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Rapid and Specific Detection of Escherichia coli O157:H7 in Ground Beef Using Immunomagnetic Separation Combined with Loop-Mediated Isothermal Amplification

H., Long B., Wu X., Bai Y., Development of a Loop-Mediated Isothermal Amplification Assay for sensitive and rapid detection of Cronobacter sakazakii. Foodborne Pathog. Dis., 2012, 9, 1111-1118. 11. Francois P., Tangomo M., Hibbs J., Bonetti E.J., Boehme C.C., Notomi T., Perkins M.D., Schrenzel J., Robustness of a loopmediated isothermal amplification reaction for diagnostic applications. FEMS Immunol. Med. Microbiol., 2011, 62, 41-48. 12. Fratamico P.M., Bagi L.K., Cray W.C. Jr., Narang N., Yan X., Medina M., Liu Y., Detection by

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Does SIRT-1 Mediate Calorie Restriction and Prolong Life? – A Mini Review

Abstract

Calorie restriction is the only intervention proved to prolong both average and maximum lifespan in yeast, worms, fish, rodents and possibly primates. Not only does the regimen prolong life, but it also reduces the incident of numerous age-related diseases like diabetes, atherosclerosis or cancer and slows down ageing. Mechanisms by which that is thought to occur have not yet been elucidated, but they probably involve reactive oxygen species signaling, insulin growth factor and transcriptional factors. Here, special emphasis is given to SIRT1 - silent information regulator. There is sound evidence showing that SIRT1 is a key player in mediating physiological response to calorie restriction and that its overexpression is correlated with extended lifespan. The possible mechanism leading to its elevated levels is high NAD/NADH ratio, observed in Sir2 in yeast. SIRT1 increases glucose production, enhances fat mobilization, stimulates angiogenesis, prevents neuronal degeneration and rises insulin sensitivity. Therefore, it seems to be a very beneficial factor activated by such a simple intervention that is calorie restriction.

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Exogenous isoleucine and phenylalanine interact with abscisic acid-mediated anthocyanin accumulation in grape

. Integr. Genomics 10, 367-381. M ac D onald M.J., D’C unha G.B., 2007. A modern view of phenylalanine ammonia lyase. Biochem. Cell Biol. 85, 273-282. M atus J.T., L oyola R., V ega A., N eira A.P., B ordeu E., J ohnson P.A., et al ., 2009. Post-veraison sunlight exposure induces MYB-mediated transcriptional regulation of anthocyanin and flavonol synthesis in berry skins of Vitis vinifera . J. Exp. Bot. 60, 853-867. M ikami M., M ori D., M asumura Y., A oki Y., S uzuki S., 2017. Electrical stimulation: an abiotic stress generator for

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Garlic Sulfur Compounds Suppress Cancerogenesis and Oxidative Stress: a Review

-3278(96)90061-7. Benavides GA, Squadrito GL, Mills RW, Patel HD, Isbell TS, Patel RP, Darley-Usmar VM, Doeller JE, Kraus DW (2007): Hydrogen sulfide mediates the vasoactivity of garlic. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, 104, 17977-17982. doi: 10.1073/ pnas.0705710104. Block E, Ahmad S, Jain MK, Crecely RW, Apitzcastro R, Cruz MR (1984): (E,Z)-ajoene - a potent antithrombotic agent from garlic. Journal of the American Chemical Society, 106, 8295-8296. doi: 10.1021/ja00338a049. Borek C (2001): Antioxidant health

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Transformation of methane in peatland environments

Abstract

Wetlands and particularly peatlands are the main natural source of methane. Data indicate that 10-45% of methane emission comes from these sources. Methane emission from wetlands is the result of the balance between methanogenesis and methanotrophic processes and is actively affected by the wetland plant community composition. There are many factors affecting the balance of CH4: for instance, vegetation has a strong effect on CH4 emissions from wetland ecosystems by influencing methane production, consumption and transport in the soil. The effects of plants on methane fluxes may be mediated by: molecular diffusion, internal transport through plant aerenchyma tissues and ebullition. Methane is formed in the process of methanogenesis under anaerobic conditions. It may then be emitted into the atmosphere directly from the soil or by internal transport through the plant. Alternatively, it may undergo methane oxidation by methanotrophic bacteria, both free-living in the root zone and associated with the host plant in symbiosis. Sphagnum moss is of particular importance for this processes as it contains methanotrophic bacteria in its endophytic system. Methanotrophic bacteria live inside the dead hyaline cells or on the surface of Sphagnum leaves and are able to oxidise methane produced in the soil during methanogenesis, making peatlands a natural biofilter for methane, one of the main greenhouse gases

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Repellence and attraction of Apis mellifera foragers by nectar alkaloids

Abstract

Plant secondary metabolites present naturally in nectar, such as alkaloids, may change the behavioural responses of floral visitors and affect pollination. Some studies have shown that nectar containing low concentrations of these secondary metabolites is preferred by honey bee foragers over pure nectar. However, it remains unclear whether this is caused by dependence or addictive behaviour, a simple taste preference, or by other conditions such as self-medication. In our choice experiment, free-flying bees were presented with artificial flowers holding 20% sucrose containing 0.5−50 μg ml−1 of one of the naturally occurring nectar alkaloids - caffeine, nicotine, senecionine, and gelsemine. Nectar uptake was determined by weighing each flower and comparing the weight to that of the control flower. Our experimental design minimized memorizing and marking; despite this, caffeine was significantly preferred at concentrations 0.5−2 μg ml−1 over control nectar; this preference was not observed for other alkaloids. All of the compounds tested were repellent at concentrations above 5 μg ml−1. We confirmed previous reports that bees exhibit a preference for caffeine, and hypothesize that this is not due only to addictive behaviour but is at least partially mediated by taste preference. We observed no significant preference for nicotine or any other alkaloid.

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The In Silico Predicton of the Chloroplast Maturase K Gene Polymorphism in Several Barley Varieties

Abstract

This study was conducted to describe the role of the chloroplast maturase K (matK) genetic polymorphism in the reciprocal crossing between five barley varieties using several in vitro / in silico tools. Besides, the final consequences of the matK gene polymorphism on its protein structure, function, and interactions were predicted computationally. Five parental varieties were crossed to each other by full reciprocal crossing design, DNA was extracted from seeds and two different primers’ pairs were designed to scan matK gene. Then, polymerase chain reaction - single-stranded conformation polymorphism (PCR-SSCP) were performed. Two distinct haplotypes in both parents and artificial F1 hybrids in the matK gene were observed in both amplified fragments. This finding indicated that the studied gene had no participation in the reciprocal crossing performed. Three SNPs were identified; two of them are non-synonymous (nsSNPs), namely G387V and L459M. The effect of these missense mutations on the matK protein was analyzed by several in silico tools. It was shown that the coding SNP, L459M was predicted to have much more effective consequences on matK protein structure and function. While the I-Mutant 2.0 prediction tool showed a decrease in stability for these two nsSNPs, which may destabilize the protein interactions to some extent. In conclusion, though the observed missense mutations in the matK gene have no suggestive role in the reciprocally crossed barley varieties, they caused dramatic alterations in several matK protein moieties, which may lead to potential subsequent changes in the matK protein-mediated RNA splicing mechanisms.

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Organo-Sulphur Garlic Compounds Influence Viability of Mammalian Cells: A Review

): Comparison of antioxidant activity of hydroethanolic fresh and aged garlic extracts and their effects on cerebral ischemia. Food Chemistry, 140, 343–352. doi: 10.1016/j.foodchem.2013.02.053. Chen LY, Chen Q, Zhu XJ, Kong DS, Wu L, Shao JJ, Zheng SZ (2016): Diallyl trisulfide protects against ethanol-induced oxidative stress and apoptosis via a hydrogen sulfide-mediated mechanism. International Immunopharmacology, 36, 23–30. doi: 10.1016/j.intimp.2016.04.015. Chen WC, Hsu SS, Chou CT, Kuo CC, Huang JK, Fang YC, Chang HT, Tsai JY, Liao WC, Wang BW, Shieh P, Kuo

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Effect of Transgenic Maize Mon 810 on Selected Non-Target Organisms: The Bird Cherry-Oat Aphid (Rhopalosiphum padi L.) and its Predator - Green Lacewing (Chrysoperla carnea Steph.)

P. M., Bigler F. 1998. Effects of transgenic Bacillus thuringiensis corn-fed prey on mortality and development time of immature Chrysoperla carnea ( Neuroptera: Chrysopidae ). Environmental Entomology 27 : 480-487. Hilbeck A., Moar W. J., Pusztai-Carey M., Filippini A., Bigler F. 1999. Prey-mediated effects of Cry1Ab toxin and protoxin and Cry2A protoxin on the predator Chrysoperla carnea. Entomologia Experimentalis et Applicata 91 : 305-316. Jepson P. C., Croft B. A., Pratt G. E. 1994. Test systems to

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A Global Microarray Expression Profile of Grapevine miRNAs Isolated from Cell Suspensions Pre-Treated with Apoptosis Activators

. 5906, pp. 1387-1392 DOI: 10.1126/science.1165171. CHICHKOVA, N. V. - KIM, S. H. - TITOVA, E. S. - KAKLUM, M. - MOROZOV, V. S. - RUBTSOV, Y. P. - KALININA, N. O. - TALIANSKY, M. E. - VARTAPETIAN, A. B. 2004. A plant caspase-like protease activated during the hypersensitive response. In Plant Cell , vol. 16 , 2004, no. 1, pp. 157-171, DOI: 10.1105/tpc.017889. DING, Z. Y. - WANG, Y. H. - LUO, Z. K. - LEE, H. F. - HWANG, J. - CHIEN, C. T. - HUANG, M. L. 2011. Glial cell adhesive molecule unzipped mediates axon

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