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Procrastination is Detrimental to Undergraduate Students’ Self-Rated Creativity: The Mediating Role of State Anxiety

., Hu, Y., & Runco, M. A. (2015). Verbal divergent thinking facilitated by a pleasurable incubation interval. Psychology of Aesthetics, Creativity, and the Arts, 9(3), 286-295. doi: 10.1037/a0038851 Haycock, L. A., McCarthy, P., & Skay, C. L. (1998). Procrastination in college students: The role of self-efficacy and anxiety. Journal of Counseling and Development, 76, 317-324. Hayes, A. F. (2013). Introduction to mediation, moderation, and conditional process analysis : A regression-based approach: New York, NY: The Guilford Press

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Relations between Parenting Stress, Attachment, and Life Satisfaction in Mothers of Adolescent Children

. Schwarz, J. Bernhard, H. Flechtner, T. Kuchler, C. Hurny (Eds.), Lelensqualitat in der onkologie . Munchen: Zuckerschwerdt Verlag. Hinnen, C., Sanderman, R., Sprangers, M. A. G. (2009). Adult attachment as mediator between recollections of childhood and satisfaction with life. Clinical Psychology and Psychotherapy , 16 , 10‒21. Imai, K., Keele, L., Tingley, D., Yamamoto, T. (2011). Unpacking the black box of causality: Learning about causal mechanisms from experimental and observational studies. American Political Science Review , 105 , 765

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Producing Irony in Adolescence: A Comparison Between Face-to-Face and Computer-Mediated Communication

). Childhood bullying: Current empirical findings and future directions for research. Aggression and Violent Behavior , 9 (4), 379–400. Hancock, J.T. (2004). Verbal irony use in face-to-face and computer-mediated conversations. Journal of Language and Social Psychology , 23 (4), 447–463. Harris, M. & Pexman, P.M. (2003). Children’s perceptions of the social functions of verbal irony. Discourse Processes , 36 (3), 147–165. Herring, S. (2001). Computer-mediated discourse. In D. Schiffrin, D. Tannen, & H. Hamilton (Eds.), The Handbook of Discourse

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Children’s Mental State Talk, Empathy, and Attachments to Companion Animals

. New York: Worth. Batson, C. D., Lishner, D. A., Carpenter, A., Dulin, L., Harjusola-Webb, S., Stocks, E. L., & Sampat, B. (2003). . . . “As You Would Have Them Do Unto You”: Does Imagining Yourself in the Other’s Place Stimulate Moral Action? Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin , 29 , 1190–1201. Borowski, S., Zeman, J., & Baunstein, K. (2018). Social Anxiety and Social Emotional Functioning During Early Adolescence: The Mediating Role of Best Friends’ Emotion Socialization. Journal of Early Adolescence , 38 , 238–260. Bosacki, S. (2013

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Stance-taking in Spanish-speaking Preschoolers’ Argumentative Interaction

. Un estudio con niños de 3 a 5 años en distintos contextos de juego. Íkala, Revista de Lenguaje y Cultura , 19 (3), 251–267. Migdalek, M. J., Santibáñez Yáñez, C., & Rosemberg, C. R. (2014b). Estrategias argumentativas en niños pequeños: Un estudio a partir de las disputas durante el juego en contextos escolares. Revista Signos , 47 (86), 435–462. Nelson, K. (1996). Language in cognitive development. The emergence of the mediated mind . Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. Nelson, K. (2007). Young minds in social worlds: Experience, meaning

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Developing Theory of Mind Twenty-Five Years After the Publication of “Z Badań Nad Kompetencją Komunikacyjną Dziecka” (Edited by B. Bokus and M.Haman)

–690. Naughtin, C. K., Horne, K., Schneider, D., Venini, D., York, A., & Dux, P. E. (2017). Do implicit and explicit belief processing share neural substrates? Human Brain Mapping , 38 (9), 4760–4772. Nelson, K. (1998). Language in cognitive development: The emergence of the mediated mind. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. Nelson, K., Plesa, D., & Henseler, S. (1998). Children’s theory of mind: An experiential interpretation. Human Development , 41 (1), 7–29. Nijhof, A. D., Brass, M., Bardi, L., & Wiersema, J. R. (2016). Measuring mentalizing ability

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Utterances as tool-mediated specifications of affordances - ecological pragmatics

Abstract

The established descriptions of information structure assume that the basic cognitive unit is a categorization, and that the basic semantic structure is a predication. Descriptions based on these assumptions, however, cannot provide an adequate analysis of certain types of utterances that form a part of activities. The article presents a solution to this problem based on Wittgenstein’s private language argument and the concept of information in Gibson's theory of affordances. The basic cognitive assumption is that performers of activities attend to variations in the environment, for example visibility, and perceive the states of variations (e.g., 3000 feet). A state is defined as a local, temporary occurrence of a stimulus configuration that specifies an affordance. The basic pragmatic assumption, then, is that performers of activities share the states of variations by means of utterances. This ecological-pragmatic assumption allows for a rethinking of the usefulness of the reference-predicate distinction and bring forward different dimensions of informational analysis of utterances. It is claimed that an informative and accurate analysis of utterances that form a part of activities relies two distinctions: a distinction between a convention based regulation of attention and a convention based specification of an affordance, and a distinction between sharing information and nesting information

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