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Sorin Gog

CITED DOCUMENTS AND LEGISLATION Consiliul Național pentru Finanțarea Învățământului Superior [The National Council for the Financing of Higher Education] – CNFIS (2008). Analiza evoluției indicatorului de calitate IC6 privind “nivelul performanțelor în cercetarea științifică din universități” și influența acestuia în repartizarea alocațiilor bugetare destinate finanțării de bază [The analysis of the evolution of the quality indicator IC6 of the “level of performances in scientific research of the universities” and its influence on the distribution of

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Ethnologia Actualis

The Journal of Ethnographical Research

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Mircea Comşa

Studies , 29: 444-459. Stockemer, D., LaMontagne, B., Scruggs, L. (2013). Bribes and ballots: The impact of corruption on voter turnout in democracies. International Political Science Review, 34: 74-90. Sundström, A., Stockemer, D. (2013). Quality of government affect voter turnout in the European regions. QoG Working Paper Series . Swaddle, K., Heath, A. (1989). Official and Reported Turnout in the British General Election of 1987. British Journal of Political Science , 19: 537-570. Teixeira, R.A. (1992). The Disappearing American Voter

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Nicolette Makovicky

Bibliography AKERLOF, G. A. (1970): The Market for “Lemons”: Quality Uncertainty and the Market Mechanism. In: The Quarterly Journal of Economics , vol. 84(3), pp. 488-500. APPADURAI, A. (1987): T he Social Life of Things: Commodities in Cultural Perspective. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. BLEED, P. (2000): Purveying the past: Structure and strategy in the American antiques trade. In: Plains Anthropologist, vol. 45, pp. 179-188. BISHOP, R. (1999): What Price History? Functions of narrative in Television Collectibles Shows. In

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Cristine Palaga

Abstract

The current frailties of the Romanian health care system are often explained by resorting to the previous regime’s institutional framework, rarely accepting that they are also the product of post-1990 reforms and the neoliberal means of system reconfiguration. This paper provides an ethnographic account of the ways in which two “products” of these reforms actively contribute to the augmentation of private medical services and to the diminishing access to quality care in the public system: the bureaucratization of primary medicine and the “dual medical practice”. More specifically, I use the concept of “informal exchanges” in order to explore the variety of transactions that occur between patients and the health care staff and to document the means through which its main social actors understand, reproduce, legitimize or blame the very existence of these practices. Then, I analyze how referrals to private medical units increasingly replace informal payments, simultaneously laying even harder obstacles in the access to health care for those in need.

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Bianca Balea

Abstract

The present paper challenges the dominance of the digital natives’ agenda and turns its attention to the social context in which Internet usage among adolescents occurs. Findings indicate that even when young people are using the Internet with the same frequency, i.e. every day, the differences among them remain significant. Therefore, it can be argued that considering an entire cohort to be similar in terms of Internet use only due its age is a misconception. The way children make use of the Internet and the gratifications they gain after using it depend, as van Dijk (2005) showed, on the quality of access, on the level of skills, and on the personal (e.g. Experience, self-efficacy, confidence) and positional resources (e.g. Age, gender, socio-economic status). Questioning the main determinants that lead to the most advanced way to make use of the Internet, the logistic analysis shows that, in order for a Romanian adolescent to turn into an experienced user once he or she embedded the Internet in his or her everyday life, is a matter of skills, experience, and time online, and is less a matter of socioeconomic background. However, we have to keep in mind the previous path analysis’ findings, which emphasize that online experience, time spent online, self-efficacy, and digital skills are all determined, through direct or indirect effects, by demographic variables (i.e. age, gender and socio-economic status), even when age is held constant (Fizesan [Balea], 2012).