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Medication review in inpatients at cardiology clinic / Prehodnotenie terapie u hospitalizovaných pacientov na kardiologickej klinike

can clinical pharmacy profession be used at the emergency wards? SJTREM, 2012; 20 (2 suppl): 25. [15] World Health Organization: High 5`s: Action on patient safety. (http://www.safetyandquality.gov.au/our-work/medicationsafety/medication-reconciliation/who-high-5s-medicationreconciliation-program/). Accessed January 6, 2014 [16] World Health Organization: High 5`s: Assuring medication accuracy at transitions in care: Medication reconciliation. (http://www.who.int/patientsafety/implementation/solutions/high5s/ps_med_rec_fs_Mar_2011.pdf

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Pharmacy employees’ self-rated knowledge, use and attitudes toward homeopathy: a comparative survey in sweden and germany

-High Dilutions: What Progress Is Being Made?’ Homeopathy 102: 151-54. [4] Bjerså, Kristofer, Anna Forsberg, and Monika Fagevik. 2011. ‘Perceptions of Complementary Therapies among Swedish Registered Professions in Surgical Care.’ Complementary Therapies in Clinical Practice 17. Elsevier Ltd: 44-49. [5] Bjerså, Kristofer, Elisabet Stener Victorin, and Monika Fagevik Olsén. 2012. ‘Knowledge about Complementary, Alternative and Integrative Medicine (CAM) among Registered Health Care Providers in Swedish Surgical Care : A National Survey among

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Learning with colleagues through peer review: the Dutch experience

Abstract

The Verpleegkundigen & Verzorgenden Nederland Verpleegkundig Specialisten (V&VN VS), the Dutch professional organisation representing nurse practitioners, has introduced a requirement for advanced practice (registered) nurses (APRN) who wish to be eligible for reregistration within five years to participate in a peer review group for at least eight hours per year. In 2013, five APRNs caring for people with haemophilia and other bleeding disorders in the Netherlands formed a peer review group. As no framework was available, research was undertaken through reviewing literature and engaging in exploratory discussions within the profession in order to identify best practice in establishing such a group. The initial meeting of the new peer review group agreed possible methodologies and established meeting rules. After four meetings, some initial conclusions can now be drawn on the benefits of this specialised haemophilia peer review group. Overall, it is clear that participation in a forum in which knowledge and expertise are shared, contributes to the professionalism of the APRN.

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Haemophilia nursing practice: A global survey of roles and responsibilities

Abstract

Haemophilia nursing roles continue to develop alongside nursing as a profession. There are now nurses who practice autonomously, much like a medical practitioner, and many who have extended their roles to deliver direct patient care, education and research. There has been little, if any, comparison with haemophilia nurse roles internationally, nor of the impact of these roles on patient reported outcomes. This paper reports the results of an international survey, of 297 haemophilia nurses from 22 countries, describing current day practice and care. Many nurses work above and beyond their funded hours to improve care through research and evidence-based practice. While some are able to attend international meetings to report and discover this evidence, many due to financial constraints, are not. Others reported difficulty with communicating in English, which limited congress attendance. With on-line learning capability, sharing of best practice is now possible, and this approach should be a platform developed in coming years to further enhance haemophilia nursing practice and ultimately patient care.

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Commemoration of Kárpáti Gizella, the first woman who took her degree in medical science in Kolozsvár at Ferenc József University

Abstract

On 31st of December 1895 Gyula Wlassics (1852-1937), minister of religion and education, published his Decree No 72 039, which allowed women to study medical science, pharmacy and humanities at universities. In Kolozsvár Gizella Kárpáti was the first woman who registered at the Faculty of Medicine of Ferenc József University.

Gizella Kárpáti was born in Kolozsvár on 3rd August 1884. After finishing secondary school in June 1902, in the autumn of the same year she registered at the Faculty of Medicine. The marks she got at the university examinations in the following 10 semesters proved that she could cope with her task. In the years spent at the university she met medical student József Szabó (born in 1882) whom she married later. They both started their medical career at Károly Lechner’s Neuro-Psychiatry Institute. From 1909 Gizella Kárpáti was a payed assistant, from 1911 she became assistant lecturer. Her husband became an assistant lecturer from the year 1908, then he was appointed lecturer and then honorary lecturer. Meanwhile he had to go to the front where he was followed by his wife. In 1919, after the professors of the university refused the act of swearing the oath of allegiance, they both made their escape from Kolozsvár together with the greater part of their fellow professors. After a short time they settled in Szeged, where József Szabó was appointed university professor. Here he published his book „Elmekórtan” in 1925. In the 1927-28 academic year he became dean, then vice-dean of the Faculty of Medicine, but in the year 1929 he died unexpectedly. In Szeged, Gizella Kárpáti being engaged in bringing up her two children, did not work as a physician. One of her children, Miklós, continued his parents’ profession, and became a physician. Gizella and her children returned to Kolozsvár for a short time, between 1940-1944, then they moved to Budapest and finally they settled in Szeged again. In 1929 József Szabó and in 1953 Gizella Kárpáti were entombed in one of the graves of honour of the Szeged central cemetery.

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Does a patient’s personality style impact health outcomes?

;37(2):309-25. 4. Losa Iglesias ME, Becerro de Bengoa Vallejo R. Conflict resolution styles in the nursing profession. Contemp Nurse 2012;43:73-80. 5. Kilmann R. Conflict management and change management case study with the TKI tool [video]. 2014. Available from: http://youtu.be/Tnf1OKoGSys (accessed 21 April 2016). 6. Whitworth BS. (2008), Is there a relationship between personality type and preferred conflict-handling styles? An exploratory study of registered nurses in southern Mississippi. J Nurs Manag 2008;16:921-32. doi: 10.1111/j.1365

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Burnout syndrome among ICU personnel

:482-488. 12. Soares J.J.F, Grossi G, Sundin Ö. Burnout among women: association with demographic/socio-economic, work, lifestyle and health factors. Archieves of Woman’s Menthal Health. 2007; 10:61-71. 13. Etzion D. Moderating effect of social support on the stress-burnout relationship. Journal of Applied Psychology. 1984; 69:615-22. 14. Canadas-De la Fuente G, Vargas C et al. Risk factors and prevalence of burnout syndrome in the nursing profession. International Journal of Nursing Studies. 2015; 52:240-9. 15. Teixeira C, Ribeiro O et al. Burnout in

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Comparative characteristics of professional predispositions of medical personnel

;15(3):129-40. 4. Baldacchino DR, Galea P. Student nurses’ personality traits and the nursing profession: part 2. Br J Nurs., 2012;21(9):530-5. 5. Watson R, Deary I, Thompson D, Li G. A study of stress and burn-out in nursing students in Hong Kong: a questionnaire survey. Int J Nurs Stud. 2008; 45(10):1534-42. 6. Jenkins SH, Astroth KS, Woith WM. Non-Critical-Care Nurses’ Perceptions of Facilitators and Barriers to Rapid Response Team Activation. J Nurses Prof Dev., 2015;31(5):264-70. 7. Shimizutani M1, Odagiri Y, Ohya Y, Shimomitsu T, Kristensen TS, Maruta T

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Review paper. Does genius border on insanity? Part I: A relationship between creativity and the presence of psychopathological symptoms in bipolar disorder

mood disorders. Dialogues in clinical neuroscience. 2008; 10(2)2: 251 -255. 31. Prisciandaro J.Predictors of clinical trial dropout in individuals with co-occurring bipolar disorder and alcohol dependence. Drug and alcohol dependence. 2011; 118(2-3):493 -496. 32. Ludwig A. Creative achievement and psychopatology. Comparison among professions. In: Runco, M. Richards, R. Emintent creativity, everyday creativity, and health. Ablex, Greenwich. 1997. 33. Soeiro-de-Souza M.G. Soares D, Post R, Moreno R.A. Creativity and

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Eveningness and its possibility of predicting burnout symptoms among physicians and nurses – preliminary results

–41. Available from: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.cpr.2015.01.004 5. Chiu LYL, Stewart K, Woo C, Yatham LN, Lam RW. The relationship between burnout and depressive symptoms in patients with depressive disorders. J Affect Disord. 2015;172(January):361–6. 6. Canadas-De la Fuente GA, Vargas C, San Luis C, Garcia I, Can, Adas GR, et al. Risk factors and prevalence of burnout syndrome in the nursing profession. Int J Nurs Stud. 2015;52(1):240–9. 7. Embriaco N, Hraiech S, Azoulay E, Baumstarck-Barrau K, Forel J-M, Kentish-Barnes N, et al. Symptoms of depression in

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