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Adrian Duşa and Valeriu Frunzaru

Abstract

For about eight decades, research instruments in the social sciences have been orbiting around Likert’s proposal for his famous response scale. Before him, and also after he managed to impose it, many researchers have tried to find a better solution. This, however, has proven difficult. While solving methodological problems for measuring concepts, by concentrating all the responses in only five categories brings major disadvantages as well: it has extremely low variation, it does not produce metric scores unless combined with similar items, and it cannot be used as such for advanced statistical analysis. In this article, we propose using a continuous response scale as a solution to each of these problems. In our opinion, the possible application of this solution has an extremely high potential to advance social science research methodology.

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Pietro Cipresso, Brenda K. Wiederhold and Giuseppe Riva

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Swiss Journal of Sociology

Revue Suisse de sociologie/ Schweizerische Zeitschrift für Soziologie

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Davide Filippi

Abstract

This article addresses the process of political organization and unionizing among university researchers in Italy which are formally considered to be ‘in training’. This condition puts them in a sort of liminal space, between being recognized as fully employed professionals and being instead considered lifetime students. Their effort to organize politically can be seen as one of many ways through which students are fighting against the establishment of the neoliberal university model. The analysis is focused on the Italian movement called CRNS - Coordinamento dei Ricercatori non Strutturati (Non-structured Research Fellows Coordination), which formed to address this defining issue. The CRNS experiment aimed at achieving a sense of unity among the fragmented academic workforce and it can be considered a prototype of a new, grassroots form of union activity and organizing. The empirical data used in the analysis consists of ten in-depth interviews with university researchers, all Italian citizens, equally divided between men and women, who have all had to move around, as a function of their career and who have all been involved, to different degrees, in political and union organizing initiatives, regarding their conditions of ‘perpetual students’ rather than ‘not quite employed’.

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Matteo Antonini

Measurement of Neighborhood Social Processes. Sociological Methodology 39(1): 151–183. Schuler, Martin, Pierre Dessemontet, and Dominique Joye. 2005. Les niveaux géographiques de la Suisse . Neuchâtel: FSO. Sheldon, George. 2013. Unemployment Persistence, Duration Dependence, and Long-Term Unemployment: A Markov Perspective . Basel: University of Basel. Stiglitz, Joseph E., Amartya Sen, and Jean-Paul Fitoussi. 2010. Mismeasuring Our Lives: Why GDP Doesn’t Add Up . New York: New Press. Studer, Matthias (2013). WeightedCluster Library Manual: A

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Başak Bilecen

References Amelina, Anna and Thomas Faist. 2012. “De-Naturalizing the National in Research Methodologies: Key Concepts of Transnational Studies in Migration.” Ethnic and Racial Studies 35 (10): 1–18. Baldassar, Loretta and Laura Merla, eds. 2014. Transnational Families, Migration and the Circulation of Care: Understanding Mobility and Absence in Family Life. London: Routledge. Baldassar, Loretta, Cora V. Baldock, and Raelene Wilding. 2007. Families Caring Across Borders: Migration, Ageing and Transnational Caregiving . Houndmills: Palgrave

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Cornelia Reyes

(2): 145-162. Molina, José Luis, Isidro Maya-Jariego, and Christopher McCarty. 2014. “Giving Meaning to Social Networks: Methodology for Conducting and Analyzing Interviews Based on Personal Network Visualizations.” Pp. 305-335 in Mixed Methods in Social Networks Research, edited by S. Dominguez and B. Hollstein. Cambridge University Press. Moreno, Jacob Levy. 1934. “Who shall survive.” Vol. 58. Washington, 1934. Padgett, John F. and Christopher K. Ansell. 1993. “Robust Action and the Rise of the Medici, 1400-1434.” American journal of sociology: 1259

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Ionela Vlase

Abstract:

The article addresses the largely debated linkages between gender and migration, on the one hand, and the impact of migration on migrants’ society of origin, on the other hand. Based on multi-sited research conducted in a village from Eastern Romania and in Rome (the main destination of the population studied), this paper highlights gender differences in the participation to migration process and in the contribution of migrants to the socio-economic development of their society. Using a qualitative methodology based on semi-structured interviews with migrants and participant observations, the research reveals different meanings that migrants (women and men) invest in their actions (i.e. transfers of ideas, money or durable goods and set-up of small local businesses). This study contributes to the understanding of the gendered contribution of migrants to the economic and socio-cultural transformations of their society of origin.