylene (HDPE) collection container via a 0.5 m length of underground