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Sigrid Norris

vegetarianism: Identity in everyday life of Thai non-traditional religious cult members. (PhD thesis, Auckland University of Technology.) Makboon B. 2015 Spiritual vegetarianism: Identity in everyday life of Thai non-traditional religious cult members PhD thesis Auckland University of Technology Norris, S. 2004. Analyzing multimodal interaction: A methodological framework . London: Routledge. Norris S. 2004 Analyzing multimodal interaction: A methodological framework London Routledge Norris, S. 2006. “Multiparty interaction: A

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Wolfgang U. Dressler

Abstract

The paper discusses several methodological problems in the necessary (mostly metaphorical) transfer of concepts from one discipline (or subdiscipline) into another one, especially when interdisciplinary research demands mutual understanding in terms of translation and correspondence of concepts. After differentiating between multidisciplinarity, interdisciplinarity and transdisciplinarity, the first is rejected and it is pleaded that the second and third should be combined. Several adequate and inadequate transfers of concepts into linguistics are dealt with, especially in the areas of morphology and language acquisition. Successful transfer is characterised by the formal transfer of new terms and their easy adaptation to already existing linguistic conceptions, especially between subdisciplines. Most often, further important differentiations of a concept cannot be transferred from the original discipline but must be added as enrichments within linguistics itself. This may lead to a split-up of concepts in different subdisciplines of linguistics. The concepts discussed are regression, self-organization, complexity, transparency vs. opacity, figure and ground, top-down processing, default, input, grammaticalisation.

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Crystal J. Robinson and Jeanette Altarriba

Abstract

Research on the representation of emotion in human memory has focused on the ways in which words that label an emotion (e.g., love, joy) or represent emotional components (e.g., death, butterfly) are learned, stored, and retrieved from memory. The current work reviews the ways in which these types of words have been distinguished from concrete and abstract words, the types of methodologies used to distinguish among word groups, and the ways in which these words are automatically processed in the bilingual speaker. While emotion words may be more readily processed and retrieved when they appear in the first language, other word types that are neutral with regards to arousal and valence may be processed similarly across languages. The current work also illustrates the ways in which this knowledge is important in advancing theories of language and cognition, attention, perception, and mental health. Future directions are discussed that elucidate the further applications of these interesting lines of research.

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Agata Rozumko

Abstract

The category of epistemic adverbs has recently received increased attention in both Anglophone and Polish linguistics, but English–Polish contrastive research in this area has so far been rather fragmentary. English and Polish grammars differ considerably in the ways they classify epistemic adverbs. The differences largely result from the different understanding of adverbs as a category, which in English grammar tends to be presented as broad and heterogeneous while in Polish grammar – rather narrow and uniform. Polish equivalents of English epistemic adverbs are classified as particles – a distinct word class with its own characteristic properties. This paper presents an overview of approaches to epistemic adverbs taken in Anglophone and Polish linguistics with the aim of identifying their convergent points and suggesting a framework for a contrastive analysis. In the case of Anglophone research, the focus is largely on discourse studies because epistemic adverbs are usually seen as a discourse category. In Polish linguistics, however, they are analysed within different theoretical frameworks, which is why the discussion will not be limited to one specific methodological school. Reference is also made to more general issues, such as the treatment of adverbs as a category.

Open access

Abbie Hantgan-Sonko

Abstract

This paper illustrates a methodological approach to the design of an annotated corpus using a case study of phonetic convergences and divergences by multilingual speakers in southwestern Senegal’s Casamance region. The newly compiled corpus contains approximately 183,000 annotations of multilingual, spoken data, gathered by eight researchers over a ten year span using methods ranging from structured lexical elicitation in controlled contexts to naturally occurring, multilingual conversations. The area from which the data were collected consists of three villages and their primary languages, and yet many more contribute to the linguistic landscape. Detailed metadata inform analyses of variation, the context in which a speech act took place and between whom, the speakers’ linguistic repertoires, trajectories, and social networks, as well as the larger language context. A potential path for convergence or divergence that emerged during data collection and in building and searching the corpus is the crossroads in the phonetic production of word-initial velar plosives. Word-initial [k] emerges in one language where only [ɡ] is present in the other; the third utilizes both. The corpus design makes it feasible, not only to identify areas of accommodation, but to grasp the context, enabling a sociolinguistically informed analysis of the speakers’ linguistic behavior.

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Svetlana N. Kucherenko

Abstract

This paper revisits a range of theories of power in communication and argues that there has been no methodology able to grasp the multiplicity of power in communication as a concept. As a result, the present scholarship on power in communication is characterized by a multiplicity of approaches that a) use the concept of power as a self-explanatory or vague concept in the analysis of several interactional phenomena; b) draw on a particular approach to power, disregarding multiple workings of power; or c) acknowledge the complexity of power and synthesize various approaches to power.

Open access

Zuzana Kováčová and Elena Ciprianová

Abstract

Our cognition, that is our knowledge of the world, is based on concepts. A word itself can be regarded as a multilayered concept with an anthropocentric proto-basis. Following the tradition and the methodological framework of the New Moscow School of Conceptual Analysis, we trace the implicit affinity between the concepts of seeing, knowing and believing in Slovak. In this paper, the lexical relations of inclusion between the concepts are revealed directly through the etymological study of the lexemes vidieť ‘see’, vedieť ‘know’ and veriť ‘believe’. Additionally, the identification of figurative meanings of the selected Slovak phrasemes provides indirect evidence for the assumed internal connections and for the existence of associative lingua-creative mechanisms manifested in the birth of new metaphorical meanings.

Open access

Oryslava Ivantsiv

Abstract

The article focuses on metaphorical modelling as a means of corporate image development. The research data includes an electronic corpus of 185 press releases issued by five international cosmetic companies. A methodology of analysing metaphorical models based on the consideration of the model’s frame-slot structure was applied. The study resulted in the singling out of two major metaphorical clusters within the corporate discourse of image-making – BUSINESS IS A HUMAN BEING and BUSINESS IS ART. Although these models do not embrace the whole range of sources of metaphorical expansion, they nevertheless essentially contribute to creating a relatively holistic image of a cosmetic company as a perfect organism that produces masterpieces to meet the needs and expectations of the target audience.

Open access

Oleksandr Kapranov

Abstract

This article involves a qualitative framing analysis of climate change discourse by Statoil, a Norwegian-based energy corporation, which is considered to be a major actor in the Norwegian fossil fuels market. The corpus of the present framing analysis consists of Statoil’s annual sustainability reports from 2001 until 2015 available online at the official Statoil website www.statoil.com. The framing analysis is based upon the methodological approach to framing described by Dahl (2015). The specific research aim of the present investigation is twofold: i) to identify Statoil’s framing of climate change discourse and ii) to compare how the framing changed diachronically from the time of the first sustainability report published in 2001 until the 2015 Sustainability Report. The results of the framing analysis indicate that Statoil’s climate change discourse in 2001-2015 is framed by a number of qualitatively different frames that are unequally distributed in diachrony, e.g. “Anthropogenic Cause”, “Battle”, “Corporate Responsibility”, “Emissions Reduction” etc. These frames are further presented and discussed in the article.