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Jovo Radoš

Abstract

The theme presented is aimed at attempting to perceive the fundamental qualities of the man’s personality (body, soul and spirit) from the philosophical, anthropological and theological point of view and, at the same time, to establish the value reflections towards its (current and universal) existential orientations. Namely, today's experience shows us that tendencies with notable prevailing of corporality over the other constitutive properties of the human being are constantly getting stronger. The body cult is vigorously stressed: body building and fitness clubs, as well as special gyms and wellness facilities (saunas, hydro massage baths, tepidariums are advertised, which should satisfy the increased corporal‐hedonistic and corporal‐aesthetic motives. This disturbing of the essential and human structure established by God demands the return to the original settings of Christian trichotomy (not serving the body but serving of the body), whereby a balanced and harmonious relationship between the body, the soul, and the spirit is developed by equally bearing in mind all three areas on which all three "gymnastics" are tuned and effectively performed, which leads to overall development and fulfilment of a human being.

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Ljiljana Leskovic, Goran Vukovič, Robert Leskovar and Jana Goriup

burnout Among Healthcare Employees as Perceived by managers. Journal of Advanced nursing, 60(1), 10-19. Goriup, J., & Purgaj, T. (2009). Nekateri sociološki vidiki razširjenosti mobinga med učitelji v osnovni šoli. Revija za elementarno izobraževanje, 2(4), 5-26. Klančnik Gruden, M. (2003). Sociološki vidiki položaja in vloge medicinskih sester v Sloveniji, študija primera. Ljubljana: Fakulteta za socialno delo. Leskovic, L., Leskovar, R., & Vukovič, G. (2014). Interdisciplinary treatment of combustion phenomenon in

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Vilma Žydžiūnaitė

Abstract

The intellectual leadership of educators or teachers represents a topic of a great interest for educational research and practice. Variety of variables or factors have been examined to find the most complete explanations for teachers’, professors’ and educators’ roles, for example, institutional, financial, gender, organizational, spiritual, and intellectual. No literature was found on the relationship between the demographic variables and researchers’ roles in higher education regarding intellectual leadership. But a lot of studies are focused on the relationship between demographic and other factors in education: job satisfaction, organizational justice, religion, gender, culture, personal and professional roles, stress, mental health, and mobility. The research issue in this study is related to researchers’/scientists’ work in higher education schools and is focused on intellectual leadership, which consists of different roles. It is worth to think about researchers as intellectual leaders and to discover how they recognize or identify their roles in higher education. In this study, findings answer the following research question: “What are the relationships between researchers’ roles and their gender, work experience, dissertation defence date, and research field?” The object of the research study is the researchers’ roles in higher education. The aim of the study was to reveal the relationship between demographic factors and researchers’ roles in higher education. Data were collected by performing a questioning survey and using a validated questionnaire with 116 statements in total. The sample consisted of 304 researchers working in higher education institutions. For data analysis, Cronbach’s alpha, Mean and ANOVA calculations were used. The research findings reported that the female-researchers’ evaluations were higher in all cases regarding their roles in higher education schools. The results of the study highlighted that the male-researchers were devoted to the roles of academic citizens and mentors, while they did not refer the interest for academic freedom and the role of a knowledge producer. Findings revealed that the role of an academic citizen is perceived equally to other roles, despite the fact that researchers work in different research fields. In this research study, the highest estimates were given to the roles by the researchers representing medical sciences. Results showed that the lowest estimates for the diverse roles in higher education were provided by the researchers from engineering sciences. A correlation analysis between distinguished minor roles descriptions revealed that the participation of scientists in society debates and public policy correlates with all the remaining roles of scientists very weakly or weakly. The strongest correlation with all roles refers to academic duty, critic, personal development, and acting in one research field. In conclusion, intellectual leadership is the scope of challenging processes regarding developing, designing, creating, defining, ensuring, critiquing, teaching, instructing, researching, mentoring, enabling questioning, generating, envisioning, advocating, encouraging, re-imagining, managing, representing, counseling, achieving, evaluating, acting, and providing. The general components here refer to ideas, values, understandings, solutions, beliefs, visions, knowledge, approaches, purposes, and actions. By concluding the study, it is worth to accentuate that the demographic factors that are meaningful in studying the researchers’ roles within the intellectual leadership in higher education are the following - gender and research areas. The work experience in higher education and the year of Ph.D. defence are not the factors, which are meaningfully related to the role performance, academic duty and academic freedom of the researcher as an intellectual leader in higher education.

Open access

Jana Goriup, Jadranka Stričević and Vida Sruk

. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Safe Patient Handling and Movement (SPHM). Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Retrieved from https://www.cdc.gov/niosh/topics/safepatient/ Choobineh, A., Movahed, M., Tabatabaie, S. H., & Kumashiro, M. (2010). Perceived demands and musculoskeletal disorders in operating room nurses of Shiraz city hospitals. Industrial Health, 48(1), 74-84. Coleman, J. J. (1992). All Seriousness aside: The laughing - learning connections. International Journal of Instructional Media, 19(3), 269

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John Agwaya Aomo, Peter J.O. Aloka, Pamela A. Raburu and Peter O. Ogolla

. University: Journal of Psychiatry and Psychology; vol. 1, issue 1 , 256-266. Sava, K. (2011). Bullying effects on self-esteem, perceived stress and role of Communication with the mother . Utrecht University – Master Kinder-en Jeugdpsychologie. Rapelang C., Tihabano, K, vista, C. Pheko, M. Losoke, N. Sethunya, M. Mpeta, K & Balagun, K. (2013). Self-efficacy, self-esteem and intention to practice safe sex among Botswana Adolescents: 10SR. Journal of Humanities and social science (10SR-JHSS) Vol.9, Issue 2 (Mar-april.2013), PP.87-95. Rawson, E

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Shideh Shakouri Asl and Azadeh Lak

-Sideris, Anastasia., Robin Liggett and Hiroyuki Iseki. (2002). The geography of transit crime: Documentation and Evaluation of Crime Incidence on and around the Green Line Stations in Los Angeles.Planning Education and Research, 2, 135-151. McCord, Eric S, Jerry H. Ratcliffe, R. Marie Garcia and Ralph B. Taylor. (2007). Nonresidential crime attractors and generators elevate perceived neighborhood crime and incivilities. Research in Crime, 3, 95-320. Merry, Sally. E. (1981). Defensible space undefended: social factors in crime control. Urban Affairs

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Asaad Ali Karam

–job performance relationship: A qualitative and quantitative review. Katcher, S., & Snyder, T. (2003). Organisational commitment. USA: Atomic Dog , 90. Kiani, F., Samavtyan, H., Poorabdiyan, S., & Jafari, E. (2012). How safety trainings decrease perceived job stress: the effects of improvement in employees attitude toward safety issues. Far East Journal of Psychology and Business, 6 (4), 46-58. Krietner, S. (1995). The Good Manager’s Guide 1st edition Synene Publishers. McGhee Et Al (1996). Nature of Learning 1st edition McGraw-Hill Book Company., Boston

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Juliana Carvalho de Sousa, Franscisco Roberto Pinto, José Carlos de Lacerda Leite, Antônio de Pádua Araújo, Pablo Marlon Medeiros da Silva and Ahiram Brunni Cartaxo de Castro

3, Nº1, 2010, 3, 73-80. Fernet, C., Guay, F., Senécal, C., & Austin, S. (2012). Predicting intraindividual changes in teacher burnout: The role of perceived school environment and motivational factors. Teaching and Teacher Education , 28(4), 514-525. D.O.I: 10.1016/j.tate.2011.11.013. Garcia, L. P., & Benevides-Pereira, A. M. T. (2003). Investigando o burnout em professores universitários. InterAção Psy , 1(1), 76-89. García G. M., & CALVO J. C. A. (2011) Emotional exhaustion of nursing staff: influence of emotional annoyance and resilience

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Tengku Aizan Hamid, Sumara Masood Ul Hassan, Sharifah Azizah Haron and Rahimah Ibrahim

References Augusto-Landa, J. M., Pulido-Martos, M., & Lopez-Zafra, E. (2011). Does perceived emotional intelligence and optimism/pessimism predict psychological well-being? Journal of Happiness Studies, 12, 463-474. Baltes, P. B., & Baltes, M. M. (1990). Psychological perspectives on successful aging: The model of selective optimization with compensation. Successful aging: Perspectives from the behavioral sciences, 1(1), 1-34. Banjare, P., Dwivedi, R., & Pradhan, J. (2015). Factors associated with the life

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Paul Alhassan Issahaku

they real or stereotyping? College Student Journal, 45(3), 633-647 Ministry of Education (2003). Education strategic plan 2003 to 2015, Volume 1: policies, targets and strategies. Accra: Government of Ghana. Pettit, M. L., & DeBarr, K. A. (2011). Perceived stress, energy drink consumption, and academic performance among college students. Journal of American College Health, 59(5), 335-341 Poku, J., Aawaar, G. M., & Worae, T. A. (2013). Educational sector reforms in Ghana: a review. Global Research Journal of Education, 3