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Prasad A. Naik and Kay Peters

References Naik, Prasad (2007): “Integrated Marketing Communications: Provenance, Practice and Principles,” in: Ambler, T./Tellis, G.: Handbook of Advertising, Sage Publications, pp. 35 - 53. Naik, Prasad; Peters, Kay (2009): “A Hierarchical Marketing Communications Model of Online and Offline Media Synergies,” Journal of Interactive Marketing, Vol. 23 (4), pp. 288 - 299. Naik, Prasad; Raman, Kalyan (2003): “Understanding the Impact of Synergy in Multimedia Communications,” Journal of Marketing Research, Vol. 40

Open access

Martin Mačanga and Martin Plešivčák

.4.871 Marčan, P., 2010: Trh s elektrinou rozhýbala konkurencia (Electricity market has been bestirred by competition - in Slovak), Bratislava: Inštitút pre energetickú bezpečnosť. Nies, S., 2008: Ownership Unbundling in Energy Markets - An overview of a heated debate in Europe, Institut Français des Relations Internationales, Paris, available at: http://www.ifri.org/?page=detailcontribution&id=233&id_provenance=97, DoA: 12.11.2013. Oberndorfer, U., 2011: Energy prices, volatility, and the stock market: Evidence from the Eurozone. In: Energy

Open access

Greg Lloyd

Abstract

Shared services are now established as a core delivery model in local and regional governance arrangements. Shared services have emerged as a ‘common sense’ delivery vehicle with attendant efficiency and effectiveness gains. There is, however, a more complex intellectual provenance to a reliance on shared services. In essence, shared services are the logical outcome of the deliberate turn to neo-liberal thinking and the various iterations of the new public managerialism methodology which has progressively established itself in local and regional governance over the past thirty years or so. This paper explores the neo-liberal provenance of shared services and considers the consequential vulnerabilities to austerity, administrative reform and reduced public sector budgets. The central proposition of the paper is that while neo-liberal ideas have created the justification for shared services, this has embedded a set of systemic tensions in the delivery model.