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József Horváth, Zsanett Tóth and Edit Mikó

persistency, female fertility, longevity, and lifetime profit index traits in Holstein dairy cattle, Journal of Dairy Science, 100 (2), 1246-1258. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.3168/jds.2016-11770 7. Holstein Association USA (2017). Genetic Evaluations for Productive Life, Somatic Cell Score and Net Merit Dollars, from http://www.holsteinusa.com/genetic_evaluations/ss_Gen_Eval_for_PL.html 8. Sewalem, A., Miglior, F., Kistemaker, G.J., Sullivan, P. & Van Doormaal, B.J. (2008), Relationship between reproduction traits and functional longevity in

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Aleksandra Owczarek, Monika Anna Olszewska and Jan Gudej

, and Okabe-Kado J. 2010. Ellagic acid, a natural polyphenolic com-pound, induces apoptosis and potentiates retinoic acid-induced differentiation of human leukemia HL-60 cells. International Journal of Hematology 92: 136-143. Haslam E. 2007. Vegetable tannins - Lessons of phytochemi-cal lifetime. Phytochemistry 68: 2713-2720. Hegnauer R. 1973. Chemotaxonomie der Pflanzen , Band VI. Birkhäuser Verlag, Basel. Hwang JM, Cho JS, Kim TH, and Lee YI. 2010. Ellagic acid protects hepatocytes from damage by inhibiting mito-chondrial production of reactive oxygen

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Anna Jóźwiak-Żurek, Monika Kozłowska and Katarzyna Nuc

dry weight of hydroponically grown cucumbers ( Cucumis sativus L.) using leaf length, width, and SPAD value. Scientia Horticulturae 111: 330-334. Conner JK, and Zangori LA. 1998. A garden study of the effects of ultraviolet-B radiation on pollination success and lifetime female fitness in Brassica. Oecologia 111: 388-395. Dixon RA, and Paiva NL. 1995. Stress-induced phenylpropanoid metabolism. Plant Cell 7: 1085-1097. Dos Santos WD, Ferrarese MLL, Nakamura CV, Mourão KSM, Mangolin

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M.M. Kelleher, F. Buckley, R.D. Evans and D.P. Berry

550 and 1250 days were retained for subsequent analysis. A binary trait, heifer calving rate (HCR), was defined as calved (HCR=1) or not (HCR=0) at least once during her lifetime. Heifers that died or were slaughtered without a recorded calving date were assigned zero for HCR. Similarly, heifers that were sold at an age older than 12 months without a subsequent recorded calving date were assigned a value of zero. Heifers sold prior to 12 months of age were coded as missing. Heifers with no calving, sale, slaughter or death data, born within 38 months of the date of

Open access

B. Murphy, P. Crosson, A.K. Kelly and R. Prendiville

digestibility (g/kg) 766.0 – 656.6 Water soluble carbohydrates (g/kg DM) 104.4 – – DM = dry matter. Animal and carcass performance At housing, HA were 16 kg heavier ( P < 0.05) than LA as the ADG during the grazing season was 0.10 kg greater ( P < 0.01) for HA ( Table 3 ). Live weight at slaughter was similar for LA and HA, but the carcass weight tended ( P = 0.08) to be greater for HA compared to that for LA. During the finishing period, the ADG tended ( P = 0.09) to be greater for LA than for HA. Lifetime ADG and live weight

Open access

B.P. Hyde, P.J. Forrestal, M.M.R. Jahangir, M. Ryan, A.F. Fanning, O.T. Carton, G.J. Lanigan and K.G. Richards

Introduction Nitrous oxide (N 2 O) is a greenhouse gas (GHG) with a global warming potential 298 times higher than CO 2 over a 100- year time horizon ( IPCC, 2007 ). In 2011, the atmospheric concentration of N 2 O was 391 ppm, which exceeds preindustrial levels by approximately 40% ( IPCC, 2013 ). In addition to its role as a GHG, N 2 O can also deplete the stratospheric ozone. The potential of N 2 O to influence global warming and stratospheric ozone depletion, in combination with its increasing concentration and long lifetime in the atmosphere, makes it

Open access

B. O’Brien and D. Hennessy

animal is issued by the registration agency. The passport must accompany the animal and be updated each time the animal is moved during its lifetime. The farmer is required to maintain an up-to-date herd register of all bovine animals on the farm. This must include a record of all animal births, all animals entering and leaving the farm and all animal deaths. As a consequence, the AIMS database can be used to verify the origin, identity and life history of each animal entering the food chain. It can also be used to assist in the identification and tracing of bovines

Open access

Jasmin Putz, Eva M. Vorwagner and Gernot Hoch

Abstract

Flight performance of Monochamus sartor and Monochamus sutor, two potential vectors of the pine wood nematode, Bursaphelenchus xylophilus was evaluated in laboratory flight mill tests. Beetles emerging from logs infested in the laboratory and incubated under outdoor conditions as well as field collected beetles were used. The maximum distance flown by M. sartor in a single flight was 3,136.7 m. Mean distances (per beetle) per flight ranged from 694.6 m in females to 872.5 m in males for M. sartor. In 75% of all individual flights M. sartor flew less than 1 km; only 3.7% flew distances longer than 2 km. The mean cumulative distance travelled by M. sartor beetles throughout their lifespan was 7.5 km. The smaller M. sutor beetles flew faster and longer distances. The maximum distance per flight was 5,556.5 m; mean distances ranged from 1,653.6 m in females to 1178.3 m in males. The number of available laboratory reared beetles was too low for quantification of lifetime flight capacity for M. sutor. The findings are compared to published data from Monochamus galloprovincialis recorded on the same type of flight mill as well as to field data from mark-release-recapture studies. The high flight capacity of Monochamus beetles illustrates the importance of considering dispersal of the vectors when planning control measures against the pine wood nematode.

Open access

Zahra Tazerouni and Ali Asghar Talebi

Abstract

Sipha maydis (Passerini) is a pest of Poaceae in many cereal-growing area of the world and Iran. The effects of temperature on biology and life table were investigated at five constant temperatures (15, 20, 25, 30 and 32.5±1°C), 60±5% relative humidity (RH) and a photoperiod of 16L : 8D h. The results indicated that aphids failed to complete development at 32.5°C. Developmental time was ranged between 17.28 to 9.55 days at 15 and 30°C, respectively. The lower developmental threshold (T0) and thermal constant of S. maydis were estimated to be –5.52°C and 332.22 degree-days, respectively. The Analytis-3/Briere-1 model (as non linear model) is highly recommended for the description of temperature dependent development of S. maydis. The highest life expectancy of adults at emergence was 33.35 days at 20°C. The mean adult longevity of females and nymphipositional period were the highest at 20°C. The mean lifetime fecundity at 15, 20, 25 and 30°C were 21.24±1.97, 44.82±3.18, 22.25±2.33 and 16.39±1.15 nymphs/female, respectively. The survivorship curves of S. maydis were type I at 20 and 25°C (H < 0.5) and type III at 15 and 30°C (H > 0.5). The highest and lowest values of intrinsic rate of increase (rm) were observed at 20 (0.173±0.012 females/female/day) and 15°C (0.109±0.003 females/female/ /day), respectively. The growth index (GI) at 15, 20, 25 and 30°C were 0.033, 0.069, 0.062 and 0.038, respectively. According to this research the optimum temperature for population growth of S. maydis was 20°C. Our findings provide fundamental information and when this information is used in association with other ecological data, it may be valuable in development and implementation of management programs of S. maydis.

Open access

Danuta Woreta and Lidia Sukovata

Wpływ pokarmu na rozwój chrząszczy chrabąszcza kasztanowca (Melolontha hippocastani F.) (Coleoptera, Melolonthidae)