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Seyede Zahra Banihosseini, Marefat Ghaffari Novin, Hamid Nazarian, Abbas Piryaei, Siavash Parvardeh and Fatemeh Eini

: 206. Boots A.W., Haenen G.R.M.M., Bast A. (2008). Health effects of quercetin: From antioxidant to nutraceutical. Eur. J. Pharmacol., 585: 325-337. Camargo C.A.,da Silva M.E.F.,da Silva R.A., Justo G.Z., Gomes- Marcondes M.C., Aoyama H. (2011). Inhibition of tumor growth by quercetin with increase of survival and prevention of cachexia in Walker 256 tumor-bearing rats. Biochem. Biophys. Res. Commun., 406: 638-642. Cho J.Y., Kim I.S., Jang Y.H., Kim A.R., Lee S.R., (2006). Protective effect of quercetin, a natural

Open access

Alina Kałużewicz, Monika Gąsecka and Tomasz Spiżewski

distribution and frost hardiness of vegetating winter wheat plants. Russ. J. Plant Physiol. 55: 308-314. Koh E., Wimalasiri K.M.S., Chassy A.W., Mitchell A.E., 2009. Content of ascorbic acid, quercetin, kaempferol and total phenolics in commercial broccoli. J. Food Compos. Anal. 22: 637-643. Kowalczyk K., Zielony T., Gajewski M., 2008. Effect of Aminoplant and Asahi on yield and quality of lettuce grown on rockwool. In: Biostimulators in Modern Agriculture. Vegetable Crops. Z.T. Dąbrowski (Ed.), Wieś Jutra, Warszawa: 35

Open access

Katarzyna Ognik, Ewelina Cholewińska and Anna Czech

lucerne protein concentrate. J. Anim. Feed Sci., 23: 236-243. Hager- Theodorides A.L., Goliomytis M., Delis S., Dligeorgis S. (2014). Effects of dietary supplementation with quercetin on broiler immunological characteristics. Anim. Feed Sci. Tech., 198: 224-230. Jaccob A.A., Hussain S.A. (2012). Effects of long-term use of flavonoids on the absorption and tissue distribution of orally administered doses of trace elements in rats. Pharmacology & Pharmacy, 3: 474-480. Jankowski J., Juśkiewicz J., Zduńczyk P., Kosmala M

Open access

Ewa Waś, Teresa Szczęsna, Helena Rybak-Chmielewska, Dariusz Teper and Katarzyna Jaśkiewicz

Abstract

A method was elaborated to determine phenolic compounds (vanillin, caffeic, p-coumaric and salicylic acids, and flavonoids: rutin, hesperetin, quercetin, pinocembrin, apigenin, kaempferol, isorhamnetin, chrysin, and acacetin) in bee pollen loads using highperformance liquid chromatography with a diode array detector (HPLC-DAD). Phenolic compounds from bee pollen were isolated on Cleanert C18-SPE columns (500 mg/6 mL, Agela Technologies). Polyphenols were identified by comparing the retention times and spectra of compounds found in pollen load samples with the ones of the standard mixture. Quantitative analysis was conducted using the external standard method. In addition, basic validation parameters for the method were determined. For the identified compounds (except for the salicylic acid), satisfactory (≥0.997) linear correlations were obtained. The elaborated method showed high repeatability and inter-laboratory reproducibility. Variability coeffcients of the majority of phenolic compounds did not exceed 10% in conditions of repeatability and inter-laboratory reproducibility, and for the total polyphenolic content they were 1.7 and 5.1%, respectively. The pollen load samples (n = 15) differed in qualitative and quantitative composition of the phenolic compounds. In all the samples, we identified the p-coumaric and salicylic acids and flavonoids rutin, hesperetin, and apigenin nevertheless, these compounds’ contents significantly differed among individual samples. The total phenolic content in the tested samples of pollen loads ranged from 0.653 to 5.966 mg/100 g (on average 2.737 mg/100 g).

Open access

Mehmet M. Özcan, Fahad Aljuhaimi, Elfadıl E. Babiker, Nurhan Uslu, Durmuş Ali Ceylan, Kashif Ghafoor, Mustafa Mete Özcan, Nesim Dursun, Isam Mohamed Ahmed, Fadimu Gbemisola Jamiu and Omer N. Alsawmahi

Abstract

The objective of the present work was to investigate the influence of locations on bioactive propertiest, phenolic compounds and mineral contents of bee pollens. The oil content of pollen grains changed between 3.50% (Alanya) and 6.85% (Russia-Perm Region). The highest total phenolic content (720 mg/100g) and antioxidant activity values (81.4%) were observed in pollens obtained from the Russia-Perm Region and Alanya districts, respectively. Additionally, the highest carotenoid was found in a pollen sample collected from Karaman (Sarıveliler) (98.6 mg/g). The major phenolic compounds were (+)-catechin (66.75-337.39 mg/100g) and quercetin (61.2-1221.7 mg/100g) in all pollen samples. The pollen samples were observed to be a significant source of potassium (3846-6287 mg/kg), phosphorus (2947-5010 mg/kg), calcium (1022-2424 mg/kg) and sulfur (1744-2397 mg/kg). All of the analysis results were significantly affected by supplying locations. The antioxidant activity values of pollens were found partly similar and varied depending on locations. The content of saturated fatty acid (palmitic) was high (20-30%) in the tested pollen samples but did not exceed the content of linoleic acid.

Open access

María C. Ciappini and Fernando S. Stoppani

Abstract

Polyphenolic compounds reportedly produce physiological effects that are beneficial to health. Bee products are particularly rich in polyphenolic compounds. We determined the antioxidant capacity and the phenolic and flavonoid compounds content of 81 samples of honey. We used the Folin-Ciocalteu reagent method to evaluate the total phenolic content. The antioxidant activities were evaluated using in vitro scavenging assays of 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH ) and hydroxyl radicals (OH ), Trolox equivalent antioxidant capacity (TEAC ), and ferric-reducing antioxidant capacity (FRAC ). Total phenolic content ranged from 40.3 to 193.0 mg gallic acid equivalents (GAE )/100 g; the flavonoid content varied from 1.4 to 7.5 mg quercetin equivalents (QE)/100 g. Eucalyptus honeys exhibited significantly higher phenolic content and free radical-scavenging activity than clover honey samples (p<0.05 for all). Principal component analysis explained 73% of the differences observed in antiradical activity with respect to floral origin. Total phenolic content may be more useful than the radical-scavenging assay for detecting antioxidant capacity in honey; it also represents the variable that most appropriately discriminated among these honeys.

Open access

Kamila Dmochowska, Karol Giejdasz, Monika Fliszkiewicz and Krystyna Żółtowska

spruce budworm, Christoneura fumiferana. J. Insect. Physiol. , 47: 1-10. Francis F., Haubruge E., Dierickx P. (2002) - Glutathione S-transferase izoenzymes in the two-spot ladybird, Adalia bipunctata (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae). Arch. Insect Biochem. Physiol. , 49: 158-166. Fröhlich D. R., Burris T. E., Brindley W.A. (1989) - Characterization of glutathion-S-transferase in a solitary bee, Megachile rotunda (Fab.) (Hymenoptera: Megachilidea) and inhibition by chalcones, flavones, quercetin and triphanediol. Comp

Open access

Veronika Borutinskaitė, Gražina Treigytė, Dalius Matuzevičius, Ilona Zaikova, Violeta Čeksterytė, Dalius Navakauskas, Bogumila Kurtinaitienė and Rūta Navakauskienė

. Molecules, 17(4), 4400-4423. DOI: 10.3390/molecules17044400 Erlund, I. (2004). Review of the flavonoids quercetin, hesperetin, and naringenin. Dietary sources, bioactivities, bioavailability, and epidemiology. Nutrition Research, 24(10), 851-874. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.nutres.2004.07.005 Ferreira, I., Aires, E., Barreira, J.C.M., Estevinho, L.M. (2009). Antioxidant activity of Portuguese honey samples: different contributions of the entire honey and phenolic extract. Food Chemistry, 114(4), 1438-1443. DOI: 10.1016/j.foodchem.2008

Open access

Wanda Bacieczko and Agnieszka Borcz

syriaca L. - an underexploited industrial crop for energy and chemical feedstock. Romanian Biotechnological Letters Supplement 16(6): 131-132. Sikorska M. & Matławska I. 2000. Quercetin and its glycosides in the flowers of Asclepias syriaca L. Acta Poloniae Pharmaceutica 57(4): 321-324. Sikorska M., Matławska I., Głowniak K. & Zgórka G. 2000. Qualitative and quantitative analysis of phenolic acidsin Asclepias syriaca L. Acta Poloniae Pharmaceutica 57(1): 69-72. Sikorska M., Matławska I. & Frański R. 2001. Kaempferol and

Open access

Daiana Garcia, Andrea Nesci, Natalia S. Girardi, M. Alejandra Passone and Miriam Etcheverry

in the laboratory. Medical and Veterinary Entomology, 17 (2): 211–220. D aborn P.J., L umb C., B oey A., W ong W., F french -C onstant R.H., B atterham P. 2007. Evaluating the insecticide resistance potential of eight Drosophila melanogaster cytochrome P450 genes by transgenic over-expression. Insect Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, 37 (5): 512–519. D iaz N apal G.N., P alacios S.M. 2015. Bioinsecticidal effect of the flavonoids pinocembrin and quercetin against Spodoptera frugiperda . Journal of Pest Science, 88 (3): 629