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Open access

Maria Bermudez Lopez

Abstract

Postoperative shivering is a common complication of anaesthesia. Shivering is believed to increase oxygen consumption, increase the risk of hypoxemia, induce lactic acidosis, and catecholamine release. Therefore, it might increase the postoperative complications especially in high-risk patients. Moreover, shivering is one of the leading causes of discomfort for postsurgical patients. Shivering is usually triggered by hypothermia. However, it occurs even in normothermic patients during the perioperative period. The aetiology of shivering has been understood insufficiently. Another potential mechanism is pain and acute opioid withdrawal (especially with the use of short-acting narcotics). Besides that shivering is poorly understood, the gold standard for the treatment and prevention has not been defined yet. Perioperative hypothermia prevention is the first method to avoid shivering. Many therapeutic strategies for treating shivering exist and most are empiric. Unfortunately, the overall quality of the antishivering guidelines is low. Two main strategies are available: pharmacological and non-pharmacological antishivering methods. The combination of forced-air warming devices and intravenous meperidine is the most validated method. We also analysed different medications but final conclusion about the optimal antishivering medication is difficult to be drawn due to the lack of high-quality evidence. Nevertheless, control of PS is possible and clinically effective with simple pharmacological interventions combined with non pharmacological methods. However, to be consistent with the most up-to-date, evidence-based practice, future antishivering treatment protocols should optimize methodological rigor and transparency.

Open access

Hana Locihová and Katarína Žiaková

Abstract

Aim: To examine the effects of mechanical ventilation on the quality of sleep in patients in the intensive care unit (ICU) using recent and relevant literature. Methods: To verify the examined objective, the results of the analysis of available original scientific works have been used including defined inclusion/exclusion criteria and search strategy. Appropriate works found were analysed further. The applied methodology was in line with the general principles of Evidence- Based Medicine. The following literary databases were used: CINAHL, Medline and gray literature: Google Scholar. Results: A total of 91 trials were found. Eleven of these relevant to the follow-up analysis were selected: all trials were carried out under real ICU conditions and the total of 192 patients were included in the review. There is an agreement within all trials that sleep in patients requiring mechanical ventilation is disturbed. Most reviewed trials have shown that mechanical ventilation is probably not the main factor causing sleep disturbances, but an appropriate ventilation strategy can significantly help to improve its quality by reducing the frequency of the patient-ventilator asynchrony. Conclusion: Based on the analysis, it appears that an appropriate ventilation mode setting can have a beneficial effect on the quality of sleep in ICU patients.

Open access

Sanda-Maria Copotoiu and Ruxandra Copotoiu

Care. 2015;19:445. 5. Angus DC, van der Poll T. Severe sepsis and septic shock. N Engl J Med. 2013: 840-51. 6. Angus DC, Barnato AE, Bell D, Bellomo R, Choong C-R, Coats TJ et al. A systematic review and meta-analysis of early goal-directed therapy for septic shock: the Arise, ProCESS and ProMISe Investigators. Intensive Care Med. 2015;41:1549-60. 7. *** The ProCESS/ARISE/ProMISe Methodology Writing Committee. Harmonizing international trials of early goal-directed resuscitation for severe sepsis and septic shock: methodology of ProCESS, ARISE, and

Open access

Dana Tomescu, Mihai Popescu and Alexander Vitin

, White NJ, Aramă SS, Tomescu DR. Effects of malignancy on blood coagulation in septic intensive care patients. Blood Coagul Fibrinolysis. 2018;29:92-6. 14. Solomon C, Rannuci M, Hochleitner G, Schochl H, Schlimp C. Assessing the Methodology for Calculating Platelet Contribution to Clot Strength (Platelet Component) in Thromboelastometry and Thrombelastography. Anesth Analg. 2015; 121:868–78. 15. Smart L, Mumtaz K, Scharpf D, et al. Rotational Thromboelastometry or Conventional Coagulation Tests in Liver Transplantation: Comparing Blood Loss, Transfusions

Open access

Andrea Zanichelli, Marta Mansi, Maddalena A. Wu, Giulia Azin and Marco Cicardi

, Cugno M, Cicardi M. Bradykinin-mediated angiooedema. N Engl J Med. 2002;347(8):621-2. 15. Bygum AM, Aygoren-Pursun EM, Caballero TMP et al. The hereditary angiooedema burden of illness study in Europe (HAEBOIS- Europe): background and methodology. BMC Dermatol. 2012;12:4. 16. Wilson DA, Bork K, Shea EP, Rentz AM, Blaustein MB, Pullman WE. Economic costs associated with acute attacks and longterm management of hereditary angiooedema. Ann Allergy Asthma Immunol. 2010;104(4):314-20. 17. Lumry WR, Castaldo AJ, Vernon MK

Open access

Ario Santini, Leonard Azamfirei and Cosmin Moldovan

medical journals. Authors, inexperienced or otherwise, have a professional and ethical duty to undertake high-quality research based on sound clinical or laboratory methodology and submit significant and quality manuscripts for publication. Their responsibilities commence long before the writing, submission and eventual publication of a study paper, originating in the planning and execution of the study on which papers will be based. Sound clinical or laboratory methodology should be predicated on a thorough acquisition of knowledge and finishing with complex decision

Open access

Péter Palágyi, Sándor Barna, Péter Csábi, Péter Lorencz, Ildikó László and Zsolt Molnár

;4:269-81. 15. Kolkman JJ, Bargeman M, Huisman AB, Geelkerken RH. Diagnosis and management of splanchnic ischemia. World J Gastroenterol. 2008;28;14:7309-20. 16. Kolkman JJ, Otte JA, Groeneveld AB. Gastrointestinal luminal PCO2 tonometry: an update on physiology, methodology and clinical applications. Br J Anaesth. 2000;84:74-86. 17. Dubin A, Edul VS, Pozo MO, et al. Persistent villi hypoperfusion explains intramucosal acidosis in sheep endotoxemia. Crit Care Med. 2008; 36:535-42. 18. Knichwitz G, Rötker J, Möllhoff T, Richter

Open access

Gabriel Alexandru Popescu, Tivadar Bara and Paul Rad

. 2007;139:280–5. 25. Fusco MA, Martin RS, Chang MC. Estimation of intra-abdominal pressure by bladder pressure measurement: validity and methodology. J Trauma. 2001;50(2):297-302. 26. Mureșan M, Bara T, Bancu Ș, et al. Model de reconstrucție tension free a peretelui abdominal în defecte parietale gigante prin monitorizarea intraoperatorie a presiunii intraabdominale. Prezentare de caz. Jurnalul de Chirurgie 2012;8(3):297-302. 27. De Waele J, Pletinckx P, Blot S, Hoste E. Saline volume in transvesical intra-abdominal pressure measurement: enough is

Open access

Costas Psarros, Evangelos K. Economou, Michael Koutsilieris and Charalambos Antoniades

References 1. Lee R, Margaritis M, Channon KM, et al. Evaluating oxidative stress in human cardiovascular disease: methodological aspects and considerations. Curr Med Chem. 2012;19:2504-20. 2. Tousoulis D, Psarros C, Demosthenous M, et al. Innate and adaptive inflammation as a therapeutic target in vascular disease: the emerging role of statins. J Am Coll Cardiol. 2014;63:2491-502. 3. Psarros C, Lee R, Margaritis M, et al. Nanomedicine for the prevention, treatment and imaging of atherosclerosis. Nanomedicine

Open access

Zoltán Ruszkai, Erika Kiss and Zsolt Molnár

complied with the survey-reporting list. After the questionnaire was considered appropriate, Hungarian anaesthesiologists were invited by email and by a newsletter, to participate in an online survey between January 1st to March 31 st , 2018, using the public e-mail database of the Hungarian Hospital Federation (Magyar Kórházszövetség). A cover letter containing the investigators’ names and contact details, the objectives, aims and methodology of the study was attached. The online questionnaire was published using Google Forms (Google Inc., Mountain View, CA