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Linda Shockey and Małgorzata E. Ćavar

Abstract

Our previous research on perception of gated casual English by university students suggests that ceteris paribus, Polish students are much more accurate than Greeks. A recent pilot study of casually-spoken Polish leads us to the conclusion that many shortcuts found in English are also common in Polish, so that similar perceptual strategies can be used in both languages, though differing in detail. Based on these preliminary results, it seems likely that perceptual strategies across languages tend towards the “eagle” approach - where a birds-eye view of the acoustic terrain without too much emphasis on detail is found - or the “roadrunner” approach, where phonetic detail is followed closely. In the former case, perceivers adjust easily to alternation caused by casual speech phonology while in the latter, perceivers expect little variation and possibly even find it confusing. Native speakers of Greek are “roadrunners”, since there is little phonological reduction in their language there is little difference, for example, between stressed and unstressed syllables. We suggest that native speakers of Polish join English speakers as “eagles”, which gives them a natural perceptual advantage in English. There is a conceptual similarity between this idea and that of the stress- or syllable-timed language, and we hypothesise that as in this case, there is a cline rather than a sharp division between eagles and roadrunners. As usual, more research is called for.

Open access

Celine Horgues

, Cambridge : Cambridge University Press Dupoux, E. and S. Peperkamp, S. 2002. A typology of Stress ‘Deafness’, in C. Gussenhoven and N. Warner (eds.), Laboratory Phonology 7 , Berlin: Mouton de Gruyter, 203-240. Dupoux, E. ; Pallier, C. ; Mehler, J. ; Sebastian, N. (2003b) A Destressing ‘Deafness’ in French ?, Journal of Memory and Language , 36, p. 406-421. Delattre, P. 1965. Comparing the Phonetic Features of English, French, German and Spanish: an Interim Report, Heidelberg : Julius Groos. Field, J

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Pilar Avello, Joan Carles Mora and Carmen Pérez-Vidal

References Avello, P., Lara, A.R., Mora, J.C., and Pérez-Vida, C. In press: The impact of Study Abroad and Length of Stay on Phonological Development in Speech Production. Proceedings of the 30th Aesla Conference , Universitat de Lleida. Avello, P. 2011: Measuring Perceived Pronunciation Gains in Study Abroad: Methodological Issues. Paper presented at the 29th Aesla Conference , Universidad de Salamanca. Barron, A. 2006: Learning to Say 'You' in German: The Acquisition of Sociolinguistic Competence in a Study

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Jan Volín, Kristýna Poesová and Radek Skarnitzl

Abstract

The perennial question as to how perceived otherness in speech projects into listener assessment of one’s personality has been systematically investigated within the field of foreign accentedness, vocal communication of affective states and vocal stereotyping. In the present study, we aimed at exploring non-native listeners’ capacity to respond to differences in natural and modified native speech, particularly whether the manipulation of temporal structure in both stressed and unstressed syllables gives rise to any changes in the perception of the speaker’s personality. The respondents’ intuitive judgements were captured in the domain of the ‘nervousness category’ taken from the five-factor model of personality. Our results indicate an effect of temporal modifications on the listeners’ judgements. Analysis of variance for repeated measures confirmed a highly significant shift of personality evaluations towards the undesired traits (e.g., nervousness, anxiety, querulousness). Several interesting interactions with the semantic contents of the utterances and with the intrinsic qualities of the speakers’ voices were also found. We argue that the effects of accented speech go beyond conscious willingness to accept “otherness” and suggest a method for studying them.

Open access

Łukasz Stolarski

perceptual and acoustic analyses. In V. Lawrence & B. Weinberg (Eds.), Transcript of the Eighth Symposium: Care of the Professional Voice (Part I) . New York: The Voice Foundation. Cosmides, L. (1983). Invariances in the acoustic expression of emotion during speech. Journal of Experimental Psychology: Human Perception and Performance, 9 , 864-881. Cummings, K. E., & Clements, M. A. (1995). Analysis of the glottal excitation of emotionally styled and stressed speech. Journal of the Acoustical Society of America, 98 , 88–98. Darwin, C. (1872). The

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Lahoucine Aammari

Abstract

Arthur Leared’s Morocco and the Moors (1876) and Budgett Meakin’s Life in Morocco and Glimpses Beyond (1905) are two less-examined imperial travel texts on precolonial Morocco. These two travelogues are British (Irish and English, respectively) – a fact that casts on them from the beginning the special taste of this genre which is a British specialty par excellence. Coming from the same political and cultural backdrops, Leared and Meakin peregrinated into Morocco in a precolonial time when it was still perceived as the “Lands of the Moors”. These two travellers responded to moments of interactions with the Moors as a culturally, socially and religiously different other. Both these Victorian travellers were aware of the fact of empire as their travelogues function as fodder to energize the discursive grandiloquence of empire. They stress an ethnocentric view in depicting Moroccans and their culture, and they communicate their observations through an interpretative framework, or in Foucauldian terminology, through the “discourses” provided by their culture. This paper undertakes the examination of these two travellers’ perception of otherness; the approach is to question and bring to the fore the rhetorical and discursive strategies as well as modes of representation Leared and Meakin deploy in their encounters with the Moors in Pre-Protectorate Morocco.