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Bojan Morić Milovanović, Tomislav Krišto and Stjepan Srhoj

Abstract

This paper proposes team building methodology for project managers in virtual teams as means to develop swift trust between new team members in the inception phase of the project life cycle. Proposed methodology encompasses activities within the first three days after the team formation and proposes the measuring tools for monitoring and managing trust development within the project team. Aim of this paper is to provide new insights to various decision makers potentially interested in increasing the performance of project teams operating in virtual environment, such as: investors, business owners and project managers working in virtual environment.

Open access

Helena Šlogar, Krešimir Jerin and Milan Papić

Abstract

Foreign direct investments include equity capital, reinvested earnings and debt relations between ownership-related residents and non-residents. Since 31 October 2014, the Croatian National Bank has started to publish information in the field of statistics Relations (balance of payments, foreign debt and the IIP) in accordance with the methodology prescribed by the sixth edition of the Manual on Balance of Payments (Eng. Balance of Payments and International Investment Position Manual, BPM6), thus changing the presentational form of direct investment. Direct investments are not classified according to the so-called direction of investments (Eng. directional principle) on direct investment in Croatia and direct investment abroad anymore, but according to BPM6 apply the socalled principle of assets and liabilities (Eng. Assets / Liabilities principle). The aim is to point out the differences between the standards BPM5 and BPM6 and determine which activities and which countries are the most represented in the structure of direct investments in Croatia. By identifying relevant activities and countries in the structure of foreign direct investment, relevant information is obtained about the macroeconomic state of the Republic of Croatia and about the opportunities and potential dangers that certain activities and countries provide.

Open access

European Journal of Tourism, Hospitality and Recreation

The Journal of CiTUR Centre of Tourism Research, Development and Innovation

Open access

Martina Pokupec, Diana Njerš and Hilarija Lozančić Benić

Abstract

Teaching and learning English for professional purposes largely involves the acquisition of specialised vocabulary, with teaching methodology focusing on the development of understanding and usage of specific vocabulary items. Within the wide variety of professional purposes the language is acquired for, teaching learners of tourism and hospitality also requires a focus on a range of specific language skills, mostly based on understanding of diverse types of discourse and strong communication skills in varied language situations and contexts. English for professional purposes thus becomes more specific - English for Tourism and Hospitality - signalling a slightly different approach to teaching and learning, i.e. not heavily based on acquiring vocabulary skills, but shifting focus on strong communication skills and enhancement of the four elementary language skills: reading, writing, listening and speaking.

This paper focuses on assessing and comparing receptive and productive vocabulary skills of learners of English as a Second Language (ESL), with a general hypothesis that learners with greater general language competences do not exhibit major problems in inferencing the meaning of specialised urban tourism vocabulary items.

For this purpose, we selected 10 vocabulary items in context sentences and conducted the Vocabulary Knowledge Scale (VKS) test developed by Wesche and Paribakht (1996) with 1st years students of Tourism and Hospitality and students of Business Economics of the Libertas International University. The results obtained by descriptive statistics, Mann-Whitney U test and Spearman’s rank correlation confirm our general hypothesis.

Open access

Irfan Arikan, Ilker Ünsever and Salma Halioui

Abstract

When looking at the increase of tourism in a destination, it can be said that tourism is a valuable part of the economy. The proposal offered by today’s competitive paradigm: that higher the number of tourists visiting a city, the higher the income, sounds good at first. The increased number of tourist arrivals gives the appearance of increasing desirability of the city. Parallel with the increased tourism activities, new buildings, new lifestyles, foreign capital and new socio-economic relationships appear rapidly and replace the traditional ones. However, there will be a huge amount of social, cultural, economic and environmental problems faced by the local people as well as the tourists the city. Tourism paradox is the name given to the phenomenon where tourism industry destroys natural and cultural environment in a destination that is necessary for tourism activities. On the other hand the balance, which does not change and disturbs the social and economic relations at the destination is called “tourism equinox”. Therefore, spatial reorganization and urban regeneration play a crucial role for the marketing of cities and this transformation action affects all infrastructure facilities, restorations of old buildings, reorganization of historical zones, and revitalizing the architectural style of the cities. New projects and approaches to solve the problems caused by the growth of urban populations and to establish healthy sustainable tourism destinations are becoming more important than ever. Tourism detox is a treatment that is intended to remove harmful substances from these destinations. This paper investigates the influence of tourism paradox and tourism equinox on urban environments in relation to tourism activities and the protection of natural and cultural resources with the help of tourism detox. It primarily relies on qualitative research to understand the main futures of tourism paradox, equinox and detox taking the physical and environmental aspects of urban environments into consideration. As research methodology a literature review and the sources of secondary data were used.

Open access

Barbara Pavlakovič, Nejc Pozvek and Andreja Trdina

://robidisce.blogspot.si/p/nastanitev-accomodation_31.html , 13. 9. 2016. LICHROU, MARIA, O’MALLEY, LISA AND PATTERSON, MAURICE (2008), “Place-Product or Place Narrative(s)? Perspectives in the Marketing of Tourism Destinations”. Journal of Strategic Marketing 16 (1): 27-39 JOHANSSON, ROLF (2003), “Case study Methodology”. A key note speech at the International Conference “Methodologies in Housing Research”, 22-24. 9. 2003. Available on: http://psyking.net/HTMLobj-3839/Case_Study_Methodology-_Rolf_Johansson_ver_2.pdf , 1. 9. 2016. KAPETANOVIĆ, ŽANA (30. 5. 2016), “Pri babici v Brežicah

Open access

Gordana Pešalj, Svetlana Uršič, Ivana Jovanović, Svetlana Zdravković, Ljubica Presetnik and Gorana Isailović

Abstract

Nature has been shown to be beneficial to our overall health and well-being. We are all connected to nature and it is important to maintain this vital connection for our health and well-being. Spending time outside in nature or urban parks has been shown to positively affect a person’s emotions and improve their sense of well-being. Access to nature balances circadian rhythms, lowers blood pressure, reduces stress and increases absorption of Vitamin D. Increasingly, evidence demonstrates that contactwith the living world around us is an important part of healing and recovery. The natural world’s role in human well-being is an essential, yet often forgotten, aspect of healthcare. Of particular importance are the benefits one can derive through interaction with natural environments. Reincorporating the natural world is practiced to move healthcare toward being more “green”. Spiritual well-being is enhanced through the experience of greater interconnections, and it occurs when interacting with the natural world. One study examined the physiological and psychological responses to real forest landscapes as well as the therapeutic uses of forests relative to urban environments.

Lower levels of the stress hormone cortisol have been reported in adults subsequent to performing the same mental activities in a garden setting vs. an indoor classroom. A separate study involving over 11,000 adults from Denmark showed that living more than 1 km away from green space (forests, parks, beaches, lakes) were 42 percent more likely to report high stress and had the worst scores on evaluations of general health, vitality, mental health and bodily pain The landscape itself offers retreat from daily routine. The aim of our research was to measure the effects of Forest SPA programs on attendants’ well-being. Research has been organized in cooperation between Health college Belgrade and Medical SPA Association of Serbia. There were fourteen participants taking part in the research. Prior to Forest SPA program all participants, 14 students on specialization in Medical Wellness were invited to half-an-hour active imagination (mandala drawing) workshop. Drawing Mandala is a meditation in motion, dreaming with open eyes, and during the process of active imagination the unconscious self is active and not passive like in dreams. Using the data and research methodology from Henderson’s Empirical Study of the Healing Nature of Artistic Expression we designed our investigation. After 90 minutes of Forest SPA program in selected Urban park, participants were invited to draw mandala to describe how they feel at that moment. Several participants (8 of them) attended a 90-minute City SPA program with Tibetan bowls vibration massage. At the end of the SPA program they were invited to draw mandala. Analyzing symbols and colors, number of symbols and their relationship in presented mandalas we can realize the effects of the Forest SPA programs in urban parks on achieving better emotional balance and enhancing individualization process in participants. Our pilot research of Active imagination (by drawing mandalas) revealed that it can be used as a part of Forest SPA program as ART therapy and at the same time as an instrument for individual approach to the client of Forest SPA program as a medical SPA concept.

Open access

Marina Gregorić, Margareta Nađ and Martina Gregorić

Abstract

The phenomenon of globalization has led to the development of various selective forms of tourism. One of them is MICE tourism known in Croatia as a business form of tourism. Business tourism is still a relatively new concept and covers all aspects of business travel. The development of business travel has led to the development of congress tourism as a separate form of business tourism which is the focus of this paper. Congress tourism is a lucrative segment of the tourist offer that often takes place out of the tourist season. It requires quality congress facilities which can meet the needs of the participants and organizers of the congress. The main role of congress tourism is to gather participants from different countries and promote different products, services, training, education and many other fields of business while at the same time it promotes the hosting destination and its tourism attractions. The aim of this paper is to research and determine the current situation, supply and demand of the Croatian meetings and congress industry in comparison with the neighbouring destinations, the Republic of Slovenia and the Republic of Serbia. The study and comparison between three destinations imply changes that need to take place to improve the congress offer, to detect what the competitive position of the Republic of Croatia is, which marketing activities to improve so that the Republic of Croatia can become a competitive destination in the region and Europe. Congress tourism as a form of business tourism in Croatia is growing. The most prominent cities in this form of tourism are Zagreb, Dubrovnik and Opatija. The objectives pursued in Croatian congress offer are: the number of participants in congresses, strengthening the quality of congress offer and infrastructure, ensuring coordinated actions of stakeholders and increasing the recognition and awareness of Croatia as a congress destination. Since joining the EU, Slovenia has become an interesting destination for other members of the EU. Congress activity in Slovenia is booming, with a growing number of modern equipped convention venues with modern facilities for implementation of convention events. Slovenia has three major congress destinations; Ljubljana, Portorož and Bled that meet the conditions for organizing congresses. The Republic of Serbia with its tourism development strategy, presented business tourism as a potential selective form of tourism that can contribute to increasing tourist traffic of local and foreign tourists. Congress destinations that represent an ideal destination for congresses are: Belgrade, Novi Sad and Zlatibor. The application of sustainable development in the area of congress tourism plays an important role in form of preservation of resources and environmental protection. Therefore, congress tourism should be managed in a way to meet economic, social, ecological and aesthetic needs of a destination. Methodology used in this research paper consists of desk research, descriptive method, historical method, method of analysis, synthesis and comparative method. Beside secondary data analysis through literature review data are induced from Central Bureau of Statistics, the Institute for Tourism, Zagreb Tourist Board, Tourist Board of Opatija, The Dubrovnik Tourist Board, Serbian Convention Bureau and Research as well as from available published articles, books and internet data related to Slovenian business tourism. This research paper contributes to further scientific research and improvements needed in order to continuously develop and increase the size and quality of business tourism.

Open access

Elżbieta Baczyńska, Marek W. Lorenc and Urszula Kaźmierczak

Abstract

Post-mining workings, especially after the exploitation of the rocks, become attractive mainly because of their landscape forms. These new forms of landscape can be an important element of tourist interest, and can cause the regional tourist revival. Quarries, as a quite specific forms, may, however, be received by individuals, as more or less attractive. The existing methods of landscape attractiveness evaluation cannot be directly applied to assess the attractiveness of abandoned quarries without the introduction of some partial criteria. The article attempts to present the methodological basis of the procedure for evaluating the attractiveness of the landscape of the quarries by setting new criteria for such an assessment. To do this, the method of semantic differential, called the Osgood’s Method, was used, as well as principles of entropy and point bonitation. The evaluation of the attractiveness of the quarries’ landscape consists of the results of these methods. On such basis, four classes of the attractiveness of the landscape of abandoned quarries have been defined.

Open access

Jari K. Nenonen and Svetlana V. Stepanova

Nagy, G. (2013) Tourism in peripheric regions - the possibilities of thematic routes. Analele Universității din Oradea. Seria Geografie, vol. 2, 220-228. Kropinova, Е. and Anokhin, А. (2014) The development of new trans-border water routes in the South-East Baltic: methodology. Baltic Region, vol. 3, nr. 21, 145-162. Madziarz, M. (2013) Historical ore mining sites in Lower Silesia (Poland) as geo-tourism attraction. Acta Geoturistica. vol. 4, nr. 1, 15-26. Metsähallitus, available at: http