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Deep Stories

Practicing, Teaching, and Learning Anthropology with Digital Storytelling

Mariela Nuñez-Janes, Aaron Thornburg and Angela Booker

Open access

Valentina Favrin, Elisabetta Gola and Emiliano Ilardi

Abstract

Nowadays, at the time of convergence culture, social network, and transmedia storytelling – when social interactions are constantly remediated – e-learning, especially in universities, should be conceived as a sharing educational activity. Different learning experiences should become smoother and able to fade out the closed learning environments (as software platform and classrooms (either virtual or not)). In this paper, we will show some experiences of the Communication Sciences degree program of the University of Cagliari, which is supplied through an e-learning method. In the ten years since its foundation, the approach has evolved from a blended learning with two kinds of traditional activity (online activities and face-to-face lessons) to a much more dynamic learning experience. Many new actors (communication companies, local government, public-service corporations, new media and social media) – indeed – have been involved in educational and teaching process. But also these processes changed: collaborative working, new media comprehension, self-guided problem solving are examples of the new literacies and approaches that can be reached as new learning objectives.

Open access

Anthony Potts, Nina Maadad and Marizon Yu

Press. Mitrofan, O., Paul, M. & Spencer, N. (2009). Is aggression in children with behavioural and emotional difficulties associated with television viewing and video game playing? a systematic review. Child: Care, Health & Development , 35(1), 5-15. Morrison, M. (2012).Understanding methodology. In A.R. Briggs, M. Coleman & M. Morrison (Eds), Research Methods in Educational Leadership and Management . CA: Sage Publications. Olchondra, R.T. (2012). Children influence buying patterns, poll says. Retrieved from http://business.inquirer.net/61337

Open access

Elena Firpo

References Arthur, J., Waring, M., & Coe R.,and Hedges L.V. (2012). Research Methods and Methodologies in Education. London: Sage Pubns Ltd. Bransford, D., Brown, A. & Cocking, R. (2000). How people learn: brain, mind, experience and school. Washington D.C: National Academic Press. Bonaiuti, G. & Calvani, A. (2007). Fondamenti di Didattica. Teoria e Prassi dei dispositivi formativi. Roma: Carocci. Coonan, C. M. (2014). I principi base del CLIL. In Paolo Balboni (Ed.). Fare CLIL. I quaderni della

Open access

Giampaolo Chiappini

Abstract

This article provides a methodology with two potential applications: to prove useful to maths teachers for analysing and evaluating the educational potential of different digital artefacts and to help designers of maths learning artefacts to evaluate their design during the implementation phase. The educational potential of an artefact is considered as an entity determined by actions and representations structure available within the artefact, the interpretation and behaviour of who uses it and the features of the activity in which it is used. The proposed methodology is based on the notions of affordance, narrative and cycle of expansive learning. The methodology has been applied on AlNuSet, a system designed for supporting the teaching and learning of algebra by means of modalities of interaction that are of visual, spatial and motor nature.

Open access

Magdalena Mirkowicz and Grzegorz Grodner

Abstract

The authors describe issues related to the phenomenon of blogs as a channel of communication in relation to Polish blogosphere. The main hypothesis is assuming the pursuit of the Polish blogosphere for proper technological development. The methodology of the research is based on quantitative analysis of the occurrence of Jakob Nielsen’s heuristics, within the studied 50 randomly selected Polish blogs. The methodology is based on an analysis of the case aimed at confirming or denying the occurrence of the heuristics. As a result of the conducted research, the occurrence level of heuristics in the studied group was confirmed.

Open access

Kamil Olechowski

Abstract

The aim of this thesis was to analyze the speeches of politicians of the two largest Polish parties: Prawo i Sprawiedliwość and Platforma Obywatelska, using post-dependence theory. The work describes postcolonial and post-dependence theories, presents socially political divisions – in the categories of right wing and left wing politics – and describes the methodological issues of critical discourse analysis. The subject of analysis in the research part of the thesis were politics’ speeches on the following topics: the “Rodzina 500+” programme, terrorist attacks, the dispute with the Constitutional Court in Poland, Brexit and the Smolensk catastrophe. The goal of the analysis was to find the post-dependence discourse features.

Open access

Mykola Rashkevych

Abstract

In the article the methodological and applied criteria of symbolist publicism as an independent form of analytical journalism are defined. The subject of the research is the argumentative basis and semantic resources of public statements of philosophers and writers, i.e. the representatives of Russian symbolism. The relevance of the topic is due to the crisis of modern publicism, which becomes similar to a product and leads to mental and moral enslavement. The general purpose of the study is the legitimization of the term «symbolist publicism». Genre-stylistic peculiarities of symbolist text-making, as well the outlook landmarks of symbolic representatives of the Silver Age, were studied by E. Kassierer, M. Voskresenskaya, A. Mazurchuk, O. Matyushkin, O. Ponomarev, L. Kravets, and others.

Open access

Ezio Del Gottardo and Salvatore Patera

Abstract

As a result of enactment of Law 297/1999, many Italian universities could improve the opportunities in applied research, activating spin-offs and start-ups in conformity with those regulations. This is a new challenge in the universities’ mission: universities are capable (and therefore they are asked) to generate not only new knowledge and competent professional profiles, but also to make a new effort in implementing the “third mission” for promoting social innovation. Considering this background, we present a research project - a training intervention named “Participatory culture, personal branding and organisational wellness” - by Espéro Pvt, a spin-off of the University of Salento, for Geodata Engineering Ltd., located in Turin, Italy. Presented below are the theoretical framework (learning organisation, empowerment evaluation and organisational wellness) and the methodology, as well as the first results.

Open access

Karen Johnson, J. Medgar Roberts, Mary W. Stout, Michelle Susberry Hill and Lisa Wells

Abstract

In a global society where knowledge, degrees, and credentials cross international borders, understanding what and how doctoral students think and communicate about learning is relevant to educational leadership. An implication could be in creating new solutions to the age-old problem of students completing coursework but not a dissertation, and therefore, not graduating. United States doctoral students are taking advantage of social media platforms to create, develop, or enhance Personal Learning Networks (PLN). A team of researchers using a qualitative research methodology studied both the views and experiences of nine doctoral students, who were members of a closed Facebook group created specifically as a PLN. The results of the research study confirmed that the students use social media for academic and personal communication, emotional support, and direction through the dissertation stage of doctoral studies. Thematic results concluded that the participants sought help with questions and answers about research, guidance on the Institutional Review Board (IRB) process, and celebrating achievements. Trust was also a significant factor in ensuring the completion of dissertations. The results provide educational leaders useful information and insight into the impact of social media on teaching, research, culture, and learning environmental designs.