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Simona Dobrinas, Alina Soceanu, Gabriela Stanciu and Adriana Culea

Abstract

Measurements of organophosphorus pesticides residues were conducted on four different baby food puree based on vegetable, fruit, white fish and veal, products based on cereals and biscuits packed in cardboard box using gas chromatography with thermoionic specified detector (GC-TSD). The lowest concentration of organophosphorus compounds was found for sulfotep, 0.00006 mg/kg in biscuits, while the highest concentrations were found for diazinon and fenchlorphos, with values of 0.1096 mg/kg and 0.1903 mg/kg, both in the grain samples.

Open access

Mária Valičková, Ján Derco and Katarína Šimovičová

Science and Health - Part B: Pesticides, Food Contaminants, and Agricultural Wastes 31(3): 365-381. Gilliom RJ, Barbash JE, Kolpin DW, Larson SJ (1999) Environmental science technology 33 (7): 164A-169A. Kolpin DW, Barbash JE, Gilliom RJ (1998) Environmental science technology 32 (5): 558-566.

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Mădălina Galaţchi, Andra Oros, Valentina Coatu, Mioara Costache, Dragomir Coprean and Liviu-Daniel Galaţchi

. Terzi, O. Pilger, N. Sarac, Determination of heavy metal levels in fish sample collected from the Middle Black Sea, Kafkas Üniv. Veteriner Fak. Dergisi 16 (2010) 119-125. [19]. Order No. 147/2004 for approving the sanitary veterinary and food safety norms on pesticide residues in animal and non-animal products and residues of veterinary drugs in animal products, Official Journal, 143 of 17 February, 2005 (in Romanian). [20]. V. Coatu, A. Oros, D. Tiganus, L. Lazar, Assessment of chemical contamination in biota from Romanian marine

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Andrea Purdešová and Milena Dömötorová

-61. The Applicant Guide: Maximum Residue Levels, available at http://www.pesticides.gov.uk/au_environment.asp?id=1251, The Pesticides Safety Directorate, York, United Kingdom. Viana E, Moltó JC, Font G (1996) J. Chromatogr. A, 754: 437-478. Villaverde JJ, Sevilla-Morán B, López-Goti C, Alonso-Prados JL, Sandín-España P (2016) Trends in Analytical Chemistry 80: 568-580.

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Mária Andraščíková and Svetlana Hrouzková

/414/EEC. Regulation (EC) No 396/2005. Active substances Pesticide EU-MRL. (2005) Off. J. Eur. Union L70: 1. Djozan D, Ebrahimi B (2008) Anal Chim Acta 616: 152-159. Djozan D, Mahkam M, Ebrahimi B (2009) J Chromatogr A, 1216: 2211-2219. Dong C, Zeng Z, Li X (2005) Talanta 66: 721-727. Feng J, Qiu H, Liu X, Jiang S (2013) Trends Anal Chem 46: 44-58. Filho AM, Neves dos Santos F, Afonso de Paula Pereira P (2008) Talanta 81: 346-354. Ghaemi F, Amiri A, Yunus R (2014) Trends Anal

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Jarmila Hojerová, Martina Beránková, Zuzana Peráčková and Simona Birbičová

: 115-124. Bauer EC, Ogg CL, Sandall LL (2009) Pesticide Safety: Choosing the right gloves. Available in September 2015 at: http://www.ianrpubs.unl.edu/pages/publicationD.jsp?publicationId=1209. Black C, Shaw A, Harned C, Coffman ChW (2014) J. Pesticide Safety Educ., 18: 17-26. Brouwer M, Koeman T, van den Brandt PA, Kromhout H, Schouten LJ, Peters S, Huss A, Vermeulen R (2015) Occup. Environ. Med., 72: 448-455. Cocco P (2002) Cad. Saude Publica, 18: 379-402. EC (2009) Regulation (EC) No

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Jana Svítková, Ľubomír Švorc and Ján Labuda

-1245. Garbellini GS, Uliana CV, Yamanaka H (2013) J. Braz. Chem. Soc. 24: 1942-1949. Greene SA, Pohanish RP (Eds.) (2005) Sittig’s Handbook of Pesticides and Agricultural Chemicals, William Andrew Publishing, Norwich, NY. Ivandini TA, Honda K, Rao TN, Fujishima A, Einaga Y (2007) Talanta 71: 648-655. Jackson SP, Bartek J (2009) Nature 461: 1071-1078. Karasz FE, Jama CT, Delabouglise D, Bouvier P, Livache T, Mailley P, Marcus B, Mermoux M, Petit JP, Szunerits S, Vieil E (2005) Electroanalysis 17: 517

Open access

Stanislava Georgieva, Mona Stancheva and Lubomir Makedonski

Abstract

The aim of this study was to investigate the presence of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), organochlorine pesticides (HCB, DDT and its metabolites) and HCBD in mussels from Bulgarian Black Sea coast. Mussels (Mytilus galloprovincialis) are aquatic organisms which are immobile so that the concentration of pollutants should primarily be considered as an indication of local levels of organochlorine compounds. Samples were collected from three areas of Black Sea coast of Bulgaria in summer 2015.

The fifteen congeners of PCBs, HCB, HCBD, DDT and its metabolites DDE and DDD were performed by gas chromatography system with mass spectrometry detection. The metabolites DDE and DDD were found in all analyzed mussel samples, but PCBs were not detected in any sample. DDE concentrations were found in mussels from 1.09 to 1.63 ng/g wet weight. In mussel total DDT concentrations (2.14 ng/g ww) were found comparable to those in mussels, sampled in 2013 and 2014 (1.87 ng/g ww).

The levels of DDTs and polychlorinated biphenyls in mussels from the Black Sea were found comparable to levels measured in the same molluscs from neighbor seas - Mediterranean Sea and Adriatic Sea.

Open access

Stanislava Georgieva, Mona Stancheva and Lubomir Makedonski

Abstract

Organochlorine pesticides (such as 1,1,1-trichloro - 2,2 - bis (4-chlorophenyl) ethane (DDT) and its metabolites) and polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) are classified as Persistent Organic Pollutants (POPs) and are present in the contamination pattern of marine environments world-wide. Concentrations of PCBs and DDTs were measured in two marine species: garfish (Belone belone) and red mullet (Mullus barbatus). Samples were collected from Black Sea, Bulgaria during 2007 - 2010. The DDTs and PCBs were determined by gas chromatography - mass spectrometry. Concentrations in muscle tissue of garfish ranged from 80.89 to 118.04 ng/g wet weight for total DDTs. DDTs concentration in red mullet was found 104.59 ng/g ww. PCB concentrations in garfish varied in the range of 40.04 and 65.62 ng/g ww. In muscle tissue of red mullet PCB concentrations were found 34.12 ng/g ww. The levels of DDTs and PCBs in garfish and red mullet from the Black Sea were comparable with those found in other marine ecosystem.

Open access

Karol Šimkovič, Ján Derco and Mária Valičková

Abstract

This paper is focused on the possibility of using iron nanoparticles (nZVI - nano zero-valent iron) to remove selected specific synthetic substances, such as hexachlorobutadiene, pentachlorobenzene, hexachlorobenzene, lindane and heptachlor. Experimental measurements were performed in order to evaluate the effectiveness of the removal of substances and their specific removal rate. Evaluation of the results shows that nanoiron NANOFER 25 is a convenient reactant for the removal of heptachlor, lindane and hexachlorobenzene; while for pentachlorbenzene and hexachlorobutadiene removal, longer contact times are necessary to achieve significant removal efficiencies.