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Hepatocyte steatosis increases the expression of adhesion molecules in endothelial cells

: potential implications for inflammation and plaque instability. Circulation. 2000; 101: 1372-8. 13. Mazzone GL, Rigato I, Ostrow JD, Bossi F, Bortoluzzi A, Sukowati CH, et al. Bilirubin inhibits the TNFalpharelated induction of three endothelial adhesion molecules. Biochem Biophys Res Commun. 2009; 386: 338-44. 14. Jin X, Yang YD, Chen K, Lv ZY, Zheng L, Liu YP, et al. HDMCP uncouples yeast mitochondrial respiration and alleviates steatosis in L02 and hepG2 cells by decreasing ATP and H2O2 levels: a novel mechanism for NAFLD. J Hepatol

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Distribution of hepatitis C virus genotypes, hepatic steatosis and their correlation with clinical and virological factors in Pakistan

. Hepatology. 1992; 16:293-9. 6. Kanai K, Kako M, Okamoto H. HCV genotypes in chronic hepatitis C virus and response to interferon. Lancet. 1992; 339:1543. 7. Shah H.A, Jafri W, Malik I, Prescott L, Simmonds P. Hepatitis C virus (HCV) genotypes and chronic liver disease in Pakistan. J Gastroenterol Hepatol. 1997; 12: 758-61. 8. Szanto P, Grigorescu M, Dumitru I, Serban A. Steatosis in hepatitis C virus infection. Response to anti-viral therapy. J Gastrointestin Liver Dis. 2006; 15:117-24 9. Marzouk D, Sass J

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Adipokines, insulin resistance, hepatic steatosis, and necroinflammation in patients with chronic viral hepatitis

Ther. 2005; 22(Suppl 2):24-7. 4. Lonardo A, Adinolfi LE, Loria P, Carulli N, Ruggiero G, Day CP. Steatosis and hepatitis C virus: mechanisms and significance for hepatic and extrahepatic disease. Gastroenterology. 2004; 126:586-97. 5. Clouston AD, Jonsson JR, Powell EE. Steatosis as a cofactor in other liver diseases: hepatitis C virus, alcohol, hemochromatosis, and others. Clin Liver Dis. 2007; 11:173-89. 6. Yokoyama H, Hirose H, Ohgo H, Saito I. Inverse association between serum adiponectin level and transaminase

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Physical activity as a protective factor against development of liver steatosis in patients infected with hepatitis C

References 1. Adinolfi L.E., Gambardella M., Andreana A., Tripo­di M.F., Utili R., Ruggiero G. (2001) Steatosis acceler­ates the progression of liver damage of chronic hepati­tis C patients and correlates with specific HCV genotype and visceral obesity. Hepatol. , 33(6): 1358-1364. DOI: 10.1053/jhep.2001.24432. 2. Blair S.N., Kampert J.B., Kohl H.W., Barlow C.E., Macera C.A., Paffenbarger R.S., Gibbons L.W. (1996) Influences of cardiorespiratory fitness and other precur­sors on cardiovascular disease and all-cause mortality in

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Pharmacokinetics of Doxycycline in Ducks with Steatosis due to Force-feeding

-Maximilians-Universitet, München, Germany, 9. Bernard, P.G., Bengone, T, Prehn, D., Durand, S., Labie, C., Benard, P. (2006). Physiology of ducks during force-feeding: study of hepatic steatosis. Bulletin de l‘Academie Vétérinaire de France 159, 43–54. 10. Bogin, E., Avidar, Y., Merom, M., Israeli, B., Malkinson, M., Sobak, S., Kudler, Y. (1984). Biochemical changes associated whit fatty liver in geese. Avian Pathol. 13, 683-901. http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/03079458408418566 PMid:18766879 11. Awde, S., Marty-Gasset, N., Wilkesman, J., Remingnon, H. (2013). Proteolytic activity

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Histopathological Changes in Rat Liver After A Single High Dose of Aluminium

Histopathological Changes in Rat Liver After A Single High Dose of Aluminium

Aluminium (Al) exposure may affect the liver of experimental animals. This investigation aimed at evaluating morphological changes in rat liver after a single high dose of Al (as metallic powder suspension). A total of forty female Wistar rats were divided in one exposed and one control group, 20 rats each. The exposed rats received 0.5 mL of sterile physiological suspension of fine Al powder in the concentration of 100 mg mL-1 intraperitoneally (50 mg Al per rat). After 7 weeks all animals were killed (by exsanguination from the abdominal aorta in ether anaesthesia). Liver aluminium was analysed using electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry. For light microscopy the liver tissue was stained with hematoxylin and eosin, and for histochemical analysis with aurin threecarbocsillic acid (aluminon).

Liver Al level was markedly higher in the exposed (37.1 μg g-1) than in control rats (0.71 μg g-1). The exposed rats showed crystalloid Al inclusions in the capsular, subcapsular, and portal liver tissue. The basic liver structure remained intact. Slightly multiplied bile ductuli were found in 16 of 20 exposed and in 8 of 20 control rats. Three exposed rats had mycrovesicular steatosis. The peritoneum and Glisson's capsule showed strong macrophage infiltration and a foreign-body-like reaction with multiple giant macrophages containing Al crystalloid inclusions. Although this reaction was a defense against the metal, some Al passed this barrier and entered the liver tissue, exerting toxic effects in bile ductuli and hepatocytes.

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Cytoprotective Effects of Taurine Against Toxicity Induced by Isoniazid and Hydrazine in Isolated Rat Hepatocytes

:82-87. 31. Zhang F, Lau SS, Monks TJ. The cytoprotective effect of N-acetyl-L-cysteine against ROS-induced cytotoxicity is independent of its ability to enhance glutathione synthesis . Toxicol Sci 2011;120:87-97. doi: 10.1093/toxsci/kfq364 32. Redmond HP, Wang JH, Bouchier-Hayes D. Taurine attenuates nitric oxide- and reactive oxygen intermediatedependent hepatocyte injury . Arch Surg 1996;131:1280-7. 33. Kerai MD, Waterfield CJ, Kenyon SH, Asker DS, Timbrell JA. Taurien: protective properties against ethanol-induced hepatic steatosis and

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Effects of simvastatin and fenofibrate on butyrylcholinesterase activity in the brain, plasma, and liver of normolipidemic and hyperlipidemic rats

.metabol.2013.12.009 38. Kallai-Sanfacon MA, Cayen MN, Dubuc J, Greselin E, Dvornik D. Effect of AY-25,712 and other lipid-lowering agents on liver catalase and liver carnitine acetyltransferase in rats. Proc Soc Exp Biol Med 1983;173:367-71. doi: 10.3181/00379727-173-41658 39. Harano Y, Yasui K, Toyama T, Nakajima T, Mitsuyoshi H, Mimani M, Hirasawa T, Itoh Y, Okanoue T. Fenofibrate, a peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha agonist, reduces hepatic steatosis and lipid peroxidation in fatty liver Shionogi mice with hereditary fatty liver. Liver Int 2006

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Myotonic dystrophy-2: Unusual phenotype due to a small CCTG-expansion

no yes yes dilative cardiomyopathy no yes yes noncompaction no yes yes elevated GGT no yes yes Gastrointestinal: dysphagia no yes yes dysmotility no yes yes steatosis no yes no liver cirrhosis no no yes gallstones yes yes no Bones: hyperostosis no yes no foot deformities no yes no small sella no yes no large air sinuses no yes no Skin: frontal balding no yes yes pilomarticoma no yes no

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Serum microRNA-34a is potential biomarker for inflammation in nonalcoholic fatty liver disease

Currently, nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) has become a worldwide health concern because its prevalence is rising and it is an emerging etiology of chronic liver diseases [ 1 - 3 ]. Moreover. NAFLD is closely associated with obesity metabolic syndrome, and cardiovascular diseases [ 4 ]. NAFLD can be divided into two groups: simple steatosis and nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) [ 5 ]. In particular, NASH increases the risk of death compared with the general population, and can progress to cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma [ 5 , 6 ]. Importantly

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