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Natalia Petruk

References 1. Alberti, L. (1960). I libri della famiglia. Opert volgari [Thoughts on Family. The Collections of Works]. Volume 1. Laterza, 472 p. (in Italian). 2. Garin, E. (1971). Educazione umanistica in Italia [Humanistic Education on Italy], Bari, 120 p. (in Italian). 3. Kristeller, P. (1974). Humanismus und Renaissance [Humanism and Renaissance]. Munchen : Fink, 539 p. (in German). 4. Lytvynov, V. (2012). Ukraine: Seeking Its Identity. The 16th-Early 17th Centuries. Historical and

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Natalia Petruk

References 1. Домбровський, І. (1995). Дніпрові камені. Українські гуманісти епохи Відродження. Антологія [Dnipro Stones. Ukrainian humanist of Renaissance. Anthology]. K. : Наукова думка; Основи, Part 2, p. 200–221 (in Ukrainian). 2. Кленович, С. (1984). Роксоланія. Антологія української поезії [Roksolania. Anthology of Ukrainian poetry]. V. 1. K. : Дніпро, p. 62–77 (in Ukrainian). 3. Литвинов, В. (2000). Ренесансний гуманізм в Україні [Renaissance humanism in Ukraine]. K : Основи, p. 468 (in Ukrainian). 4. Литвинов, В. (2005). Католицька Русь

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Helen Cahill, Julia Coffey and Kylie Smith

Abstract

The development of gendered identities during early childhood and youth occurs in a context of ‘body culture’ and the hyper-visibility of ‘perfect’ bodies, which align with traditional gender ideals. Embodied methods can assist to make complexity more visible, and to allow participants to see fluidity, shifts, and becoming. Whilst there has been significant theoretical development, further methodological innovations are needed to enable children and youth to articulate their perceptions of the way multiple influences shape their relations with their own bodies. Informed by ‘new materialist’ feminist theory this article will examine the work of Australian educators exploring use of creative and embodied drama-based play. The chapter advances methodologies to support pedagogical engagement with young children and youth about gender, identity and social change. The authors explore how embodied creative play can be used across ages to support children and young people to articulate the ways social norms and expectations influence their desires, imaginings, fears and actions and their perceptions of what is possible, desirable or appropriate in relation to performances of gender in their everyday worlds.

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Nataliia Petruk

Abstract

The article is dedicated to analysis of the content and the peculiarities of school education in Ukraine in view of disseminating the leading ideas of European humanistic pedagogy during the 16th-17th centuries. It has been noted that during the period of disseminating humanistic ideas the principles of Ukrainian education and Ukrainian school were forming in an active interaction with European culture and European education. Ukrainian school education is seen as a phenomenon that has accumulated the values of Western European humanistic culture, namely, respect for the individual, awareness of intellectual activity importance, the value of labour, understanding of the need for education and knowledge of languages. An active role in disseminating the pan-European models of education has been played by an intellectual environment, which was forming in the well known cultural and educational centers of Ukraine of the 16th-17th centuries, such as the Ostroh Culture and Education Center, the Lviv Brother School, the Kyiv Brother School, the Kyiv Collegium. Ukrainian intellectual elite, namely, university professors, teachers, students, have become the main carriers of education. The nature of the processes taking place in the educational space of Ukraine have been significantly influenced by the circumstances of religious life associated with the protection of the Orthodox Church before the onset of Catholicism. High standards of education, knowledge of the old classical and modern European languages were an important basis for the full-fledged spiritual development of the Ukrainian ethnic group. A retrospective consideration of the past reveals new meanings and imperatives in development of modern Ukrainian education, and the rich experience of Ukrainian teachers, collegium lecturers, professors of the first universities justify the necessary reasons for Ukrainian education entering into the European space.

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Gertrude Sachs, Terry Fisher and Joanna Cannon

-86. Bernard, H. W., & Huckins, W. C. (1974). Humanism in the classroom. An eclectic approach to teaching and learning. Boston, MA: Allyn and Bacon. Brisk, M. E. (Ed.). (2008). Language, culture, and community in teacher education. New York: Lawrence Erlbaum. Britzman, D. (2007). Teacher education as uneven development: Toward a psychology of uncertainty. International Journal Leadership in Education, 10 (1), 1-12. Cave, P. (2009). Humanism. Oxford, England: Oneworld

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Eugeniusz Świtała

Traditions. Laszlo, E. (2009). The akashic experience: Science and the cosmic memory field. Rochester Vermont: Inner Traditions. Mariettaa, Don Jr. (1995). For people and the planet: Holism and humanism in environmental ethics . Philadelphia: Temple University Press. Martenson, Ch. (2011). The crash course: The unsustainable future of our economy, energy, and environment . New Jersey: John Wiley & Sons. McNerney, C. & Davis, N. D. (1996). Education for sustainability: An agenda for action . Darby: DIANE Publishing Co. Meyer, J. (1976

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Eva Alerby, Erica Hagström and Susanne Westman

-Ponty, M. (1964). The primacy of perception. Chicago: Northwestern UniversityPress. Merleau-Ponty, M., & Lefort, C. (1968). The visible and the invisible: Followed by working notes [Visible et l’invisible.]. Evanston: Northwestern University Press. Merleau-Ponty, M. (1982). Sense and non-sense. Evanston: Northwestern Univ. Press. Merleau-Ponty, M. (2000). Humanism and terror: The communist problem. New Brunswick, N.J.: Transaction. Merleau-Ponty, M. (2002). Phenomenology of perception [Phénoménologie de la

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Tanja Tillmanns, Charlotte Holland and Alfredo Salomão Filho

: 10.1080/00958961003674665 Ferrante, A., & Sartori, D. (2016). From anthropocentrism to post-humanism in the educational debate. Relations, 4.2 (November), 175–194, doi: 10.7358/rela-2016-002-fesa Fundación Telefónica. (2012). May the horse live in me: Tercer Premio VIDA 14.0 [Video file]. Retrieved from https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Awz4w22tFHw Gregory, M. (2014). Ethics education as philosophical practice: the case from Socratic, critical and contemplative pedagogies. Teaching Ethics, 15 (1), 19–34, doi: 10.5840/tej201410173 Jickling

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Maryam Homayounzadeh

?. Learning and Instruction , 22, 27-36. McCombs, B. L., & Miller, L. (2007). Learner-centered classroom practices and assessments: Maximizing student motivation, learning, and achievement . Thousand Oaks, CA: Corwin Press. Nemiroff, G. H. (1992). Reconstructing education: Toward a theory of critical humanism , USA: Greenwood Publishing Group. Paris, S. G. & Byrnes, J. P. (1989). The constructivist approach to self-regulation and learning in the classroom. In Zimmerman, B. & Schunk, D. H. (Eds.), Self-regulated learning and academic achievement: theory

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Kyle Wanberg

. (2011). Governmentality-Neoliberalism-Education: the Risk Perspective. Journal of Pedagogy/Pedagogický Časopis , 2 (2), 145-160. Kaščák, O., Pupala, B., Petrova, Z. (2011). Humanism and Autonomy in the Neoliberal Reform of Teacher Training. Education, Knowledge and Economy , 5 (1-2), 71-88. Liptak, A. (2012). Blocking Parts of Arizona Law, Justices Allow Its Centerpiece . Retrieved June 25, 2012 from http://www.nytimes.com/2012/06/26/us/supreme-court-rejects-part-of-arizona-immigration-law.html?pagewanted=all&_r=0