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Francesca Pierini

Abstract

Marina Fiorato’s The Glassblower of Murano (2008) tells the story of Eleonora, a young woman who travels to Venice in search of her genealogical past and existential roots. Coming from London, Eleonora incarnates a “modern” outlook on what she assumes to be the timeless life and culture of Venice. At one point in the novel, admiring the old houses on the Canal Grande, Eleonora is “on fire with enthusiasm for this culture where the houses and the people kept their genetic essence so pure for millennia that they look the same now as in the Renaissance” (2008, 15). This discourse of pure origins and unbroken continuities is a fascinating fantasizing on characteristics that extend from the urban territory to the people who inhabit it. Within narratives centred on this notion, Italian culture, perceived as holding a privileged relation with history and the past, is often contrasted with the displacement and rootlessness that seem to characterize the modern places and people of England and North America. Through a discussion of two Anglo-American popular novels set in Italy, and several relocation narratives, this paper proposes an exploration of the notion according to which history is the force cementing the identities of societies perceived as less modern and frozen in a timeless dimension. From a point in time when the dialectics of history have been allegedly transcended, Anglo-American popular narratives observe Italy as a timeless, pre-modern other.

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Practicing Home in the Foreign

The multiple homing practices of artisan journeymen on the tramp

Dorte Jagetic Andersen and René Ejbye Pedersen

Abstract

Research in migrant practices has recognised that home crystallises into multiple forms subject to constant re-enactment when viewed from the perspective of mobile populations such as nomads and refugees. In this article, we illustrate how artisan journeymen who went on the tramp around the turn of the 20th century performed home in multiple ways when on the road and at arrival in new locations. Using a historical example, we oppose the suggestion, which is common in contemporary migration and transnational studies that recent years have witnessed a paradigmatic new way of enacting belonging. Ultimately, the argument is that instead of idealising certain notions of the traveller, or ways of practicing home, we need to keep an eye to the real-life tensions of homing and the multiplicity through which it expresses; we need to understand homing as the performance of “belonging trouble.”

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Rolle Alho and Mika Helander

informal measures do the pickers rely on in trying to secure their living and working conditions in Finland? Our theoretical point of departure is Mark Granovetter’s (1985) concept of embeddedness, which stresses that economic relations are embedded in concrete social networks and do not exist in an abstract idealised market. Despite the limitations 1 Granovetter has been e.g. critizised for failing to consider many aspects of economic action, including a link to the macroeconomic level, culture, and politics. of Granovetter’s theory in general terms (cf. Nee 2005

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Randi Gressgård

impact negatively on the city as a whole ( Gressgård 2015b ). Based on idealised and idealising notions of the city, urban governance aims to recreate the urban characteristics that are needed for the city to be whole (once again) ( Tunström and Bradley 2015 : 77). Those who pose a threat to the city are hence not only – and not primarily – external enemies, but include also undesirable migrants and minority groups in its midst. Security and the expanded cohesion agenda The connection Reepalu makes between urban segregation (disintegration), immigration

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connection of the contemporary to the colonial’ (p. 260). In particular, St Louis’ chapter is masterful. He seriously considers ‘post-racial’ as an intellectual, ethical and historical project, deftly disentangling this idealised ‘practico-theoretical ensemble’ from the invidious political project of describing contemporary societies as ‘post-racial’. St Louis tracks and explores the great dilemma of racial eliminativism (that the theoretical incoherence of race cannot prevent its deadly social reality) from the emergence of evolutionary thinking to present day

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Randi Gressgård and Tina Gudrun Jensen

.g. Dobbernack 2014 ; Gressgård 2015b ; Tunström and Bradley 2015 ). Even though it is not always articulated in idealist terms, we would argue that the preoccupation with cohesion in urban governance reflects an idealised notion of the city as an entity. Still, the scholarly debate about these issues have been rather limited in scope as well as in perspective, testifying perhaps to the lacking interface between migration/minority studies and urban studies/planning in the Nordic region, in conjunction with the lack of funding opportunities for research projects that moves

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Karin Schwiter, Katharina Pelzelmayer and Isabelle Thurnherr

Abstract

This article analyses Swiss media coverage of 24 hours care between 2003 and 2013. Based on a discourse analysis we observe that the dominant media discourse speaks of a booming market that criticises agencies, victimises carers and idealises home care. In our discussion we analyse these results with a focus on the so-called blind spots of this media discourse. In particular, we challenge the claim of a boom in 24h care, shed light on the negative aspects of home care, and address the ignored responsibility of the family as employer.

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Andrew Bowsher

Abstract

This article examines the cultural practice of effecting an independent marketplace for reissued music in the United States, based on ethnographic fieldwork in Austin, Texas with independent record labels and consumers. As the music industry is not a homogenous entity (Williamson and Cloonan, 2007), I argue that the practice of legitimising an independent marketplace requires the formulation of a ‘mainstream’ market to which the independent is opposed, and the erecting of marketplace myths (Arsel and Thompson, 2010) to substantiate the independent marketplace’s claims to differ from the mainstream. Legitimising strategies (Strachan, 2007) protect the investments made by producers and consumers of goods in their marketplace. To overcome the anxiety that commodified culture is inauthentic culture, the independent marketplace for reissued music is idealised as a realm of soft capitalism that enables the commodification of cultural goods without the stigmatisation of profiteering, exploitation and ‘inorganic’ music associated with the mainstream (Negus, 1992).

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Daniel Miller and Mirca Madianou

Abstract:

This paper uses the concept of ‘cutting the network’ derived from the work of Marilyn Strathern to examine the relationship between two kinds of social network, that of kinship and the system of friends constructed on social networking sites. Specifically the material comes from a study of Filipina domestic workers and nurses in the UK and their relationship to their left behind children in the Philippines. A bilateral system of kinship can lead to a proliferation of relatives, while the use of the Friendster social networking site can lead to a proliferation of friends. It is when these two systems clash following the request by one's mother to become a friend that the constraints and problems posed by both systems comes into view. Cases show that it is possible to use social networking sites to help mothers become close friends for their absent children, but more commonly the increasing presence of actual mothers through new media disrupts the relationships that children had developed for themselves to a idealised projection of motherhood.

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Ana K. Spalding

Abstract:

Lifestyle migration, the flow of relatively affluent people from developed to developing countries, is characterized by the search for ‘lifestyle’ destinations with warm climates, reduced costs of living, and perceived higher quality of life. Mexico, Costa Rica, and Panama are three current major lifestyle migration destinations in Latin America. In this article I explore the emergence of this relatively new phenomenon in the Bocas del Toro Archipelago in Northwestern Panama by discussing the contradiction between lifestyle migrants’ idealized perception of place and local realities. I also introduce the implications of these contradicting versions of reality, and how they play out at the local level. Results show that, in general, foreign residents are attracted to Bocas del Toro as a physical manifestation of globally produced images and perceptions of tropical island living. However, an in-depth exploration reveals contradictions between expectations and reality. I suggest that foreigners exhibit a set of attitudes and behaviors towards their new home that are defined by a shared cultural and economic background that, on the ground, contribute to the creation of emerging markets, land conflicts, and changes in environmental practices. The ensuing narrative is contingent upon tensions between and within social, political, and ecological variables at the global and local levels.