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Negation and infinity

Abstract

Infinity and negation are in various relations and interdependencies one to another. The analysis of negation and infinity aims to better understanding them. Semantical, syntactical, and pragmatic issues will be considered.

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On Some of the Aspects of the Linguistic Theory of Law

Abstract

The article analyses the approach to the study of the sphere of language between theory of law and the philosophy of language. The aim of the paper is to study the range of applicability of philosophical and linguistic conceptions in theory of law. Law theory reflects certain movements and controversies that have been significant in linguistic sciences. The analyses, which, so far, have been conducted in theory of law, concentrated mainly on the use of the results of such achievements made by the representatives of the philosophy of language and linguistics as formal languages theories, transformational-generative theories, structuralism, formalism, pragmalinguistics. In this article, it is claimed that contemporary changes in the humanities justify the expansion of the range of jurisprudence integration to some other approaches, different from formalistic and pragmatic ones.

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A Logical Conceptualization of Knowledge on the Notion of Language Communication

. (eds.), 7–22. Montague, R. (1970a). ‘Pragmatics and Intensional Logic’, Synthese 22, 68–94. Montague, R. (1970b). ‘English as a Formal Language’, in: Visentini B. et al. (eds.), Linguaggi nella Societa e nella Technica , Edizioni di Comunita, Milan, pp. 189–224. Montague R. (1970c). ‘Universal Grammar’, Theoria 36, 373–398. Montague R. (1974). Formal Philosophy: Selected Papers , ed. and introd. Thomason R.H., New Haven, Conn,: Yale University Press. Peirce S.Ch. (1931–35). Collected Papers of Charles Sanders Peirce , Hartshorne C

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Causal Concepts Guiding Model Specification in Systems Biology

Abstract

In this paper I analyze the process by which modelers in systems biology arrive at an adequate representation of the biological structures thought to underlie data gathered from high-throughput experiments. Contrary to views that causal claims and explanations are rare in systems biology, I argue that in many studies of gene regulatory networks modelers aim at a representation of causal structure. In addressing modeling challenges, they draw on assumptions informed by theory and pragmatic considerations in a manner that is guided by an interventionist conception of causal structure. While doubts have been raised about the applicability of this notion of causality to complex biological systems, it is here seen to be an adequate guide to inquiry.

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