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JrJung Lyu, Hai-Lun Chao, Chia-Wen Chen and Li-Yu Huang

References Benz, G., & Paddison, N. V. (2004). Developing Patient-Based Marketing Strategies. Healthcare Executive , vol. 19, no. 5, pp. 40-42. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Chronic Disease and Health Promotion, Available at: http://www.cdc.gov/chronicdisease/overview/index.htm, Accessed June 5, 2010. Chahal, H. (2010). Two Component Customer Relationship Management Model for Healthcare Services. Managing Service Quality , vol. 20, no. 4, pp. 343-365. Chalmeta, R. (2006). Methodology for Customer Relationship Management. Journal of

Open access

Jr-Jung Lyu, Hai-Lun Chao, Chia-Wen Chen and Li-Yu Huang

References Benz, G., & Paddison, N. V. (2004). Developing Patient-Based Marketing Strategies. Healthcare Executive , vol. 19, no. 5, pp. 40-42. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Chronic Disease and Health Promotion, Available at: http://www.cdc.gov/chronicdisease/overview/index.htm, Accessed June 5, 2010. Chahal, H. (2010). Two Component Customer Relationship Management Model for Healthcare Services. Managing Service Quality , vol. 20, no. 4, pp. 343-365. Chalmeta, R. (2006). Methodology for Customer Relationship Management. Journal of

Open access

Ali Bavik and Tara Duncan

Abstract

Defining and measuring organizational culture (OC) is of paramount importance to organizations because a strong culture could potentially increase service quality and yield sustainable competitive advantages. However, such process could be challenging to managers because the scope of OC has been defined differently across disciplines and industries, which has led to the development of various scales for measuring OC. In addition, previously developed OC scales may also not be fully applicable in the hospitality and tourism context. Therefore, by highlighting the key factors affecting the business environment and the unique characteristics of hospitality industry, this paper aims to align the scope of OC closely with the industry and to put forth the need for a new OC scale that accurately responds to the context of the hospitality industry.

Open access

Fotis Vouzas, Alexandros Psychogios and Loukas Tsironis

. Mangen, S. (1999), “Qualitative research methods in cross-national settings”, International Journal of Social Research Methodology , vol. 2, n. 2, pp. 109-124. Naslund, D. (2008), “Lean, Six Sigma and Lean Sigma: Fads or Real Process Improvement Methods”, Business Process Management , vol. 14, n. 3, pp. 269-287. Neuhaus, K. and Guarraia, P. (2007), “Want More From Lean Six Sigma”, Harvard Management Update , vol. 12, n.12, pp. 3-5. Nonthaleerak, P. and Hendry, L. (2008), “Exploring the Six Sigma phenomenon using multiple case study evidence”, Int. Journal of

Open access

Palmira López-Fresno

Abstract

To continuously and systematically improve efficiency and efficacy of processes, organizations need the implication of all employees in continuous improvement and innovation through suitable Quality Management Programs (QMPs). Effectiveness of these programs is directly linked to the requirement employees understand the methodologies and tools used for QM and the benefits that will derivate from their implementation, individually and collectively, so they can commit and implicate. Lean Management is a friendly methodology to continuously and systematically achieve process improvement, so helping the organization seeking operational excellence that contributes to overall excellence. This paper identifies Critical Success Factors (CSFs) for an effective implementation of QMPs, suggests Lean Management as an easy-to-understand, powerful and friendly methodology for operational excellence and overall excellence, and presents a case experience of implementation of Lean Management in a health care organization that applies the EFQM model, and the lessons learnt.

Open access

Thong-Ngee Goh

Abstract

Six Sigma as a quality improvement framework has gained considerable popularity in the past two decades. Its extension Lean Six Sigma has also been embraced by many organizations for improvement of quality and business competitiveness. One important factor for the popularity of Six Sigma and Lean Six Sigma is their potential for improving service systems, in contrast to the conventional perceptions that only manufacturing systems can benefit from statistics-based methodologies. There are however a number of issues related to the nature of service systems that must be resolved before the full benefits of Lean Six Sigma can be realized. In this paper, these issues are discussed from a practical point of view from three angles: analytical, organizational, and personal. Awareness of the existence of such issues, if not the answers to all of them, is a pre-requisite to effective adoption of Lean Six Sigma tools.