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Francesca Pierini

Abstract

Marina Fiorato’s The Glassblower of Murano (2008) tells the story of Eleonora, a young woman who travels to Venice in search of her genealogical past and existential roots. Coming from London, Eleonora incarnates a “modern” outlook on what she assumes to be the timeless life and culture of Venice. At one point in the novel, admiring the old houses on the Canal Grande, Eleonora is “on fire with enthusiasm for this culture where the houses and the people kept their genetic essence so pure for millennia that they look the same now as in the Renaissance” (2008, 15). This discourse of pure origins and unbroken continuities is a fascinating fantasizing on characteristics that extend from the urban territory to the people who inhabit it. Within narratives centred on this notion, Italian culture, perceived as holding a privileged relation with history and the past, is often contrasted with the displacement and rootlessness that seem to characterize the modern places and people of England and North America. Through a discussion of two Anglo-American popular novels set in Italy, and several relocation narratives, this paper proposes an exploration of the notion according to which history is the force cementing the identities of societies perceived as less modern and frozen in a timeless dimension. From a point in time when the dialectics of history have been allegedly transcended, Anglo-American popular narratives observe Italy as a timeless, pre-modern other.

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Practicing Home in the Foreign

The multiple homing practices of artisan journeymen on the tramp

Dorte Jagetic Andersen and René Ejbye Pedersen

Abstract

Research in migrant practices has recognised that home crystallises into multiple forms subject to constant re-enactment when viewed from the perspective of mobile populations such as nomads and refugees. In this article, we illustrate how artisan journeymen who went on the tramp around the turn of the 20th century performed home in multiple ways when on the road and at arrival in new locations. Using a historical example, we oppose the suggestion, which is common in contemporary migration and transnational studies that recent years have witnessed a paradigmatic new way of enacting belonging. Ultimately, the argument is that instead of idealising certain notions of the traveller, or ways of practicing home, we need to keep an eye to the real-life tensions of homing and the multiplicity through which it expresses; we need to understand homing as the performance of “belonging trouble.”

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Zuzana Petrová

: Vygotsky’s and feuerstein’s perspectives in study of student learning. Educational Psychologist, 30(2), 67-75. Matusov, E. (1998). When solo activity is not privileged: Participation and internalization model of development. Human Development, 41, 326-349. Mercer, N. (2008). Talk and the development of reasoning and understanding. Human Development, 51, 90-100. Michaels, S., O’Connor, C., & Resnick, L. B. (2007). Deliberative discourse idealized and realized: accountable talk in the classroom and in civic life. Studies in

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Anna Maria Zawadzka and Anna Szabowska-Walaszczyk

of Vocational Behavior, 73, 78-91. Halliwell, E., & Dittmar, H. (2009). The role of self-improvement and self-evaluation motives in social comparisons with idealized female bodies in the media. Body Image, 2 (3), 249-261. Higgins, E.T. (1996). The “self digest”. Self-knowledge serving selfregulatory functions. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 71, 1062-1083. Huta, V., & Ryan, M.R. (2010). Pursuing pleasure or virtue: the differential and overlapping well-being benefits of hedonic and eudaimonic motives

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Adam Grabowski and Philip Broemer

-163. Richins, M.L. (1991). Social comparison and the idealized images of advertising. Journal of Consumer Research, 18, 71-83. Rothgerber, H. (1997). External intergroup threat as an antecedent to perceptions of in-group and out-group homogeneity. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 73, 1206-1212. Schmitt, M.T., Silvia, P.J., &Branscombe, N.R. (2000). The intersection of self-evaluation maintenance and social identity theories: Intragroup judgment in interpersonal and intergroup contexts. Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin

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Rolle Alho and Mika Helander

informal measures do the pickers rely on in trying to secure their living and working conditions in Finland? Our theoretical point of departure is Mark Granovetter’s (1985) concept of embeddedness, which stresses that economic relations are embedded in concrete social networks and do not exist in an abstract idealised market. Despite the limitations 1 Granovetter has been e.g. critizised for failing to consider many aspects of economic action, including a link to the macroeconomic level, culture, and politics. of Granovetter’s theory in general terms (cf. Nee 2005

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Randi Gressgård

impact negatively on the city as a whole ( Gressgård 2015b ). Based on idealised and idealising notions of the city, urban governance aims to recreate the urban characteristics that are needed for the city to be whole (once again) ( Tunström and Bradley 2015 : 77). Those who pose a threat to the city are hence not only – and not primarily – external enemies, but include also undesirable migrants and minority groups in its midst. Security and the expanded cohesion agenda The connection Reepalu makes between urban segregation (disintegration), immigration

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Randi Gressgård and Tina Gudrun Jensen

.g. Dobbernack 2014 ; Gressgård 2015b ; Tunström and Bradley 2015 ). Even though it is not always articulated in idealist terms, we would argue that the preoccupation with cohesion in urban governance reflects an idealised notion of the city as an entity. Still, the scholarly debate about these issues have been rather limited in scope as well as in perspective, testifying perhaps to the lacking interface between migration/minority studies and urban studies/planning in the Nordic region, in conjunction with the lack of funding opportunities for research projects that moves

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connection of the contemporary to the colonial’ (p. 260). In particular, St Louis’ chapter is masterful. He seriously considers ‘post-racial’ as an intellectual, ethical and historical project, deftly disentangling this idealised ‘practico-theoretical ensemble’ from the invidious political project of describing contemporary societies as ‘post-racial’. St Louis tracks and explores the great dilemma of racial eliminativism (that the theoretical incoherence of race cannot prevent its deadly social reality) from the emergence of evolutionary thinking to present day

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Francisco Javier Romero Caro

Abstract

Since it was passed, the Clarity Act has been at the core of any secessionist debate in Canada and abroad. Although contested at home, the Clarity Act has earned worldwide prestige as the democratic standard that must be observed when a secessionist debate arises. In the last fifteen years Spain has experienced successive debates about the need to establish a mechanism of popular consultation to address secessionist claims in the Basque Country and Catalonia. Most political actors in favour of such consultations have expressed their will to import the Canadian Clarity Act as a tool to settle disputes on how to conduct a referendum. However, this deification of the Canadian example is, for the most part, based on a misreading of the Secession Reference, only taking into account certain passages while ignoring others. The emphasis tends to be made on the quantitative clear majority test, disregarding other factors. Hence, the aim of this paper is to study the causes of this deification of the Clarity Act in Spain, and its influence on the treatment of secessionist claims that the country is currently experiencing.