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A Collection of African Red Slip Ware in the Náprstek Museum

Abstract

A group of six specimens of Late Roman pottery from the region of North Africa forms part of collections of the Náprstek Museum. The group comprises of vessels from several different functional types, forming a representative sample of the pottery production of the region. The paper discusses the setting of the individual vessels in the North African ceramic production, their dating, and provenance.

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Shabti of King’s Mother Tasheretenese

References GLR IV GAUTHIER, Henri. Le livre des rois d’Egypte IV. Recueil de titres et protocoles royaux, noms propres de rois, reines, princes et princesses, et parents de rois, suivi d’un index alphabetique; De la XXVe dynastie a la fin des Ptolemees, Le Caire 1915 PM VIII MÁLEK, Jaromír. Topographical Bibliography of Ancient Egyptian Hieroglyphic Texts, Statues, Reliefs and Paintings VIII. Objects of Provenance Not Known. Part 2. Private Statues (Dynasty XVIII to the Roman Period). Statues of Divinities, Oxford 1999

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“Father and Mother”: Tantric Couples in the Collection of the Náprstek Museum and the History of the Collection Description

Buddhism. The Tibet Journal, 22 (1), 1997, p. 12-34. HUNTINGTON, John C. - BANGDEL, Dina. The Circle of Bliss: Buddhist Meditational Art. Chicago: Serindia Publications, 2003. GRAY, David B. The Cakrasamvara Tantra: the discourse of Śrī Heruka (Śrīherukābhidhāna). New York: American Institute of Buddhist Studies at Columbia University, 2007. JACKSON, David. The Place of Provenance. Regional Styles in Tibetan Paintings. New York: Rubin Museum of Art, 2012. JACKSON, David - JACKSON, Janice. Tibetan Thangka

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Libro del exercicio de las armas: A New Pietro Monte Manuscript

Abstract

The works of Pietro Monte had been forgotten for many centuries, and only recently have their merits been recognised again. This research note presents a newly discovered manuscript, the Libro del exercicio de las armas, a 19th century copy of the Spanish vernacular version of the Collectanea known as the “Escorial Manuscript”. The discovery is introduced by a brief survey of the citations of this manuscript and its source in the historiography and by a map displaying the known printed copies of the Collectanea. A review of the bibliography and provenance of the manuscript contributes to our understanding of its historical importance.

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