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Helena Heroldová

Abstract

The study focuses on the methodology of research on recycled clothing. Two Chinese Dragon Robes from the collection of the Náprstek Museum were remade as a men’s jacket and a woman’s evening dress. Both examples are described, analysed and interpreted from two points of view: as authentic Dragon Robes in its original Imperial China setting, as well as newly made clothes in the context of the early 20th century Western culture.

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Kinetic Landscapes

The Cide Archaeological Project: Surveying the Turkish Western Black Sea Region

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Helena Heroldová

Society and History 38/1, 3–25 ( https://www.jstor.org/stable/179336 [1 October 2018]); 1998 Prisoners of Shangri-la: Tibetan Buddhism and the West . The University of Chicago Press; Luczanits, Christian 2001 “Methodological Comments Regarding Recent Research on Tibetan Art”, in: Wiener Zeitschrift für die Kunde Südasiens / Vienna Journal of South Asian Studies 45, pp. 125–145 ( https://www.jstor.org/stable/24007569 [1 October 2018]); Oldeburg, Sergěj Fedorovič – Wiener, Leo 1897 “Notes on Buddhist Art”, in: Journal of the American Oriental

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Claudia Glatz, Bleda S. Düring, Toby C. Wilkinson, Bernard Gratuze, Richard Jones, Effie Photos-Jones and Victor Klinkenberg

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Regula Schmid

Abstract

The designation Harnischrödel (rolls of armour) lumps together different kinds of urban inventories. They list the names of citizens and inhabitants together with the armour they owned, were compelled to acquire within their civic obligations, or were obliged to lend to able-bodied men. This contribution systematically introduces Harnischrödel of the 14th and 15th c. as important sources for the history of urban martial culture. On the basis of lists preserved in the archives of Swiss towns, it concentrates on information pertaining to the type and quality of an average urban soldier’s gear. Although the results of this analysis are only preliminary – at this point, it is not possible to produce methodologically sound statistics –, the value of the lists as sources is readily evident, as only a smattering of the once massive quantity of actual objects has survived down to the present time.

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Limits of Understanding in the Study of Lost Martial Arts

Epistemological Reflections on the Mediality of Historical Records of Technique and the Status of Modern (Re-)Constructions

Eric Burkart

, Brian R., ‘A Proposed Methodology for the Validation of Historical European Martial Arts’, Initial. A Review of Medieval Studies , 3 (2015), 57–70. Reckwitz, Andreas, Die Transformation der Kulturtheorien: Zur Entwicklung eines Theorieprogramms , 3rd edn (Weilerswist: Velbrück, 2012). Riemer, Nick, Introducing Semantics , Cambridge Introductions to Language and Linguistics (Cambridge, New York: Cambridge University Press, 2010). Spatz, Ben, What a Body Can Do: Technique as Knowledge, Practice as Research (Abingdon: Routledge, 2015

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Daniel Jaquet, Claus Frederik Sørensen and Fabrice Cognot

Abstract

Historical European martial arts (HEMA) have to be considered an important part of our common European cultural heritage. Studies within this field of research have the potential to enlighten the puzzle posed by past societies, for example in the field of history, history of science and technology, or fields related to material culture.

The military aspects of history are still to be considered among the most popular themes of modern times, generating huge public interest. In the last few decades, serious HEMA study groups have started appearing all over the world – focusing on re-creating a lost martial art. The terminology “Historical European Martial Arts” therefore also refers to modem-day practices of ancient martial arts. Many of these groups focus on a “hands-on” approach, thus bringing practical experience and observation to enlighten their interpretation of the source material. However, most of the time, they do not establish inquiries based on scientific research, nor do they follow methodologies that allow for a critical analysis of the findings or observations.

This paper will therefore propose and discuss, ideas on how to bridge the gap between enthusiasts and scholars; since their embodied knowledge, acquired by practice, is of tremendous value for scientific inquiries and scientific experimentation. It will also address HEMA practices in the context of modern day acceptance of experimental (or experiential) processes and their value for research purposes and restoration of an historical praxis. The goal is therefore to sketch relevant methodological and theoretical elements, suitable for a multidisciplinary approach, to HEMA, where the “H” for “historical” matters.

Open access

J.P. Neto and J.N. Silva

Abstract

For games of complete information with no chance component, like Chess, Go, Hex, and Konane, some parameters have been identified that help us understand what makes a game pleasant to play. One of these goes by the name of drama.

Briefly, drama is linked to the possibility of recovering from a seemingly weaker position, if the player is strong enough. This is an important requirement to prevent initial advantages to be amplified into unavoidable and thus uninteresting victories. Drama is a feature that arguably good board games should have, since it is relevant in the perception of the play experience as pleasant.

Despite its intrinsic qualitative nature, we suggest the adaptation of the concept of drama to games of pure chance and propose a set of objective criteria to measure it. Some parameters are here used to compare Goose-like games, which we compute via computer simulation for some well-know games. A statistical analysis is performed based on the play of millions of matches done by computer simulation. The article discusses correlations and patterns found among the collected data. The methodology presented herein is general and can be used to compare other types of board games.

Open access

Mátyás Miskolczi

Information Science & Technology; Nov. 2001, Vol. 52 Issue 13, pp. 1100-1105. Ivancheva, L. (2008): Scientometrics Today: A Methodological Overview. Collnet Journal of Scientometrics and Information Management. Vol.2., No.2. de, 2008. pp. 47-56. Krishnan, A. (2009): What are Academic Disciplines? Some observations on the Disciplinarity vs. Interdisciplinarity debate. Working Paper, University of Southampton National Centre for Research Methods. Palmer, A. L. - Sesé, A. - Montaño, J. J. (2005)Tourism and Staistics