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Adrian Duşa and Valeriu Frunzaru

Abstract

For about eight decades, research instruments in the social sciences have been orbiting around Likert’s proposal for his famous response scale. Before him, and also after he managed to impose it, many researchers have tried to find a better solution. This, however, has proven difficult. While solving methodological problems for measuring concepts, by concentrating all the responses in only five categories brings major disadvantages as well: it has extremely low variation, it does not produce metric scores unless combined with similar items, and it cannot be used as such for advanced statistical analysis. In this article, we propose using a continuous response scale as a solution to each of these problems. In our opinion, the possible application of this solution has an extremely high potential to advance social science research methodology.

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Cristina Raţ, Andrada Tobias and Valér Veres

marginalization of Roma communities in Romania]. Cluj-Napoca: Editura Fundației pentru Studii Europene. United Nations Development Programme/World Bank/European Commission – Fundamental Rights Agency (2011): The Situation of the Roma in 11 Member States , http://fra.europa.eu/sites/default/files/fra_uploads/2099-FRA-2012-Roma-at-a-glance_EN.pdf (20.12.2015). United Nations Development Programme – UNDP (2013): Integrated Household Surveys among Roma Populations. Roma Inclusion Working Papers, UNDP, http://www.eurasia.undp.org/content/rbec/en/home/library/roma/roma-household-survey-methodology

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Davide Filippi

Abstract

This article addresses the process of political organization and unionizing among university researchers in Italy which are formally considered to be ‘in training’. This condition puts them in a sort of liminal space, between being recognized as fully employed professionals and being instead considered lifetime students. Their effort to organize politically can be seen as one of many ways through which students are fighting against the establishment of the neoliberal university model. The analysis is focused on the Italian movement called CRNS - Coordinamento dei Ricercatori non Strutturati (Non-structured Research Fellows Coordination), which formed to address this defining issue. The CRNS experiment aimed at achieving a sense of unity among the fragmented academic workforce and it can be considered a prototype of a new, grassroots form of union activity and organizing. The empirical data used in the analysis consists of ten in-depth interviews with university researchers, all Italian citizens, equally divided between men and women, who have all had to move around, as a function of their career and who have all been involved, to different degrees, in political and union organizing initiatives, regarding their conditions of ‘perpetual students’ rather than ‘not quite employed’.

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Başak Bilecen

References Amelina, Anna and Thomas Faist. 2012. “De-Naturalizing the National in Research Methodologies: Key Concepts of Transnational Studies in Migration.” Ethnic and Racial Studies 35 (10): 1–18. Baldassar, Loretta and Laura Merla, eds. 2014. Transnational Families, Migration and the Circulation of Care: Understanding Mobility and Absence in Family Life. London: Routledge. Baldassar, Loretta, Cora V. Baldock, and Raelene Wilding. 2007. Families Caring Across Borders: Migration, Ageing and Transnational Caregiving . Houndmills: Palgrave

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Cornelia Reyes

(2): 145-162. Molina, José Luis, Isidro Maya-Jariego, and Christopher McCarty. 2014. “Giving Meaning to Social Networks: Methodology for Conducting and Analyzing Interviews Based on Personal Network Visualizations.” Pp. 305-335 in Mixed Methods in Social Networks Research, edited by S. Dominguez and B. Hollstein. Cambridge University Press. Moreno, Jacob Levy. 1934. “Who shall survive.” Vol. 58. Washington, 1934. Padgett, John F. and Christopher K. Ansell. 1993. “Robust Action and the Rise of the Medici, 1400-1434.” American journal of sociology: 1259

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András Vigvári and Tamás Gerőcs

, A. (2018). Debt-Ridden Development on Europe’s Eastern Periphery. In Manuela Boatcă; Andrea Komlosy; Hans-Heinrich Nolte (eds.). Global Inequalities in World Systems Perspective. Theoretical Debates and Methodological Innovations. Routledge. Forthcoming. Gunst, P. (1987). A paraszti társadalom Magyarországon a két világháború között. MTA Történetudományi Intézet, Budapest. Kövér, Gy. (2004). Inactive Transformation: Social History of Hungary from the Reform Era to World War I. In Social history of Hungary from the Reform Era to the

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Maria Manuela Mendes, Olga Magano and Pedro Candeias

and Slovak Republics: Development of a social survey methodology. Oslo: Fafo. Blanes, Rui L. (2006). Aleluia. Música e identidade num movimento Evangélico cigano na Península Ibérica . Lisboa: Instituto de Ciências Sociais. Branco, F. (2003). Os ciganos e o RMG: direitos sociais e direito à diferença. Intervenção Social, 27: 119-139. Brazzabeni, M. (2012). De bairro em bairro: uma família cigana em Vila Real de Santo António entre discriminação burocrática e social e possíveis formas de vida. In José Gabriel Pereira Bastos (ed.): Portugueses

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Cristian Păun

Abstract

European Funds are considered to be o reliable solution for emerging economies from Eastern Europe. These funds are granted by European Union to reduce the gap between countries and to ensure a harmonized development at the level of this group of countries that decided to act together as a united economic entity. In fact, European Funds are previously obtained from taxes applied to all European citizens and redistributed by European Institutions in accordance with predefined principles and rules. The redistributive effect is always present in such situation and has clear impact on economies that are net paying for these funds and on economies that are net benefiting from them. This paper presents the results of a quantitative analysis at the level of ten Eastern European Countries (EEC countries) on the social and economic impact of these funds based on panel regression methodology.