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Adrian Stoia

Abstract

This work sets out to list and describe the liturgical vestments present in panel and mural paintings of churches located in southern Transylvania. The surviving body of such vestments on display in the ”Brukenthal” National Museum of Sibiu and that of the Black Church of Brașov not only confirms their use in religious services, but also the fact that they served as models for Transylvanian ecclesiastical painting. Of Western derivation, this type of vestment reflects a way of thinking and stands testament to social status or to the different hierarchies within the church. It is, at the same time, an indication of the development of this kind of craft, produced by specialized workshops.

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Wim Janse

Calvin's Doctrine of the Lord's Supper

In order to pinpoint its proprium, it is necessary to understand John Calvin’s Eucharistic theology within the wider context of the intra-Protestant debates of his time. As a second- generation Reformer, Calvin developed his ideas explicitly in reaction to and as a middle way between the Lutheran and Swiss Reformed discussions of the 1520’s. To that end this essay first focuses on the main developments from the Middle Ages onwards, and then presents Calvin from the perspective of the positions taken up by some of his contemporaries, in particular Philipp Melanchthon. Next, some representative texts written by Calvin himself are analysed. Although Calvin’s Eucharistic views were not from the beginning a coherent and unified doctrine but developed only gradually, they may be described in a systematic-synthetic way. With respect to the matter of closed, open, and frequent communion, it is observed that for Calvin a regular celebration is essential to the deepening of the believer’s union with Christ.

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Konstantin Nikolakopoulos

Abstract

Different churches have developed over time several concepts of exegesis of the New Testament. From the very first apostolic years, the Orthodox East embraced the delivered interpretation of the Fathers, who always respected the revealing and holy spiritual character of the Scriptures (God-centric interpretation). Prevailing since the Middle-Ages in Western Christianity, on the other hand, has been an interpretative spirit of rationalistic research of the texts which gives priority to historical facts and ignores sometimes the supernatural-revealing intervention of the divine (human-centric interpretation). As long as different understandings of the holy text can lead to divergence from the delivered dogmatic teaching, it is imperative for both sides to know and understand each other better, in order to success an effective convergence. Through the harmonic synthesis of both hermeneutical directions some exaggerations and extreme interpretations could be avoided.

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Egil Grislis

ABSTRACT

Like many writers after the Renaissance, Hooker was influenced by a number of classical and Neo-Platonic texts, especially by Cicero, Seneca, Hermes Trimegistus, and Pseudo-Dionysius. Hooker’s regular allusions to these thinkers help illuminate his own work but also his place within the broader European context and the history of ideas. This paper addresses in turn the reception of Cicero and Seneca in the early Church through the Middle Ages and Renaissance, Hooker’s use of Ciceronian and Senecan ideas, and finally Hooker’s use of Neo-Platonic texts attributed to Hermes Trismegistus and Dionysius the Areopagite. Hooker will be shown to distinguish himself as a sophisticated and learned interpreter who balances distinctive motifs such as Scripture and tradition, faith, reason, experience, and ecclesiology with a complex appeal to pagan and Christian sources and ideas.

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John D. Laing

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Patricia M. Rumsey

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Dinu Moga

Reformed Tradition. Edinburgh: The Saint Andrew Press. Macleod D (1996) God or god? Arianism, Ancient and Modern. The Evangelical Quarterly 68(2): n.p. McGrath AE (1998) Historical Theology. Oxford: Blackwell. Needham NR (2000) Part II: The Middle Ages. In 2000 years of Christ’s Power . London: Grace Publications. Niesel W (1980) The Theology of Calvin Knight H (trans). Grand Rapids, MI: Baker. Trueman CR (1998) The Claims of Truth, Owen’s Trinitarian Theology. Carlisle: Paternoster Press. Turretin F (1992) Institutes of

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Rupen Das

: William Carey Library, pp. 235-251. McGavran DA (1968) Will Uppsala Betray the Two Billion? Church Growth Bulletin 5(IV): 233-241. McKnight S (2014) Kingdom Conspiracy: Returning to the Radical Mission of the Local Church. Grand Rapids, MI: Brazos Press. McKnight S (2002) Turning to Jesus: The Sociology of Conversion in the Gospels. Louisville, KY: Westminster John Knox Press. Muldoon J (1997) Introduction: Conversion of Europe. In Muldoon J (ed) Varieties of Religious Conversion in the Middle Ages. Gainsville, FL: University Press of

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W. Bradford Littlejohn

, History, and Practice. Eugene, OR: Pickwick Publications, pp. 52-66. Kirby, WJT (2011b) From ‘Generall Meditations’ to ‘Particular Decisions’: The Augustinian Coherence of Richard Hooker’s Political Theology. In Sturges, RS (ed) Law and Sovereignty in the Middle Ages and the Renaissance. Turnhout: Brepols, pp. 41-63. Lake, P (1988) Anglicans and Puritans? Presbyterianism and English Conformist Thought From Whitgift to Hooker. London: Unwin Hyman. Lake, P (2001) Business as Usual? The Immediate Reception of Hooker

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Petr Polehla

References M. VON ALBRECHT: Geschichte der römischen Literatur , DTV München 1997, 2nd ed. p. 644 E. R. CURTIUS: Europäische Literatur und Lateinisches Mittelalter , Tübingen/Basel, 1993 (11th ed.) R. A. DWYER: Ovid in the Middle Ages http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~aranar/ovid.htm S. GARTH, J. DRYDEN: Methamorphoses by Ovid , the English translation http://classics.mit.edu/Ovid/metam.8.eighth.html I