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Lisa Griggio

Summary

The article presents a scientific analysis of a practical application of multilingual and multicultural education at higher education, more specifically, the description of the eTandem project developed and launched by the Language Center of the University of Padua, which won the European Language Label (ELL) in December 2016. The project was selected and nominated since it provides a methodological approach and study strategies which favour multilingualism, mobility for young people and inclusiveness. The project is based on an online exchange between Italian students enrolled at the University of Padua and international students who will be coming to the University. It differs from many other telecollaboration projects in that it involves different languages, levels of language competence as well as various ways of interaction. Indeed, it implies three different ways of communication among participants: (1) one-to-one partnership in the students’ target language; (2) many-to-many interaction in Italian and/or English/French/Spanish as linguae francae on a Moodle platform and/or in a social Facebook area; (3) one-to-many multilingual interaction carried out by e-tutors in Facebook. They provide students with useful links regarding cultural events and things to do in Padua and its surroundings, as well as recent news and interesting linguistic and cultural issues related to different countries. Mobility, informality, autonomy, reciprocity, friendship, fun and multilingual community are the key words of this initiative whose objectives are aimed at developing linguistic, cultural, personal, social and digital skills in different languages, even in the less used and less taught ones.

Open access

Lilija Vilkancienė and Inga Rozgienė

Summary

The paper presents the findings of the research carried out among the participants of the project ”Development of Content and Language Integrated Learning (CLIL) in Education” (2011-2013) that aimed to upgrade the competences of subject teachers enabling them to implement content and foreign language integrated learning approach in general education and vocational training. The data obtained through a survey indicates that the project participants developed a positive attitude towards the CLIL approach and positively assess the competences acquired during the programme. European Framework for CLIL Teacher Education proves to be a useful tool when designing training courses for specific target groups of qualified content teachers and a fifty hours' programme seems to be adequate to get acquainted with the fundamentals of CLIL. The project participants were most positive about their CLIL methodology competence development during the project and ability to identify appropriate subject content for teaching by using the CLIL approach. The weakest point identified by the participants involves languagerelated issues, such as ability to support language learning in content, balancing the target language used between the learners' and teacher's linguistic ability, and overall insufficiency of linguistic competences. One more issue indicated by the respondents is the absence of standards, guidance and administrative support, as well as quality assurance (content delivery, materials and assessment) in CLIL.

Open access

Inga Savickienė, Laura Raščiauskaitė, Aušra Jankauskaitė and Loreta Alešiūnaitė

Summary

Integration into the European Union, increasing communication and cooperation between countries have brought an extensive interest in foreign languages and the need for foreign language teaching and learning has been recognized by the developers of Lithuanian education policy as an inseparable component of personal development. Teaching and learning of Romanic languages in Lithuania have been popular, exceptional, though varied. French language teaching has old traditions in both formal and non-formal education; while teaching of other Romanic languages (Spanish, Italian, Portuguese, etc.) has not been legally regulated yet – teaching traditions have not been formed, there are no specific teaching syllabi and programs, a lack of methodology and experts in didactics. However, Spanish language learning in Lithuanian secondary education schools and gymnasiums is becoming more and more popular in the recent years. In Lithuanian secondary education Spanish is taught as the second and third foreign language or as an extra-curriculum activity in non-formal education. The analysis of scientific literature revealed a lack of scientific studies and publications not only about the teaching of Spanish but also comparative studies between Lithuanian and Spanish languages. Research into Spanish language teaching and learning indicates not only the increasing number of learners, but also the increasing awareness with regard to the importance and usefulness of Spanish language competence acquisition for international encounters. However, Spanish language teachers face challenges such as insufficient number of teaching hours in general education institutions, lack of qualified Spanish language teachers, insufficient provision with teaching and learning aids and other support material, no state examinations are organized which could help to determine the learners’ Spanish language competences as well as motivate learners to learn this Romanic language.

Open access

Jūratė Matulionienė and Daiva Pundziuvienė

Summary

A considerable number of immigrants in the United Kingdom confront challenges as they acculturate into a new way of life, where language competence significantly influences their social, economic and cultural integration. Such immigrants are often at an educational and social disadvantage compared to the majority of population due to their different social and cultural backgrounds, prior educational experience and the lack of language competencies. The use of technologies for teaching / learning the host country language has been emphasized in European Strategy 2020 policy. Although learning of English usually takes place very naturally in an English-speaking informal environment, formal educational institutions in the UK and immigrants’ native countries tend to be very helpful as well. Assuming that such learners of English usually need more intensively-paced learning and knowing that professional commitments or other reasons can prevent them from coming to classes, blended learning can help them reach their goals faster and not lose connection with their native country. In order to develop insight into such English learners’ needs as well as to identify teaching forms that could help in meeting these needs, this study used a survey to explore the most important factors influencing the development of the UK immigrants’ English language competence and students’ general practice of using ICT for English learning and their attitudes towards ICT in foreign language learning. Furthermore, the research aimed to answer the question whether a blended strategy of language learning organized by their native countries institutions would be able to positively influence the learning outcomes while maintaining a connection with their native country and culture. The research sample was a group of English learners enrolled in an ESOL course. To explore the needs, experiences and attitudes of the participants, a quantitative research methodology was applied and short semi-structured interviews were conducted. The present research has demonstrated that the advancement of technologies has increased the use of ICT not only for personal purposes but also for work and studies. The students have indicated quite a frequent use of various on-line English study tools and programmes and have demonstrated a generally positive attitude towards blended English learning.

Open access

Amin Karimnia and Fatemeh Mohammad Jafari

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Anna Kizińska and Renata Botwina

. Ruch Prawniczy, Ekonomiczny i Socjologiczny , 1, 185–204. Reiss, K. & Vermeer, H. (1984). Grundlegung einer allgemeinen Translationstheorie . Tübingen: Niemeyer. Sager, J. C. (1990). A Practical Course in Terminology Processing . Amsterdam/Philadelphia: John Benjamins Publishing Company. Sarčević, S. (1997). New Approach to Legal Translation . The Hague/London/Boston: Kluwer Law International. Vinay, J.-P. & Darbelnet J., (1958/2000). A methodology for translation. In L. Venuti (Ed.), The Translation Studies Reader (pp. 84–93). London

Open access

Volkan Mutlu

). Introduction to type: A guide to understanding your results on the Myers-Briggs Type Indicator (4 th ed.). UK: Oxford Psychologists Press. Nunan, D. (1988). Syllabus design . New York: Oxford University Press. Oxford, R. L. (2002). Language learning strategies in a nutshell: Update and ESL suggestions. In J. C. Richards, &W. A. Renandya (eds.), Methodology in language teaching: An anthology of current practice (pp. 124–132). New York: Cambridge University Press. Oxford. R. L. (2003). Language learning styles and strategies: An overview. GALA , 1

Open access

Miroslav Stasilo

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Amin Karimnia and Mahmood Khosravani

when and why to use Arabic in the Saudi Arabian EFL classroom: Viewing L1 use as eclectic technique. English Language Teaching , 5(6), 78–88. Lightbown, P. M., & Spada, N. (1990). Focus-on-form and corrective feedback in communicative language teaching: Effects on second language learning. Studies in Second Language Acquisition , 12, 429–448. Long, M. H. (1991). Focus on form: A design feature in language teaching methodology. In K. de Bot, R. Ginsberg & C. Kramsch (Eds.), Foreign language research in crosscultural perspective (pp. 39–52). Amsterdam

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Roxana Taquechel-Chaigneau

Current English , 7 th ed. Oxford: Oxford University Press, R92. Seidlhofer, B. (2007). English as a lingua franca and communities of practice. In S. Volk-Birke &J. Lippert (eds.), Anglistentag 2006 Halle – Proceedings (pp. 307–318). Trier: Wissenschaftlicher Verlag Trier. Ten Haven, P. June (1990). Methodological issues in Conversation Analysis. Bulletin de Méthodologie Sociologique , 27 , 23–51. Retrieved from http://www.paultenhave.nl/mica.htm#N_1 . Traverso, V. (2012). Ad-hoc interpreting in multilingual work meetings. Who translates for whom