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The writer’s pragmatic aims attainment in Doris Lessing’s To Room Nineteen: A cognitive linguistics view

References Bara, B. G., Tirassa, M., 2000. Neuropragmatics: brain and communication. Brain and Language , vol. 71, no. 1, pp. 10-14. Bara, B. G., 2010. Cognitive pragmatics: The mental processes of communication (translated by John Douthwaite). Cambridge: A Bradford Book. Bortolussi, M., Dixon, P., 1996. Literary communication: Effects of reader-narrator cooperation. Poetics , vol. 23, pp. 405-430. Bystrov, Y., 2014. Fractal metaphor LIFE IS A STORY in biographical narrative. Topics in Linguistics , vol. 14, no. 1, pp. 1

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Interviewing in the Medical Context: Questions, Answers, Assessments – An Interdisciplinary Approach

Abstract

There has been a large amount of research done on doctor-patient encounters analysing the linguistic and discursive peculiarities occurring in these interactions. Though many relevant features of medical interviewing are well-known to the scientific public, there are still areas for further investigation. One of these areas is the sequential organisation of the dialogues between patients and doctors.

This paper aims to show the pragmatic means that contribute to the efficacy of doctor-patient talk. As a method, the contribution applies the Sociocognitive Approach to Critical Discourse Analysis. The sequential organisation of therapeutic dialogues involves the use of particular speech acts (questions, answers, assessments) that are characteristic of the comforting and confirming procedures of the therapist. The paper intends to analyse the parts of the therapeutic interview (initiation, exploration and termination) to show patient-centredness in interviewing and the sequential organisation of empathy and confirmation with the help of an interview transcript between a doctor and patient after a renal transplant.

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The construction of cooperative and inferential meaning by children with Asperger syndrome

References Ackerman, B.P., 1981. When is a question not answered? The understanding of young children of utterances violating or conforming to the rule of conversational sequencing. Journal of Experimental Child Psychology , vol. 31, no. 3, pp. 487-507. American Psychiatric Association, 2014. Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders , 5th edition. Arlington, VA: American Psychiatric Association. Attardo, S., 1993. Violation of conversational maxims and cooperation: the case of jokes. Journal of Pragmatics , vol. 19, no. 6, pp

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The ‘indisciplinarity’ of stylistics

Abstract

This paper aims at showing why the stylistician can be construed as a prolific “impostor” in a most positive sense: pledged to no specific linguistic prophet, she can opt for different theoretical linguistic tools (in the sphere of pragmatics, critical discourse analysis, cognitive grammar, etc.) depending on her object of study and what her research question is. The liberty claimed by the stylistician explains why stylistics is the “undisciplined” child of linguistics, shirking any clear definition of its boundaries. It will be argued that stylistics can only exist as a cross-disciplinary field given its conception of language as fundamentally contextualized. If it was a discipline determined by clear-cut pre-established boundaries, stylistics would be far more “disciplined” but would run the risk of serving only itself. The broad goal of this paper is thus to evince that the “indisciplinarity” of stylistics constitutes its very defining essence. With this aim in mind, it will demonstrate what stylistics owes to other disciplines, what it shares with similar language-based disciplines and what it can offer to other fields or practices of knowledge.

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Hedging in Political Discourse: Evidence from the Speeches of King Abdullah II of Jordan

Abstract

This paper reports on the findings of a study that aimed to identify the linguistic items which act as hedges in the speeches of King Abdullah II of Jordan, as well as to examine the pragmatic functions of these devices. Twenty-five political speeches of King Abdullah II, randomly selected from the official website of King Abdullah (see Appendix), were analyzed adopting Salager-Meyer’s (1994) taxonomy. The study revealed that the most frequently used hedging device in King Abdullah’s speech is modal auxiliaries, and the most frequently used hedging device subcategory is the modal auxiliary “can”. The findings suggest that these hedging devices fulfil several pragmatic functions. These findings contribute to understanding that speaking a second language (Arabic, in the case of King Abdullah II) neither affects the types of hedging devices nor the functions these devices perform. Moreover, contrary to scientific discourse (e.g., medicine), the research concludes that political discourse as a non-scientific genre resorts to hedging devices to express indirectness, politeness, lack of commitment and probability.

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