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Risky Drinking among Norwegian Students: Associations with Participation in the Introductory Week, Academic Performance and Alcohol-related Attitudes

Abstract

AIMS – Substantial increase in heavy drinking upon transition from high school to college is common. Norwegian universities and university colleges arrange yearly introductory weeks to welcome new students. It has been questioned whether these events are too centered on alcohol. We aimed to investigate whether participation in the introductory week is associated with risky drinking (RD). We further aimed to investigate whether RD is associated with academic performance. Finally, we investigated whether alcohol-related attitudes are associated with both RD and introductory week participation.

DESIGN – Data from the Norwegian study of students’ health and well-being (SHoT, 2014, n=13,663) were used. The odds ratio (OR) of RD was calculated for individuals having participated in the introductory week compared to others. Different measures of academic performance (having failed exams, study progression and study-related self-efficacy (SRSE)) were compared between individuals reporting RD compared to others. The association between attitudes and participation in the event and RD was investigated.

RESULTS – Individuals having participated in the introductory week are more likely to report RD (OR (95%CI) = 2.41 (2.12-2.74)). Individuals reporting RD report lower SRSE and are more likely to have failed exams more than once. Study progression is unassociated with RD. Liberal alcohol-related attitudes are associated with participation in the event and RD.

CONCLUSIONS – RD among students is associated with participation in the introductory week and with poorer academic performance. The university introductory week might be in danger of excluding individuals who do not drink much, or of promoting an unhealthy drinking culture among students.

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Risky drinking among Norwegian students: associations with participation in the introductory week, academic performance and alcohol-related attitudes

Abstract

AIMS – Substantial increase in heavy drinking upon transition from high school to college is common. Norwegian universities and university colleges arrange yearly introductory weeks to welcome new students. It has been questioned whether these events are too centered on alcohol. We aimed to investigate whether participation in the introductory week is associated with risky drinking (RD). We further aimed to investigate whether RD is associated with academic performance. Finally, we investigated whether alcohol-related attitudes are associated with both RD and introductory week participation. DESIGN – Data from the Norwegian study of students’ health and well-being (SHoT, 2014, n=13,663) were used. The odds ratio (OR) of RD was calculated for individuals having participated in the introductory week compared to others. Different measures of academic performance (having failed exams, study progression and study-related self-efficacy (SRSE)) were compared between individuals reporting RD compared to others. The association between attitudes and participation in the event and RD was investigated. RESULTS – Individuals having participated in the introductory week are more likely to report RD (OR (95%CI) = 2.41 (2.12-2.74)). Individuals reporting RD report lower SRSE and are more likely to have failed exams more than once. Study progression is unassociated with RD. Liberal alcohol-related attitudes are associated with participation in the event and RD. CONCLUSIONS – RD among students is associated with participation in the introductory week and with poorer academic performance. The university introductory week might be in danger of excluding individuals who do not drink much, or of promoting an unhealthy drinking culture among students.

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Significant life events and social connectedness in Australian women’s gambling experiences

Abstract

AIM - The aim is to examine significant life events and social connections that encourage some women to gamble. Specifically, how do these events and connections described as important for women who develop gambling-related problems differ for women who remain recreational gamblers? DESIGN - 20 women who were electronic gaming machine (EGMs, poker machines, slots) players were interviewed using a brief interview guide. They also completed the nine question Problem Gambling Severity Index (PGSI) from the Canadian Problem Gambling Index CPGI). 11 women self-identified as recreational gamblers (RG) while 9 had sought and received help for their gambling problems (PG). Using a feminist, qualitative design and an adaptive grounded theory method to analyze their histories, a number of themes emerged indicating a progression to problem gambling for some and the ability to recognise when control over gambling was needed by others. RESULTS - Although both groups (RG and PG) reported common gambling motivations differences appeared in the strength of their social support networks and ways of coping with stress, especially stress associated with a significant life event. CONCLUSIONS - The human need for social connectedness and personal bonds with others emphasised the usefulness of using social capital theories in gambling research with women.

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Significant life events and social connectedness in Australian women’s gambling experiences

Abstract

AIM - The aim is to examine significant life events and social connections that encourage some women to gamble. Specifically, how do these events and connections described as important for women who develop gambling-related problems differ for women who remain recreational gamblers? DESIGN - 20 women who were electronic gaming machine (EGMs, poker machines, slots) players were interviewed using a brief interview guide. They also completed the nine question Problem Gambling Severity Index (PGSI) from the Canadian Problem Gambling Index CPGI). 11 women self-identified as recreational gamblers (RG) while 9 had sought and received help for their gambling problems (PG). Using a feminist, qualitative design and an adaptive grounded theory method to analyze their histories, a number of themes emerged indicating a progression to problem gambling for some and the ability to recognise when control over gambling was needed by others. RESULTS - Although both groups (RG and PG) reported common gambling motivations differences appeared in the strength of their social support networks and ways of coping with stress, especially stress associated with a significant life event. CONCLUSIONS - The human need for social connectedness and personal bonds with others emphasised the usefulness of using social capital theories in gambling research with women.

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Conceptualisation of Theatrical Characters in the Digital Paradigm: Needs, Problems and Foreseen Solutions

-151 Moretti, F. (2011). “Network theory, plot analysis”. New Left Review . 68 (March-April). 80-102. Phelan, J. (1989). Reading people, reading plots. Character, Progression and the Interpretation of Narratives . Chicago and London: The University of Chicago Press. Prince, G. (1987). Dictionary of Narratology . Lincoln: University of Nebraska Press. Steggle, M. (2015). Digital Humanities and the Lost Drama of Early Modern England: ten case studies . London: Ashgate. Zöllner-Weber, A. (2009). Noctua literaria – A Computer Aided Approach for the

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New Indicators to Compare and Evaluate Harmful Drug Use Among Adolescents in 38 European Countries

Substance Use And Self-Reported Suicide Attempts By Adolescents In 16 European Countries. European Child & Adolescent Psychiatry , 21 , 443–450. MacKesy-Amiti, M. E., Fendrich, M., & Goldstein, P. J. (1997). Sequence Of Drug Use Among Serious Drug Users: Typical Vs. Atypical Progression . Drug And Alcohol Dependence, 45 , 185–196. Martin, C. S., Kaczynski, N. A., Maisto, S. A., & Tarter, R. E. (1996). Polydrug Use In Adolescent Drinkers With And Without Dsm-Iv Alcohol Abuse And Dependence. Alcoholism: Clinical And Experimental Research , 20 , 1099–1108. Miller

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Polydrug Use by European Adolescents in the Context of Other Problem Behaviours

to be considered as a risk marker? The European Journal of Public Health, 18 (6), 626–629. Jessor R., & Jessor S. L. (1977). Problem behavior and psychosocial development: A longitudinal study of youth . New York: Academic Press. Johnston, L. D., O’Malley, P. M., Bachman, J. G., & Schulenberg, J. E. (2008). Monitoring the Future national results on adolescent drug use: Overview of key fndings . Bethesda, MD: National Institute on Drug Abuse: NIH Publication No. 09-7401. Kandel, D. B., Yamaguchi, K., & Chen, K. (1992). Stages of progression in drug

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Best friend’s and family members’ smoking habits and parental divorce during childhood are associated with smoking in adulthood

family. Health Education Research. Theory & Practice 11 (3): 309-315 Pennanen, M. & Vartiainen, E. & Haukkala A. (2012): The role of family factors and school achievement in the progression of adolescents to regular smoking. Health Education Research 27(1): 57-68 Petraitis, J. & Flay, B.R. & Miller, T.Q. (1995): Reviewing theories of adolescent substance use: Organizing pieces in the puzzle. Psychological Bulletin 117 (1): 67-86 Rainio, S. & Pere, L. & Lindfors, P. (2009): The adolescent health and lifestyle survey 2009

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At-risk and problem gambling among Finnish youth: The examination of risky alcohol consumption, tobacco smoking, mental health and loneliness as gender-specific correlates

: Longitudinal effects and the role of demographic characteristics. Journal of Psychology: Interdisciplinary and Applied, 146, 105-118. Schulenberg, J. E., & Maggs, J. L. (2002). A developmental perspective on alcohol use and heavy drinking during adolescence and the transition to young adulthood. Journal of Studies on Alcohol, Supplement(14), 54-70. Schulte, M. T., Ramo, D., & Brown, S. A. (2009). Gender differences in factors influencing alcohol use and drinking progression among adolescents. Clinical Psychology Review, 29(6), 535

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Policy on drugs in Norwegian prisons: Increased control, answers to poverties and looking for a life after release

Storberget, K. (2010): Progresjon i soningen - ny giv for innsatte med avhengighetsproblemer [Progression in serving the sentence - a new start for inmates with drug dependence problems]. Interview K.Reinås. Tidsskriftet mot rusgift 92/93. (Ref. 15.2.2010. Online: www.fmr.no) Syse, A. (2011): Hva er galt med norsk narkotikapolitikk? [What is wrong with Norwegian drug policy?] In: Festskrift till Lotta Vahlne Westerhäll [Festschrift for Lotta Vahlne Westerhäll]. Stockholm: Santeus Förlag Thorsen, L. (2004): Kriminalisering av fattige

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