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Pharmacokinetics of Ciprofloxacin in Broiler Chickens After Single Intravenous and Intraingluvial Administration

). Pharmacokinetics, renal clearance and metabolism of ciprofloxacin following intravenous and oral administration to calves and pigs. Veterinary Quarterly 10, 156-163. https://doi.org/10.1080/01652176.1988.9694165 PMid:3176294 7. Walker, R.D., Stein, G.E., Hauptman, J.G., MacDonald, K.H., Budsberg, S.C., Rosser, E.J.Jr. (1990). Serum and tissue cage fluid concentrations of ciprofloxacin after oral administration of the drug to healthy dogs. American Journal of Veterinary Research 51, 896-900. 8. Parikh, V., Shivprakash, K., Patel, D., Gandhi, T

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Pharmacokinetic Behavior of Marbofloxacin in Plasma from Chickens at Different Seasons

., Wang, L., Shen, X., Gu, X., Zeng, D., Zeng, Z. (2013). Plasma and tissue pharmacokinetics of marbofloxacin in experimentally infected chickens with Mycoplasma gallisepticum and Escherichia coli. J. Vet. Pharmacol. Ther. 36, 511-515. https://doi.org/10.1111/jvp.12049 PMid:23550715 5. El-Komy, A., Attia, T., El Latif, A., Fathy, H. (2016). Bioavailability pharmacokinetics and residues of marbofloxacin in normal and E. coli infected broiler chicken. In. J. Pharmacol. Tox. 2 (4): 144-149. 6. Huang, X., Chen, Z., Zhang, S., Zeng, Z. (2003). Influence of

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Pharmacokinetics of Doxycycline in Ducks with Steatosis due to Force-feeding

REFERENCES 1. Pijpers, A., Van Klingeren, B., Schoevers, E.J., Verheijden, J.H.M., Van Miert, A.S. (1989). In vitro activity of five tetracyclines and some other antimicrobial agents four porcine respiratory tract pathogens. J. Vet. Pharmacol. Ther. 12, 267–276. http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1365-2885.1989.tb00670.x PMid:2810475 2. Anadón, A., Martínez-Larra-aga, M.R., Diaz, M.J., Bringas, P., Fernandez, M.C., Fernandez-Cruz, M.L., Iturbe, J., Martínez, M.A. (1994). Pharmacokinetics of doxycycline in broiler chickens. Avian Pathol. 23, 79-90. http

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Comparative Study of the Pharmacokinetics of Inorganic and Organic Iron Compounds in Broiler Chickens

References 1. Geisser, P., Burckhardt, S. (2011). The Pharmacokinetics and Pharmacodynamics of Iron preparations. Pharmaceutics, 3(1): 12-33. 2. Egli, A. K., Franstad, T., Gramingen, D. (1998). The effect of per oral administration of aminoacid chelated iron to pregnant sows in prevention sow and piglet anemia. Acta Veterinaria Scandinavica 39(1): 77-87. 3. Andrews, N. C. (1999). Disorders of iron metabolism. The New England Journal of Medicine 341, 1986-1995. 4. Kalantaz-Zadeh, K. E., Steja, E

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Development of a UHPLC-MS/MS method for the determination of quercetin in milk and its application to a pharmacokinetic study

References 1. de Boer V.C., Dihal A.A., van der Woude H., Arts I.C., Wolffram S., Alink G.M., Rietjens I.M., Keijer J., Hollman P.C.: Tissue distribution of quercetin in rats and pigs. J Nutrit 2005, 135, 1718–1725. 2. Chang L., Ren Y., Cao L., Sun Y., Sun Q., Sheng N., Yuan L., Zhi X., Zhang L.: Simultaneous determination and pharmacokinetic study of six flavonoids from Fructus Sophorae extract in rat plasma by LC–MS/MS. J Chrom B 2012, 904, 59–64. 3. Coppin J.P., Xua Y., Chena H., Pan M.H., Hoc Ch.T., Juliani R., Simon J.E., Wu Q

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Withdrawal of amoxicillin and penicillin G procaine from milk after intramammary administration in dairy cows with mastitis

References 1. Bengtsson B., Jacobsson S.O., Luthman J., Franklin A.: Pharmacokinetics of penicillin-G in ewes and cows in late pregnancy and in early lactation. J Vet Pharmacol Ther 1997, 20, 258–261. 2. Błądek T, Posyniak A, Gajda A, Gbylik M, Żmudzki J.: Multi-class procedure for analysis of antibacterial compounds in animal tissues by liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry. Bull Vet Inst Pulawy 2011, 55, 741–748. 3. Bruno F., Curini R., di Corcia A., Nazzari M., Samperi R.: Solid-phase extraction followed by liquid chromatography

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Pharmacokinetic - pharmacodynamic model and ampicillin residue depletion after intramammary administration in cows

., Marosevic D., Jaglic Z.: Prevalence of mastitis pathogens in milk from clinically healthy cows. Med Weter 2013, 58, 567–575. 4. Christensen J.M., Smith B.B., Murdena S.B., Hollingshead N.: The disposition of five therapeutically important antimicrobial agents in llamas. J Vet Pharmacol Ther 1996, 19, 43–438. 5. Concordet D., Toutain P.L.: The withdrawal time estimation of veterinary drugs revisited. J Vet Pharmacol Ther 1997, 20, 380–386. 6. Craigmill A.L., Pass M.A., Wetzlich S.: Comparative pharmacokinetics of AMX administered intravenously to sheep

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Antihelminic Activity of Carvacrol, Thymol, Cinnamaldehyde and P-Cymen Against the Free-Living Nematode Caenorhabditis elegans and Rat Pinworm Syphacia muris

Abstract

In the present study we tested the dose andh time dependence of the antinematodal effects of carvacrol and tyhmol on Caenorabditis elegans, and the efficacy of carvacrol, thymol, p-cymene and cinnamaldehyde,which were administrated in the drinking water of rats naturally infected with the pinworm Syphacia muris. The control treatment of the infected rats was carried out with piperazine. Thymol caused a dose and time-dependent mortality in adult C. elegans. The value of the Median Lethal Concentration (LC50) of thymol was 117.9nM after 24h and 62.89 nM after 48h of exposure. Carvacrol exhibited a higher antinematodal efficiency than thymol. The LC50 of carvacrol, after 24 hours of exposure, was 53.03 nM, while after 48 hours it was 33.83 nM. On the other hand, piperazine showed an extremely high efficacy against S. muris infection in rats. Piperazine, at a dose of 625 mg/kg bw, administered in drinking water continuously for 10 days, eliminates the infection completely. However, none of the investigated active ingredients of essential oils were effective against S. muris. The reason for the lack of efficiency may be due to their pharmacokinetic properties. A relatively low amount of, orally administered, active ingredients of essential oils reaches the distal segments of the gastrointestinal tract, where S. muris inhabits the gut (colon and cecum). The obtained results, on C. elegans, indicate a clear dose and time-dependent antinematodal effect of thymol and carvacrol. However, for clinical application, it is necessary to examine the efficacy of microencapsulated formulations with a controlled release of active ingredients of essential oils in certain parts of the gastrointestinal tract.

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MAC-Sparing Effect of Transdermal Fentanyl in Sevoflurane-Anesthetized Sheep

REFERENCES 1. Ahern BJ, Soma LR, Rudy JA, Uboh CE, Schaer TP: Pharmacokinetics of fentanyl administered transdermally and intravenously in sheep. Am J Vet Res 2010, 71:1127-1132. 2. Grond S, Radbruch L, Lehmann KA: Clinical pharmacokinetics of transdermal opioids. Clin Pharmacokinet 2000, 38:59-89. 3. Wilson D, Pettifer GR, Hosgood G: Effect of transdermally administered fentanyl on minimum alveolar concentration of isoflurane in normothermic and hypothermic dogs. J Am Vet Med 2006, 228:1042-1046. 4. Yackey M, Ilkiw JE, Pascoe PJ, Tripp LD

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Priapism Following hCG Administration In A Cat

: Priapism in a castrated cat associated with feline infectious peritonitis. J Feline Med Surg 2008, 10:181-184. 6. Swalec KM, Smeak DD: Priapism after castration in a cat. J Am Vet Med Assoc 1989, 195:963-964. 7. Swanson WF, Wolfe BA, Brown JL, Martin-Jimenez T, Riviere JE, Roth TL, Wildt DE: Pharmacokinetics and ovarian-stimulatory effects of equine and human Chorionic Gonadotropins administered singly and in combination in the domestic cat. Biol Reprod 1997, 57:295-302. 8. Cox JE, Redhead PH: Prolonged effect of a single injection of human chorionic

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