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Son Preference, Parity Progression and Contraceptive Use in South Asia

. (2013). The implementation of preferences for male offspring. Population and Development Review, 39(2): 185-208. Brunson, J. (2010). Son preference in the context of fertility decline: Limits to new constructions of gender and kinship in Nepal. Studies in Family Planning, 41(2): 89-98. Chaudhuri, S. (2012). The desire for sons and excess fertility: A household-level analysis of parity progression in India. International Perspectives on Sexual and Reproductive Health, 38(4): 178-186. Dahal, G.P., Padmadas, S.S., et al. (2008). Fertility

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Molecular Biology and Genetic Mechanisms in the Progression of the Malignant Skin Melanoma

, Kumasaka MY, Thang ND et al. RAS/RAF/MEK/ERK and PI3K/PTEN/AKT Signali ng in Malignant Melanoma Progression and Therapy. Dermatol Res Pract. 2012; 2012: 354191. 21. Nogueira C, Kim KH, Sung H et al. Cooperative interactions of PTEN deficiency and RAS activation in melanoma metastasis. Oncogene. 2010; 29(47): 6222–32. 22. Scatolini M, Grand MM, Grosso E et al. Altered molecular pathways in melanocytic lesions. Int J Cancer. 2010; 126(8): 1869–81. 23. Jakob JA, Bassett RL Jr, Ng CS et al. NRAS mutation status is an independent prognostic factor in

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Teacher’s conceptions of quality in dance education expressed through grade conferences

Abstract

The aim of the study is to illuminate a teacher‘s conceptions of quality expressed through verbal and non-verbal actions in relation to summative assessments of dance knowledge. The following research questions are considered in the study: What conceptions of quality emerge during grade conferences? In what ways do teacher’s conceptions of quality reflect knowledge hierarchies? How do the teacher’s and student’s conceptions of quality relate to each other? To grasp the phenomenon, material was gathered during observations in a Swedish upper secondary school and from the teacher’s written reflections. Individual grading conversations were observed between the teacher and ten students attending a course called Dance technique 1. In the analytical process, the phenomenon was seen, broadened out, varied, and then condensed into two themes: conceptions of quality expressed through the teacher‘s focus on abilities and conceptions of quality expressed through views on the progression of dance knowledge.

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Risky drinking among Norwegian students: associations with participation in the introductory week, academic performance and alcohol-related attitudes

Abstract

AIMS – Substantial increase in heavy drinking upon transition from high school to college is common. Norwegian universities and university colleges arrange yearly introductory weeks to welcome new students. It has been questioned whether these events are too centered on alcohol. We aimed to investigate whether participation in the introductory week is associated with risky drinking (RD). We further aimed to investigate whether RD is associated with academic performance. Finally, we investigated whether alcohol-related attitudes are associated with both RD and introductory week participation. DESIGN – Data from the Norwegian study of students’ health and well-being (SHoT, 2014, n=13,663) were used. The odds ratio (OR) of RD was calculated for individuals having participated in the introductory week compared to others. Different measures of academic performance (having failed exams, study progression and study-related self-efficacy (SRSE)) were compared between individuals reporting RD compared to others. The association between attitudes and participation in the event and RD was investigated. RESULTS – Individuals having participated in the introductory week are more likely to report RD (OR (95%CI) = 2.41 (2.12-2.74)). Individuals reporting RD report lower SRSE and are more likely to have failed exams more than once. Study progression is unassociated with RD. Liberal alcohol-related attitudes are associated with participation in the event and RD. CONCLUSIONS – RD among students is associated with participation in the introductory week and with poorer academic performance. The university introductory week might be in danger of excluding individuals who do not drink much, or of promoting an unhealthy drinking culture among students.

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Risky Drinking among Norwegian Students: Associations with Participation in the Introductory Week, Academic Performance and Alcohol-related Attitudes

Abstract

AIMS – Substantial increase in heavy drinking upon transition from high school to college is common. Norwegian universities and university colleges arrange yearly introductory weeks to welcome new students. It has been questioned whether these events are too centered on alcohol. We aimed to investigate whether participation in the introductory week is associated with risky drinking (RD). We further aimed to investigate whether RD is associated with academic performance. Finally, we investigated whether alcohol-related attitudes are associated with both RD and introductory week participation.

DESIGN – Data from the Norwegian study of students’ health and well-being (SHoT, 2014, n=13,663) were used. The odds ratio (OR) of RD was calculated for individuals having participated in the introductory week compared to others. Different measures of academic performance (having failed exams, study progression and study-related self-efficacy (SRSE)) were compared between individuals reporting RD compared to others. The association between attitudes and participation in the event and RD was investigated.

RESULTS – Individuals having participated in the introductory week are more likely to report RD (OR (95%CI) = 2.41 (2.12-2.74)). Individuals reporting RD report lower SRSE and are more likely to have failed exams more than once. Study progression is unassociated with RD. Liberal alcohol-related attitudes are associated with participation in the event and RD.

CONCLUSIONS – RD among students is associated with participation in the introductory week and with poorer academic performance. The university introductory week might be in danger of excluding individuals who do not drink much, or of promoting an unhealthy drinking culture among students.

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Significant life events and social connectedness in Australian women’s gambling experiences

Abstract

AIM - The aim is to examine significant life events and social connections that encourage some women to gamble. Specifically, how do these events and connections described as important for women who develop gambling-related problems differ for women who remain recreational gamblers? DESIGN - 20 women who were electronic gaming machine (EGMs, poker machines, slots) players were interviewed using a brief interview guide. They also completed the nine question Problem Gambling Severity Index (PGSI) from the Canadian Problem Gambling Index CPGI). 11 women self-identified as recreational gamblers (RG) while 9 had sought and received help for their gambling problems (PG). Using a feminist, qualitative design and an adaptive grounded theory method to analyze their histories, a number of themes emerged indicating a progression to problem gambling for some and the ability to recognise when control over gambling was needed by others. RESULTS - Although both groups (RG and PG) reported common gambling motivations differences appeared in the strength of their social support networks and ways of coping with stress, especially stress associated with a significant life event. CONCLUSIONS - The human need for social connectedness and personal bonds with others emphasised the usefulness of using social capital theories in gambling research with women.

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Significant life events and social connectedness in Australian women’s gambling experiences

Abstract

AIM - The aim is to examine significant life events and social connections that encourage some women to gamble. Specifically, how do these events and connections described as important for women who develop gambling-related problems differ for women who remain recreational gamblers? DESIGN - 20 women who were electronic gaming machine (EGMs, poker machines, slots) players were interviewed using a brief interview guide. They also completed the nine question Problem Gambling Severity Index (PGSI) from the Canadian Problem Gambling Index CPGI). 11 women self-identified as recreational gamblers (RG) while 9 had sought and received help for their gambling problems (PG). Using a feminist, qualitative design and an adaptive grounded theory method to analyze their histories, a number of themes emerged indicating a progression to problem gambling for some and the ability to recognise when control over gambling was needed by others. RESULTS - Although both groups (RG and PG) reported common gambling motivations differences appeared in the strength of their social support networks and ways of coping with stress, especially stress associated with a significant life event. CONCLUSIONS - The human need for social connectedness and personal bonds with others emphasised the usefulness of using social capital theories in gambling research with women.

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Freedom and obedience in western education

Abstract

Education has to emphasize the characteristics which define Western democratic societies. In addition, it has to ensure the active and participative inclusion of each person in social life, where respect for human rights prevails over the person’s preferred ideology. Promoting these values in citizens not only guarantees the stability of the state, but also its constant progression and improvement. Beginning at the elementary level, the promotion of students’ critical spirit is recognized as a fundamental objectives. However, the structures which shape Western education in the 21st century do not allow for the development of completely autonomous thinking and critical thinking in students. In this article, we analyze the processes which comprise an education for obedience. Although obedience does not respond to conscious cognitive processes, it is present in the structural rigidity of education through the organization of the classroom. Our explanation is based on the Theory of Social Conformity, which will be presented as the antithesis of a person’s individual freedom. Moreover, we will see how contaminated cognitive vicarious elements are promoted. Although they are endemic to people, they do not allow students to develop a critical spirit or to be educated for freedom.

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Comparative Kinetic Methods used for the Therapy of Idiopathic Scoliosis in Adolescents

References 1. Reamy BV, Slakey JB. (2001) Adolescent idiopathic scoliosis: review and current concepts. Am Fam Physician;64(1):111-6. 2. Charles YP, Daures JP, de Rosa V, Dimeglio A. (2006) Progression risk of idiopathic juvenile scoliosis during pubertal growth. Spine (Phila Pa 1976);31(17):1933-42. 3. Xhardez Y. (2010) Vade-mecum de kinesitherapie et de reeducation fonctionnelle. Editions Maloine, Paris, France 4. Weiss HR. (2011) The method of Katharina Schroth - history, principles and current development. Scoliosis;6

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Conceptualisation of Theatrical Characters in the Digital Paradigm: Needs, Problems and Foreseen Solutions

-151 Moretti, F. (2011). “Network theory, plot analysis”. New Left Review . 68 (March-April). 80-102. Phelan, J. (1989). Reading people, reading plots. Character, Progression and the Interpretation of Narratives . Chicago and London: The University of Chicago Press. Prince, G. (1987). Dictionary of Narratology . Lincoln: University of Nebraska Press. Steggle, M. (2015). Digital Humanities and the Lost Drama of Early Modern England: ten case studies . London: Ashgate. Zöllner-Weber, A. (2009). Noctua literaria – A Computer Aided Approach for the

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