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Picturing two modernities

Ecological modernisation and the media imagery of climate change

Jarkko Kangas

References Anderson, A. (1997). Media, culture and the environment. London: UCL Press. Ball, V. K. (1965). The aesthetics of colour: A review of fifty years of experimentation. The Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism, 23(4): 441-452. Barthes, R. (1987). The photographic message. In S. Heath (ed.), Image, music, text: Essays (pp. 15-31). London: Fontana Press. Beckham Hooff, S., Botetzagias, I. & Kizos, A. (2017). Seeing the wind (farm): Applying q-methodology to understand the public

Open access

Ilmari Hiltunen

, the journalistic field and autonomy in 18 countries. The International Communication Gazette, 73(6): 477-494. Hemánus, P. (1983). Journalistinen vapaus [Journalistic freedom]. Helsinki: Gaudeamus. Jann, B. & Hinz, T. (2016). Research question and design for survey research. In C. Wolf, D. Joye, T. Smith & Y-C. Fu (eds.), The SAGE handbook of survey methodology (pp. 105-121). London: Sage. Kantola, A. & Lounasmeri, L. (2014). Viestinnän ammattilaiset promootioyhteiskunnassa: aktivisteja ja ajatusjohtajia [Communication

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Valentina Favrin, Elisabetta Gola and Emiliano Ilardi

Abstract

Nowadays, at the time of convergence culture, social network, and transmedia storytelling – when social interactions are constantly remediated – e-learning, especially in universities, should be conceived as a sharing educational activity. Different learning experiences should become smoother and able to fade out the closed learning environments (as software platform and classrooms (either virtual or not)). In this paper, we will show some experiences of the Communication Sciences degree program of the University of Cagliari, which is supplied through an e-learning method. In the ten years since its foundation, the approach has evolved from a blended learning with two kinds of traditional activity (online activities and face-to-face lessons) to a much more dynamic learning experience. Many new actors (communication companies, local government, public-service corporations, new media and social media) – indeed – have been involved in educational and teaching process. But also these processes changed: collaborative working, new media comprehension, self-guided problem solving are examples of the new literacies and approaches that can be reached as new learning objectives.

Open access

Adrian Papajani

, 2010. Repoussi, M and Tutiaux-Guillon, N (2009). “ New Trends in History Textbook Research: Issues and Methodologies toward a School Historiography” Journal of Educational Media, Memory, and Society (2), 1 Spring 2010, ISSN 2041-6938 (Print), ISSN 2041-6946 (Online) Scissler, H. (1989-1990) “ Limitations and Priorities for International Social Studies Textbook Research” International Journal of Social Studies (4) Stradling, R. (2001). Teaching 20th-Century European History: UNESCO Guide Tarasov D.A., Sergeev A.P., Filimonova V.V. Legibility

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Anthony Potts, Nina Maadad and Marizon Yu

Press. Mitrofan, O., Paul, M. & Spencer, N. (2009). Is aggression in children with behavioural and emotional difficulties associated with television viewing and video game playing? a systematic review. Child: Care, Health & Development , 35(1), 5-15. Morrison, M. (2012).Understanding methodology. In A.R. Briggs, M. Coleman & M. Morrison (Eds), Research Methods in Educational Leadership and Management . CA: Sage Publications. Olchondra, R.T. (2012). Children influence buying patterns, poll says. Retrieved from http://business.inquirer.net/61337

Open access

Paula Rautionaho, Sandra C. Deshors and Lea Meriläinen

the interplay of emancipation and globalization of ESL varieties . Amsterdam/Philadelphia: John Benjamins. Laitinen, Mikko and Magnus Levin. 2016. On the globalization of English: Observations of subjective progressives in present-day Englishes. In E. Seoane and C. Suárez-Gómez (eds.). World Englishes: New theoretical and methodological considerations , 229–252. Amsterdam/Philadelphia: John Benjamins. Leech, Geoffrey, Marianne Hundt, Christian Mair and Nicholas Smith. 2009. Change in contemporary English: A grammatical study. Cambridge: Cambridge

Open access

Elena Firpo

References Arthur, J., Waring, M., & Coe R.,and Hedges L.V. (2012). Research Methods and Methodologies in Education. London: Sage Pubns Ltd. Bransford, D., Brown, A. & Cocking, R. (2000). How people learn: brain, mind, experience and school. Washington D.C: National Academic Press. Bonaiuti, G. & Calvani, A. (2007). Fondamenti di Didattica. Teoria e Prassi dei dispositivi formativi. Roma: Carocci. Coonan, C. M. (2014). I principi base del CLIL. In Paolo Balboni (Ed.). Fare CLIL. I quaderni della

Open access

Giorgos K. Fountzoulas, Maria I. Koutsouba and Evgenia Nikolaki

literacy, really? Quest, 67 (4), 367-383. Katsouli, I. (2012). Distance learning and critical literacy: an example of literary text. Dissertation. Patra: H.O.U. Katsouli, I. & Koutsouba, M. (2013). Politics and education, education and politics: The “conversation” between critical literacy and open and distance learning. In Proceedings from the 7 th Conference for the Open & Distance Learning “Learning Methodologies” (pp. 59-69). Athens: Hellenic Network of Open and Distance Learning Publications. Kentel, J.A., & Dobson, T. (2007). Beyond myopic

Open access

Giampaolo Chiappini

Abstract

This article provides a methodology with two potential applications: to prove useful to maths teachers for analysing and evaluating the educational potential of different digital artefacts and to help designers of maths learning artefacts to evaluate their design during the implementation phase. The educational potential of an artefact is considered as an entity determined by actions and representations structure available within the artefact, the interpretation and behaviour of who uses it and the features of the activity in which it is used. The proposed methodology is based on the notions of affordance, narrative and cycle of expansive learning. The methodology has been applied on AlNuSet, a system designed for supporting the teaching and learning of algebra by means of modalities of interaction that are of visual, spatial and motor nature.