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Helga Judit Feith, Ágnes Lukács J., Edina Gradvohl, Rita Füzi, Sarolta Mészárosné Darvay, Ilona Bihariné Krekó and András Falus

Abstract

Health-related attitudes can be modified and supported most effectively at young ages. Young generations require more interpersonal and interactive pedagogical methods in programs engaged in health promotion, as well. The aim of the authors was to get an insight into a relatively novel pedagogical method, called peer education. This multilateral activity is focusing the procedure on attitudes, experience, and motivation of youngsters in connection with health promotion programs and community service work. In this article, the authors describe 1) the theory, origin, and principal influences of peer education compared to traditional teaching methods and 2) the new, efficiency-oriented and science-based methodology of health education program.

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Acta Universitatis Sapientiae, Social Analysis

The Journal of Sapientia Hungarian University of Transylvania

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Yuko Kambara

the ERC Make? (Forum: Rethinking Euro-Anthropology). Social Anthropology 23(3): 338–339. Mughal, Muhammad Aurang Zeg. 2015. Being and Becoming Native: a Methodological Enquiry into Doing Anthropology at Home. Anthropological Notebooks 21(1): 121–132. Mughal, Muhammad Aurang Zeg. 2012. Boundary Mechanisms in the Formulation of National Identity: a Case Study of Students in the English Department at Selye János University. Eruditio-Educatio 7(3): 106–121. Mughal, Muhammad Aurang Zeg. 2014. Boundary Mechanisms in the Formulation of National

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Cristina Tîrhaş

: Polirom. Liamputtong, Pranee (ed.). 2008. Doing Cross-Cultural Research. Ethical and Methodological Perspectives . Dordrecht: Springer. Nisbet, Robert. 1969/1992. Social Change and History: Aspects of the Western Theory of Development . Oxford: Oxford University Press.

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Ernő Bogács and Andrea Rácz

Abstract

Following a discussion about ethics and social work, in this article, we will present the main results of three researches conducted in the past few years on the Hungarian child protection system. These studies highlight the professional gaps, the prejudiced beliefs related to the primary (children) and secondary (parents) client systems of child protection, the value crisis in professional mentalities, and the crisis of the profession in general. We argue that a change in mentalities and professional treatment in the operational practice requires a thorough reconsideration of the ethical dimensions of child protection to the extent of developing and introducing their own code of ethics. As the helping profession is actively involved in the transformation of the welfare state, in parallel with restructuring welfare conditions, we should reconsider how the scarce methodological framework for practice at the national level can cope with problems and how it can emancipate the clients and serve their well-being. The research results indicate that the direction of development is to create an activating and mobilizing helper system that can preserve the core values of the profession as well as adapt to social changes and reflect on the expectations of the public policy thereof.

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Blanka Bálint

Thanatológiai Szemle I./winter. Polcz, Alaine. 2005. Együtt az eltávozottal [Together with the Departed]. Pécs: Jelenkor Press. Pilling, János. 2012. A gyász hatása a testi és lelki egészségi állapotra . Doktori értekezés [The Effect of Grieving on the Physical and Mental State. PhD Thesis]. Budapest: Semmelweis Egyetem. Mentális Egészségtudományok Doktori Iskola. Sarungi, Emőke, Herke Dahlgren, Andrea. 2012. Gyógyulás a gyászból – Módszerismertetetés [Recovery from Grief—Presentation of Methodology). Kharón Thanatológiai Szemle XIV(1–2): 19

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Constanze Spieß

Abstract

Based on a dynamic, cultural-constructivist understanding of language and a multistage/ multi-level methodological approach of discourse semantics, this contribution analyzes a section of selected texts concerning the migration discourse. In this context, the controversial term Leitkultur is given special emphasis. It turns out that within political discourse this term is closely linked to self-positioning and positioning others.

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Aleida Assmann

Abstract

What keeps cultural studies in motion and, more difficult still, what hold them together? They are continuously animated through so-called ‚turns‘ that in regular intervals open up new perspectives and transform the leading issues and concepts. Such regular innovations are not only due to internal readjustments in terms of methodological changes but are also connected to cultural and social changes. In this way, cultural studies have become an integral part of the transformation of the world as we see and construct it. They are not only a lense through which we observe the transformation of the world, but also a tool with which it is produced. In this active engagement and entanglement with the real world, cultural studies have lost a sense of their professional boundaries. They are constantly extending their realm of research, incorporating avidly new territory. To the extent that cultural studies have embraced the project of cultural self-thematization and self-transformation, they have become as fluid and volatile as culture itself.

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Reinhold Schmitt and Anna Petrova

Abstract

This article explores how close one can come to a cultural-scientific perspective on the basis of a constitution-analytical methodology. We do this on the basis of a comparison of the celebration of Totensonntag in Zotzenbach (Southern Hesse) and Sarepta (Wolgograd). In both places, there are protestant churches that perform this ritual to commemorate the dead on this “Sunday of the Dead” as a part of their church service. Our scientific interest lies in the reconstruction of the rituality produced during the in situ execution. In both services, the names of the deceased are read out and a candle is lit for each deceased person. In Zotzenbach the priest reads out the names and an assistant ignites the candles for the deceased, whereas in Sarepta the bereaved are responsible for this. Since the ritual is organised in very different ways in terms of architecture-for-interaction (statically in Zotzenbach, spatially dynamic in Sarepta), we can reconstruct two completely different models of rituality: a demonstrative one (Zotzenbach) and a participative one (Sarepta). The demonstrative model works on the basis of a finely tuned coordination between the two church representatives and is aimed at a dignified execution. The model in Sarepta is not suitable for the production of formality due to its participatory structure. Here, however, the focus is also on the aspect of socialization, which goes beyond the church service and offers the Russian-German worshipers the opportunity to situationally constitute as a culturally homogeneous group.